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Nancy Sidebotham Runs for Oakland City Council At-Large

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Nancy Sidebotham

Nancy Sidebotham believes Oaklanders deserve better and wants voters to take back City Hall.

The owner of a tax business since 1973, Sidebotham is no stranger to running for office in Oakland.  She ran for District 6 six times, mayor once, and this will be the second run for the at-large City Council seat.  She has yet to win.

She has been a member of the Community Policing Advisory, Neighborhood Watch, and Shop Oakland boards. She was involved in shutting down the Animal Shelter and getting one built.

Sidebotham’s top priority for Oakland is to have an outside audit performed and to find money for services just like the city of El Sobrante did.

Her second priority is to bridge work with the other Oakland City Council districts.  She believes in representing the community and in asking the community what they want.

Born in Panama in 1945, Sidebotham is the daughter of a banker.  She moved to Oakland in 1964 and lives alone in Millsmont since her long-time partner, Vickie, passed in 2003.

Sidebotham’s views are straightforward and indicative of the work she wants to do in office.

She blames former Mayor Jerry Brown for gentrification in Oakland, but sees homelessness as a national problem and worsening in 2021 with the end of the COVID-19 protections.

She advocates using the Alameda County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton as a resource for the homeless.  The infrastructure is present for the unhoused community.

The Alameda County Social Services Dept. is ignoring Oakland and not providing needed services, she says and expressed concerned about the developers taking money out of Oakland and gang warfare.

On her website Nancy talks about “voters [taking] back City Hall. . . . Are you tired of the rhetoric, the continuous high taxes, the lack of jobs and business opportunities, the high crime rate?  Are you tired of being ignored by your elected officials?”

“The election is not about money, it’s about your vote and Oakland’s future!  Most voters are trying to make ends meet while City Hall continues to tax you for services unseen.  I understand how the City operates and what needs to be done to make Oakland once again a viable city.”

She adds that the last time Oakland was a viable city was when Henry Gardner was City Manager from 1981– 1993.

For more information go to NancySidebotham.com.

Community

Students, Community Organizations Ask Judge to Order Mental Health Services, Internet Access

Arguing that appropriating billions of dollars alone will not ensure action, community organizations and parents from Los Angeles and Oakland are asking an Alameda County Superior Court judge to order the state to immediately provide computers and internet access and address the mental health needs of children who have borne the brunt of the pandemic.

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Arguing that appropriating billions of dollars alone will not ensure action, community organizations and parents from Los Angeles and Oakland are asking an Alameda County Superior Court judge to order the state to immediately provide computers and internet access and address the mental health needs of children who have borne the brunt of the pandemic.

The May 3 request for immediate relief comes six months after the plaintiffs sued the State Board of Education, the California Department of Education and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond. Now, they are seeking a preliminary injunction to force the state to respond. Superior Court Judge Winifred Smith has set June 4 for a hearing.

“The state cannot just write big checks and then say, ‘We’re not paying attention to what happens here,’” said Mark Rosenbaum, a directing attorney with the pro bono law firm Public Counsel. Public Counsel and the law firm Morrison and Foerster filed the lawsuit on behalf of 15 children and two organizations: The Oakland Reach and the Community Coalition, which is based in Los Angeles. 

In their initial, 84-page filing, they claimed the state had shirked its responsibility to ensure that low-income Black and Latino children were receiving adequate distance learning, with computers and internet access the Legislature said all children were entitled to. Instead, they argued, children “lost precious months” of learning, falling further behind because of poor internet connections, malfunctioning computers and a lack of counseling and extra academic help.

“While the COVID-19 pandemic was unavoidable, these harms were not. Yet for most of this period, state officials constitutionally charged with ensuring that all of California’s children receive at least basic educational equality have remained on the sidelines,” the plaintiffs argued.

Angela J., of Oakland, whose three children are plaintiffs in the case, elaborated on the difficulties they encountered during a year under distance learning in a declaration filed with the latest plaintiffs’ motion. 

Although she is president of the PTA, her school has been uncommunicative and unresponsive to requests for technical help and lesson plans, she wrote. Her children are falling behind and “suffering emotionally,” she said. Her third-grade twins are supposed to be doing multiplication and division but are struggling with subtraction. “They are supposed to be able to write essays, but they can barely write two sentences.”

The Oakland Reach and the Community Coalition have stepped in with technical help and support for hundreds of families that district schools should have provided, the plaintiffs’ motion said. The Community Coalition hired tutors and partnered with YMCA-Crenshaw to provide in-person learning pods with 100 laptops on site. The Oakland Reach hired 19 family liaisons, started a preschool literacy program and offered online enrichment programs for students.

Months passed, infection rates declined, schools made plans to reopen, and then in March, Gov. Gavin Newsom and the Legislature appropriated $6.6 billion in COVID-19 relief that school districts can put toward summer school, tutoring, mental health, teacher training and other academic supports. By June 1 — less than a month from now — districts and charter schools are required to complete a report, after consulting with parents and teachers, on how they plan to spend the money.

But the plaintiffs argue in their latest filing, “this funding comes with no oversight, assistance, or enforcement to ensure that the funds will be used properly to address the issues relating to digital devices, learning loss, and mental health support.” And there’s no requirement that districts begin this summer to address the harm that the most impacted students have felt, the statement said.“Schools are indeed ‘reopening’ to one degree or another, but absent a mandate that all students receive what they need to learn and to catch up, or any guidance from the State that would help them do so,” the filing said.

In a statement, California Department of Education spokesman Scott Roark acknowledged that the pandemic has disproportionately impacted those who “are vulnerable by historic and systemic inequities,” and cited the department’s work obtaining hundreds of thousands of computers, expanding internet access and providing guidance to educators on distance learning for highest-needs students.

“As we work to return children back to the classroom, we will maintain a laser focus on protecting the health and safety of our school communities while providing the supports needed to ensure learning continues and, where gaps persist, is improved,” the statement said.

In passing legislation accompanying the state budget last June, the Legislature laid out requirements for distance learning that school districts must meet to receive school funding. They included providing all students with access to a computer and the internet. 

Missing, however, was an enforcement requirement, like the monitoring that’s used to verify that students in low-income schools have textbooks, safe and clean facilities and qualified classroom teachers. That system was set up in 2004 through a settlement of Williams v. State of California, in which low-income families sued the state over its failure to assure safe and equitable conditions in schools.  

At the time, Rosenbaum was a lead attorney for the ACLU of Southern California, which brought the lawsuit with Public Advocates and other civil rights organizations.

Despite efforts by Thurmond and districts over the past year to get technology in place, Thurmond estimated in October that as many as 1 million students lacked devices or sufficient bandwidth to adequately participate in distance learning from home. Between federal and state funding, districts have plenty of money to buy computers, and the Legislature is considering several bills to fund internet access statewide (see here and here). 

They won’t solve the immediate challenge, but they could become relevant if there were to be a settlement in this case, as in the Williams lawsuit.

Among their requests, the plaintiffs are asking the court to order the state to:

  • Determine which students lack devices and connectivity and ensure that districts immediately provide them;
  • Ensure that all students and teachers have access to adequate mental health supports;
  • Provide weekly outreach to families of all low-income Black or Latino students to aid in transitioning back to in-person learning through August 2022;
  • Provide a statewide plan to ensure that districts put in place programs to remedy the learning loss caused by remote learning.

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Bay Area

Coming Out of the Darkness Into the Light

Through collaborations with volunteers, non-profit organizations, churches, the City of Oakland, and businesses we are determined to reach out and just serve the needs of those who desperately need help.

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 It has been quite a while since I have written columns for the Post News Group.  I am especially glad to be back and to write from a different location.
    This is my first column since I was released from San Quentin because of the COVID-19 epidemic that ravished and destroyed so many lives since March of 2020.
    Since my release from prison, I’ve come to understand more clearly how life has changed so drastically for so many, even before the detrimental impact of COVID.  I see first-hand how so many lives have literally been turned upside down, living on the streets and battling a new reality that sucks the life out of so many struggling to survive.
      By observing from afar the impact of homelessness, despair, hopelessness, and utter desperation, I see how the less fortunate are forced to deal with collective and prolonged adversity on an unheard-of scale.
    And, now coming out of prison, and seeking a new life in the midst of these trying times, I have chosen a personal mission to give back to those in need in the community.  I am doing this as my pledge to help correct the wrong that I participated in.  I want to make things right.
    I also hope to be of service to those I have ignored, disgraced, or harmed directly and indirectly.
    To begin to accomplish my mission I will be participating in an event that we have titled “Reparations for those Deserving.”  This project will initially focus on massive food distribution.  We hope to provide free food for as many as possible to those who show up at our distribution sites.
    With the help of the Oakland Post print and online editions (www.postnewsgroup.com), I will be announcing the dates, times, and locations of this massive food giveaway. project.  

    Through collaborations with volunteers, non-profit organizations, churches, the City of Oakland, and businesses we are determined to reach out and just serve the needs of those who desperately need help.  

    I am encouraged by the churches and many of the pastors in Oakland that have already stepped up to be a part of our “Just Serve those that are deserving” effort.
    What makes me proud as I now walk in freedom from prison is to see how many others who are part of the “formerly incarcerated” population who were previously written off as being worthless scourges, are now stepping up to the plate to redeem themselves from their past indiscretions by giving back to those in need.  

     Having served many years behind bars, and many more in solitary confinement, I know that these volunteers are sincere in stepping forward to do the right thing to rectify the wrongs they had previously done.
    I believe that a change from being negative to being positive can happen all at once or in spurts.  I am hopeful that by working together we can and will make a change, at once or in spurts.

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Activism

Rally Against Hate, Plan to Reopen Businesses in Downtown Oakland

With COVID, urban riots, and racist attacks, the question that comes to mind is whether we have lost Chinatown.

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Carl Chan, president of the Chinatown Chamber of Commerce, Greg McConnell, president of the Jobs and Housing Coalition, and Rick da Silva stand in front of the Pacific Renaissance Plaza. The plaza has been boarded up whenever there have been protests and has spent a lot of time under wraps this past year. Photo by Mimi Rohr

 

     Drive through downtown Oakland and you get the impression that the city has been lost.  Part of that is due to COVID-19.  For the past 18 months, we have been on lockdown.  People have not been meeting face to face.  Instead, we are Zoomers.  

     As we come out of the pandemic and venture outside, we notice there is another reason that cities look like ghost towns.  Storefronts are boarded up and often tagged with graffiti. Many people we have talked to say the appearance of downtown Oakland is depressing.  Some say it looks as though the urban rioters who took advantage of peaceful protests have won.  They own the streets because Oakland has surrendered.

     Ride through Oakland Chinatown and you see the same images. As we enter post-COVID status, residents and visitors are confronted with boarded-up storefronts and the impression that, save a few markets, Chinatown is not open for business.  

     Unfortunately, in addition to the pandemic and urban riots, Chinatown must deal with a recent spate of racist attacks on Asians. These attacks against Asians are happening in urban areas throughout the country, but they are particularly challenging for Oakland Chinatown residents and businesses.

      With COVID, urban riots, and racist attacks, the question that comes to mind is whether we have lost Chinatown.  The resounding answer from Chinatown leaders is “No, We Have Not!”    

     On May 11, Carl Chan and Rick da Silva of the Chinatown Chamber of Commerce (Chinatown Chamber), took Mimi Rohr and Greg McConnell of the Jobs and Housing Coalition (JHC)  on a tour of Chinatown to see first-hand what is going on in the community.  We saw boarded-up storefronts and fewer people on the streets.  

     When I asked Chan whether the business was down, he indicated that it was, but he also said with absolute certainty “Chinatown will come back.  Chinese people are resilient, and they do not surrender”.

  

Chan and da Silva went on to say that the Chinatown Chamber is going to lead a bold program to Onboard Chinatown.  “We want to bring life back to our area and we cannot do that if people think everything is closed down. We want all of Oakland to come and support Chinatown.  For that to happen, we need to restore normality and a feeling of safety by having the streets again filled with people bustling along.”

    JHC stands in solidarity with timber Chinatown Cha.  We encourage the entire city to do the same.  Chinatown is the fourth-highest revenue producer for Oakland.  Tax revenues derived from Chinatown pay for many of the services that Oakland needs to survive.

    But more important than just the financial loss to Oakland, if we lose Chinatown, we lose a piece of Oakland.  Supporting Chinatown is imperative in a city that prides itself on racial diversity and openness to all people.  

    On May 15, the Oakland Chinatown Chamber of Commerce is holding a “Unite Against Hate March and Rally” at the Pacific Renaissance Plaza, 388 9th St., in Oakland Chinatown.  In addition to an expression to reject hate, Chan and Silva will announce their Onboard Chinatown program.

     JHC will be there to help.  We encourage all residents, businesses, and nonprofit groups in Oakland to join in the struggle against hate and help reclaim the city by onboarding our businesses.  We call on the Oakland City Government to provide public-safety protection for the residents of Chinatown and everyone throughout the city of Oakland.  If we are to onboard, the city must make sure we can do so safely.

     We hope Chinatown’s leadership will help bring Oakland back from the problems we have endured from the pandemic, riots that followed peaceful protests, and racial hatred.  JHC stands with leaders like Chan and da Silva and together we will reopen our city and restore normalcy and safety.

Greg McConnell is president of the Job and Housing Coalition 

and Carl Chan is president of the Chinatown Chamber of Commerce

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