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San Quentin Warriors Jam Kerr’s Golden State Warriors

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By Rahsaan Thomas, San Quentin News Sports Editor

 

Incredible, but true: The San Quentin Warriors defeated members of their namesake Golden State Warriors by four points, 92-88, in a hard-fought basketball game on the Lower Yard.

 

 

“You guys won the right to be called the ‘Real Warriors’ fair and square,” said the team’s assistant general manager, Kirk Lacob.

 

The September 26, 2014 visit attracted a crowd of some 300 inmates, guests and prison staff. It was Golden State’s third game at the prison, but the first time San Quentin won. In 2013 Mark Jackson and Brian Scalabrine played. In 2012, Draymond Green visited and signed autographs.

 

“This gives the guys something to look forward to,” said Public Information Officer, Lt. Sam Robinson. “Prison existence is mundane, these guys coming in here is nothing but uplifting.”

 

The Golden State team included assistant coaches and former NBA players Luke Walton and Jarron Collins, Golden State General Manager Bob Myers, Johnny “Logo” West (Jerry West’s son), Chris DeMarco, Nick Uren and Lacob.

 

The Golden State group was coached by head coach Steve Kerr the first half and assistant coach Alvin Gentry the second. The game remained close to the end.

 

With less than two minutes left in the game, Lacob knocked down a three-pointer, bringing Golden State to within one point at 89-88.

 

Then Lacob fouled Warriors point guard Joshua Burton. Burton made both clutch free throws leaving the score 91-88.

 

With thirty seconds left, Golden State fouled Burton again and he hit one free throw, giving San Quentin a four-point lead.

 

Walton went for the three-pointer from the top of the key and missed. Anthony Ammons rebounded the ball for San Quentin. Myers, who led Golden State with 27 points, fouled him hard stopping the clock at10 seconds.

 

“Bob Myers just committed his first felony with that foul there,” joked San Quentin commentator Aaron “Harun” Taylor.

 

Ammons missed both free throws. With time running out Golden State went for another three but missed, leaving San Quentin the winner at the buzzer.

 

“What makes basketball a beautiful sport is that it brings us all together,” said Kerr.

 

Active Golden State players Marreese “Mo” Speights, Ognjen Kuzmi and Festus Ezeli, who couldn’t play in the game because they are under contract, watched from the bench. Rookies Mitchell Watt from the University of Buffalo, Aaron Craft from Ohio State, and James McAdoo from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill also attended.

 

“This is the biggest event yet,” said inmate Robert Butler. “You have four generations of basketball players in here.”

 

The game was full of highlights.

 

Thad Fleeton, the 5’10” power forward for San Quentin, made an up and under layup in the middle of 6’6” and 7-foot competitors, taking a 26-24 lead early in the second quarter.

 

At the start of the fourth, with the score tied at 72-72. San Quentin Warrior’s Joshua Burton threw an alley-oop to Allan McIntosh for a tie-breaking slam-dunk. McIntosh led all scorers with 33 points.

 

“McIntosh was great,” Myers declared.

 

In the fourth quarter, Harry “ATL” Smith blocked Collins’ dunk attempt at the rim. The crowd erupted in cheers.

 

Smith finished with 22 points and 14 rebounds, showing his talent with a couple of monster jams and blocks. Collins finished with 12 points and 15 rebounds.

 

“My players, after all the hard work and listening to my mouth, came through in a big way,” said inmate Daniel Wright, who coaches the San Quentin team.

 

The Warriors said they would be back next year to prove themselves after the loss.

 

“They beat us good.” Myers said. “It gives me more motivation for next year.”

Activism

Rep. Barbara Lee Issues Statement on 2nd Anniversary of George Floyd, Applauds Executive Order on Policing

“Two years ago, George Floyd’s brutal murder at the hands of law enforcement swept the nation. His life was taken from him by a broken, racist criminal justice system. While his death catalyzed protests across the country, real systemic change has largely been out of reach,” said Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA)

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“Hundreds of others have been the victims of racial profiling in the years since, some losing their lives, some making the news, other cases not getting the attention they warranted. On this painful anniversary, my thoughts and prayers are first and foremost with George’s family (pictured) and community,” said Rep. Barbara Lee.
“Hundreds of others have been the victims of racial profiling in the years since, some losing their lives, some making the news, other cases not getting the attention they warranted. On this painful anniversary, my thoughts and prayers are first and foremost with George’s family (pictured) and community,” said Rep. Barbara Lee.

Rep. Barbara Lee issued the following statement Wednesday on the second anniversary of the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, and in response to a new Executive Order on policing issued by President Biden:

“Two years ago, George Floyd’s brutal murder at the hands of law enforcement swept the nation. His life was taken from him by a broken, racist criminal justice system. While his death catalyzed protests across the country, real systemic change has largely been out of reach.

“Hundreds of others have been the victims of racial profiling in the years since, some losing their lives, some making the news, other cases not getting the attention they warranted. On this painful anniversary, my thoughts and prayers are first and foremost with George’s family and community.

“Today, President Biden made progress in repairing the broken system that led to George’s death with a historic Executive Order to combat police brutality. I commend the president for taking action to promote accountability, raise standards, increase transparency, and reform the criminal justice system.

“However, this EO alone is not enough. State and local police departments must follow. The Senate must find the political will to abolish the filibuster and pass meaningful police accountability legislation. Black lives and the fate of this nation depend on it.”

Read the full text of the executive order here.

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Bay Area

What California Is Learning from Expanding Voters Rights

Mail-in ballot voting has been underway since the second week in May.  Assembly Bill 37, signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom in 2021, requires the state to send vote-by-mail (VBM) ballots to every registered voter in the state. The law applies to all elections held after Jan. 1, 2022.

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California’s response to the current trend in some states that will limit voting, is to make access and methods of voting easier.
California’s response to the current trend in some states that will limit voting, is to make access and methods of voting easier.

By Joe W. Bowers Jr., California Black Media

June 7, 2022 is Primary Election Day in California.

On the ballot are candidates for U.S. Senate, Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Controller, Treasurer, Attorney General, Insurance Commissioner, State Board of Equalization, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, U.S. House of Representatives, State Senate and State Assembly, as well as candidates for local elected positions.

There are two contests for U.S. Senate on the ballot. One is for a full six-year term ending Jan. 3, 2029. The other is for the remainder of the term that Sen. Alex Padilla (D-CA) has been serving in place of Vice. President Kamala Harris that ends Jan. 3, 2023.

Mail-in ballot voting has been underway since the second week in May.  Assembly Bill 37, signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom in 2021, requires the state to send vote-by-mail (VBM) ballots to every registered voter in the state. The law applies to all elections held after Jan. 1, 2022.

Ballots are sent 29 days before the election, which was May 9 for the primary. For the November General Election, voters will start receiving ballots October 10.

A majority of California voters live in counties that have adopted the Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) system. In 2016, Senate Bill 450 created the VCA, an election model that expands voters’ options for how, when and where they can cast their ballots in an attempt to provide more accessible voting options.

VBM ballots are provided with a postage-paid return envelope. For a ballot to count in the upcoming primary election, it must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received by June 14, 2022. It can also be dropped off in-person to a secure ballot drop box, a voting location or county elections office by 8:00 p.m. on June 7, 2022.

The VCA is an optional law. Counties elect if they want to adopt it. In 2018, five counties adopted the new law: Madera, Napa, Nevada, Sacramento and San Mateo. In 2020, nine additional counties changed their election models to the VCA: Amador, Butte, Calaveras, El Dorado, Fresno, Los Angeles, Mariposa, Orange, Santa Clara, and Tuolumne. In 2022, the number of counties that have transitioned to the VCA grew to 28 with the addition of Alameda, Kings, Marin, Merced, Riverside, San Benito, San Diego, Santa Cruz, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Ventura, and Yolo counties.

In VCA counties, early in-person voting begins as early as May 28. Voters can vote at any county vote center instead of being assigned to a neighborhood polling place. The vote centers are open four to 10 days prior to the election, including weekends. They serve as one-stop shops with accessible voting machines – venues where voters can drop off their VBM ballot, receive a replacement ballot, register to vote, and get help with voting material in multiple languages.

Unregistered voters who miss the close of registration on May 23 will be able to conditionally register to vote at any vote center and cast a provisional ballot through the end of Election Day.

When California policymakers and election officials proposed the Voter’s Choice Act most proponents applauded its benefits, including lowering election administration costs, providing greater convenience and flexibility for voters, and the potential to improve voter turnout.

Recently, California Secretary of State (SOS) Shirley Weber released a report on the implementation of VCA during the 2020 Primary and General Elections.

Key findings of the report include:

VCA counties had higher voter registration rates in the state. The 15 VCA counties accounted for about half of the state’s registered voters in both elections.

Many VCA counties experienced a higher voter turnout compared to their non-VCA counterparts. Turnout in the 2020 General Election across racial groups showed white voters had a higher overall turnout than their non-W\white counterparts. The voter turnout gap for Black voters was 5.2 points, and AAPI voters had a turnout gap of 4.3 points.

Black and AAPI voters turned out at similar rates as the VCA counties’ average, and Latino voters used in-person voting most among all races and ethnicities.

Use of vote-by-mail ballots was the primary choice of voting in the 2020 elections. More voters chose to return their ballot by drop box than by mail. Use of drop boxes decreased after the age of 45 in the Primary Election and age 35 in the General Election.

Voters in VCA counties cast a ballot in-person at a higher rate than voters in non-VCA counties in the General Election (55.1%). For the Primary Election, that number was 46.6%.

In the General Election, voters aged 46-55 voted in person most compared to all other age groups. In both the Primary and General Elections, voters aged 66+ voted in-person least.

VBM ballot rejection rates in VCA counties were similar to VBM ballot rejections statewide. Voters aged 18-25 had the highest ballot rejection rate. Ballot rejection rates decreased as voter age increased in VCA counties.

VBM ballots were rejected (69.3%) mainly due to not being received on time during the Primary Election. But General Election VBM ballots were mainly rejected due to non-matching signatures (56.09%).

Provisional ballot use decreased significantly between the Primary and General Elections.

There were no confirmed instances of voter fraud in both the Primary and General elections in 2020.

Secretary of State’s Recommendations based on the report findings:

Share best practices from counties that have high voter registration rates with counties that have lower registration rates.

Reduce ballot rejection rates through increased voter education.

Continue to work with counties to ensure drop box locations are accessible and convenient to the public.

Increase outreach and education about early in-person voting and other voting options available in VCA counties.

Increase targeted outreach efforts to engage young voters (18-25).

“We have taken away every excuse a person can possibly have as to why they won’t vote,” SOS Weber said recently. “People realize this is going to be easy and it’s comfortable.”

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Digital Issues

Oakland Post: Week of May 25 – 31, 2022

The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post for the week of May 25 – 31, 2022

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The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post for the week of May 25 - 31, 2022

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