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‘Homecoming’ only the beginning for Beyoncé and Netflix

ROLLINGOUT.COM — It appears that Beyoncé‘s new documentary will not be her last collaboration with Netflix. The “Crazy in Love” hitmaker reportedly is working on two more Netflix projects.

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By Rollingout.com

It appears that Beyoncé‘s new documentary will not be her last collaboration with Netflix.

The “Crazy in Love” hitmaker reportedly is working on two more Netflix projects.

The 37-year-old singer has already made a behind-the-scenes documentary, Homecoming, for the streaming service, and Netflix is said to have committed as much as $60 million to work with Beyoncé.

Homecoming cost the streaming company around $20 million, according to Variety, which reports that Beyoncé is set to create two further projects for Netflix.

The first of the three specials — which premiered earlier this month — saw Beyoncé give her fans an insight into her 2018 Coachella performance.

The singer, who is married to rap star Jay-Z, also admitted to having an emergency cesarean section after her baby’s heart stopped “a few times” in the womb.

Beyoncé — who has 7-year-old Blue Ivy and 20-month-old twins Rumi and Sir with her husband — spoke candidly about her “extremely difficult” pregnancy.

Explaining how her “surprise” pregnancy meant she had to scrap her planned headline slot at the 2017 Coachella festival, Beyoncé said: “I was supposed to do Coachella the year prior but I got pregnant unexpectedly. And it ended up being twins, which was even more of a surprise.”

“My body went through more than I knew it could. I was 218 pounds the day I gave birth. I had an extremely difficult pregnancy. I had high blood pressure. I developed toxemia, preeclampsia. And in the womb, one of my babies’ hearts paused a few times so I had to get an emergency C-section.”

Beyoncé also confessed to suffering “muscle spasms” when she first started rehearsing for her Coachella performance in 2018.

She said: “In the beginning, there were so many muscle spasms and just internally, my body was not connected. My mind was not there. My mind wanted to be with my children. What people don’t see is the sacrifice.

“I would dance and go off to the trailer and breastfeed the babies, the days I could I would bring the children. I’m just trying to figure out how to balance being the mother of a 6-year-old and twins that need me and giving myself creativity. Physically, it was a lot to juggle.

“It’s like, before I could rehearse 15 hours straight. I have children, I have a husband, I have to take care of my body.”

Details of Beyoncé’s other two Netflix projects have yet to be released. In the meantime, enjoy Homecoming if you haven’t already seen it, starting with the trailer below.

This article originally appeared Rollingout.com.

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Art

Maestro Michael Morgan Conducts San Francisco Symphony

Morgan was born and raised in Wash., D.C., and is recognized worldwide for innovative and thematically rich programs that make connections between a wide range of artists and musical cultures.

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Maestro Michael Morgan

Maestro Michael Morgan, music director and conductor of the Oakland Symphony, will conduct the San Francisco Symphony at Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco, CA, Friday, July 23, 2021 at 7:00 p.m.

The program will include the overture to Gioachino Rossini’s opera “La gazza ladra,” along with a playful Pas de Six from “William Tell.” Louise Farrenc’s revelatory Symphony No. 3 from 1847 takes center stage, while the program concludes with James P. Johnson’s Roaring 20s hit, “Charleston.”

“I am thrilled to be helping the San Francisco Symphony share all the wonderful things they do with a wider and more diverse audience’, said Morgan.

Morgan’s ties to the San Francisco Symphony stretch back to 1994, when he first led Concerts for Kids performances.

Morgan was born and raised in Wash., D.C., and is recognized worldwide for innovative and thematically rich programs that make connections between a wide range of artists and musical cultures.

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Art

Griot Theater Company Presents ‘The Queen of Cubs’ in Mill Valley

This play grapples with social justice issues and current events. Featured singers and performers will include the appearance of Rafiki the baboon as yoga instructor and tour guide.

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Top: Oakwood Trail overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge. (Photo by Natalie O’Connor). Bottom left: Illustration of Nala (Griot Theater Company). Bottom right: LeShawn Darnell Holcomb speaking at the June 27 Griothon (Photo by Godfrey Lee).

The Griot Theater Company will be presenting their play “The Queen of Cubs,” a theater adaption of Disney’s “Lion King,” on Saturday, July 18, at 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 3:00 p.m.    The play is an ‘exertainment,’ a combination of exercise and entertainment and will be presented on the Oakwood Valley – Alta Trail in Tennessee Valley in Mill Valley.

The “Queen of Cubs” play, co-written by Griot Theater Company Artistic Director LeShawn Darnell Holcomb, follows Nala’s story from cubhood to lioness-hood. Will she and the other lionesses survive her uncle’s tyranny or will they die from his antagonistic ways?

This play grapples with social justice issues and current events. Featured singers and performers will include the appearance of Rafiki the baboon as yoga instructor and tour guide.

Go to www.griottheatercompany.org for more information about Griot Theater Company and to get tickets for the play.

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Black History

Florence Beatrice Price: A First in Classical Music

In 1903, Price attended the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Knowing that race was a barrier for entry, she presented herself as being of Mexican descent. In three years, she earned a soloist’s diploma in organ and a teacher’s diploma in piano.

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Florence Beatrice Price/ International Florence Price Festival

Eleven years into the Jim Crow laws, Florence B. Price (1888–1953) was born into a middle-class family in Little Rock, Ark. It was a time when anyone of African descent in North America, no matter their successes, was viewed as part of the under-class.
Price’s mother was a music teacher, owned and ran a restaurant, worked in real estate, and served as secretary of the International Loan and Trust Company. 

Her father was an artist, a notable dentist, and inventor of patented dental tools.
The family was considered among the ‘10 percenters,’ meaning people who benefited from a classical education and had the potential to lead American society.

They were known to host gatherings of the Black intelligentsia. Young Florence entertained those guests on the piano, a skill taught by her mother.
In 1903, Price attended the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Knowing that race was a barrier for entry, she presented herself as being of Mexican descent. In three years, she earned a soloist’s diploma in organ and a teacher’s diploma in piano.
Encouraged to compose, Florence studied composition and counterpoint. Her early works included pieces for piano and organ. She later returned to the South, teaching at the Arkadelphia Presbyterian Academy and later at Little Rock’s Shorter College. She became head of the music department at Clark University in Atlanta (1910–1912), and then returned to Little Rock.
Despite her qualifications, Price was denied membership to the Arkansas State Music Teachers Association. Refusing to give up, she established her own music studio and founded the Little Rock Club of Musicians. 

At that time, racial tension in Little Rock was escalating. The numbers of Black men being beaten and lynched were on the rise. Price and her husband fled to Chicago for their safety.
The Prices divorced in 1931, leaving Florence a single mother. She then played the organ for silent film screenings and wrote popular songs for WGN radio. She forged friendships with like-minded musicians and artists and continued her composition studies. Eventually, Price’s concert music came to the attention of one of her teachers, which led to her big break in 1932.
Price won several prizes at the Wanamaker Music Composition Contest. These successes attracted the attention of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s music director, who, soon after, conducted a performance of Price’s First Symphony (1933).

At that moment, she became established as a composer of note and the first Black woman in American history to have a symphonic work performed by a major American orchestra.
“It is a faultless work, a work that speaks its own message with restraint and yet with passion … worthy of a place in the regular symphonic repertory,” the Chicago Daily News reported.
Despite her success, Price struggled, surviving mostly on the kindness of friends. She suffered from poor health and was often hospitalized. By 1953, her work was gaining a new momentum. While preparing for a promotion trip to Europe, she suffered a heart attack and died.

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