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Richmond’s Carrie Lee Moore, Turns 100

She first came to California in 1944 and resided in the City of Alameda and worked at Treasure Island. She said that it rained every day and she had to run for the bus or train. When she experienced an earthquake for the first time, she was so nervous that she left California and went back to Shreveport, LA.

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Carrie Lee Moore/ Unknown

Carrie Lee Moore (known as Nook to her family) was born on May 23, 1921, in Red Bird, OK., to the proud parents of Carrie James and Leonard Moore. She was the youngest of three children.

She first came to California in 1944 and resided in the City of Alameda and worked at Treasure Island. She said that it rained every day and she had to run for the bus or train. When she experienced an earthquake for the first time, she was so nervous that she left California and went back to Shreveport, LA. She thought by that time Shreveport would be paying workers the same wages that she could get in California, but it wasn’t so. 

She returned to California in 1945 and became a member of Star Bethel Baptist Church in Oakland under the leadership of Rev. George Henderson.  There she met the love of her life, Enoch Johnson, and they married on May 11, 1946. Later they moved to Detroit, Mich., because the war had ended while they were in California and if you weren’t in a union, the servicemen got the jobs first. (Her father always promised to take her there and she finally got an opportunity to get there.) She graduated from Kemble Servicing School in 1966 with a Master Certificate.

She resided in Michigan for 38 years and worked for the Cadillac Industry Plant for 34 years as a power machine operator. She also was the pianist for Nazarene Baptist Church in Michigan for 22 years before returning to California in 1984 to help her sister take care of her father, Leonard Moore, who was a member of North Richmond Baptist Church.

She joined North Richmond Baptist Church in 1984 (with her letter from Nazarene Baptist Church) under the leadership of the late Rev. CW Newsome. She has been active in everything at the church including Sunday school, BTU, the Mission, Christ Ministry, Mothers Board, Citizen Group, Brown Bags, choirs, committees, ministering to the sick, wherever she is needed, she is there.

Down through the years she has been a musician for several churches in the area including, Emmaus Baptist Church, Mt. Carmel, EverReady, Bible Way, Shields Convalescent, the Christ Ministry, and still plays for North Richmond Baptist Church.

When asked what keeps her so healthy, she responded, “the Lord.” (Although she walks regularly to get her exercise.)

She got her driver’s license at the age of 70 and drove for 20 plus years until she decided not to renew her license. She is very independent and does not depend on anyone to take her where she wants to go and definitely does not mind walking or taking the bus.

She has taught needle craft and enjoys sewing. As a child, she was an avid basketball player and played ‘corncob’ baseball.

She is a joy to be around and will keep you laughing with all of her funny sayings.

Her favorite scripture is Psalms 1:1-2, “Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful, but his delight is in the law of the LORD; and in his law doth he meditate day and night.”

Her advice to the young is found in 2 Timothy 2:15, “Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not be ashamed, rightly diving the word of truth.”  She also added that whatever you do, keep Christ in your life.

She truly loves the Lord and loves studying His Word.

Bay Area

Spoken Word Offers Aid to Black Men Facing Hardships

Their mission statement highlights that through sharing their lived experiences, members of Black Men Speaks and Men of Color “promote self and communal wellness, recovery, and freedom”.

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Image provided by Black Men Speak website

According to a National Health Survey on Drug Use and Health conducted in 2019 for the African American community, 6.5 million African Americans had a mental illness and/or substance abuse disorder.

These numbers don’t compare to the more in depth statistics on those who receive treatment and who do not and how, specifically, Black men are affected. For a lot of Black men and men of color, access to resources that may aid in mental health or substance abuse treatment are slim because of the influence within their own communities and outside of it to turn their backs on things that are perceived as anything less than the strength they should possess as a man, especially a Black man.

Black Men Speak, INC.(BMS), an international speakers bureau, was founded in 2009 through the Alameda Pool of Consumer Champions with this very notion in mind, that the best way to connect to other Black men who were struggling with mental health and substance abuse was through storytelling of their own struggles.

Three years following Black Men Speaks’ foundation, Men of Color(MOC) speaker’s bureau was established, which allowed them to expand their reach in the community.

Their mission statement highlights that through sharing their lived experiences, members of Black Men Speaks and Men of Color “promote self and communal wellness, recovery, and freedom”.

The stories that are told are set in the present day and feature unique challenges of loss, trauma, social and family issues and community violence and the importance of faith on the road to overall wellness & recovery.

Besides aiding their fellow men through connection in storytelling, BMS offers resources that help with employment, housing, homeless prevention, mentoring and peer support and training for presentation and public speaking.

Alongside these resources and mentoring, they make sure to do their part in advocating and assertively addressing other issues within their communities that have a direct impact on the African American community.

Black Men Speak is located in Oakland at 303 Hegenberger Road in Suite 210. Hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 510-969-5086 or email 1blackmenspeak@gmail.com.

 

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Activism

Jasmine Market Encourage Unity in Marin City

During the event, Jong Lee, Caitilin Damacion, and Tammy Lai discussed how to raise the awareness of the various ethnic groups to each other in Marin City. A mobile clinic provided free COVID-19 vaccines.

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Top: The Jasmine Market at the St. Andrew Presbyterian Church. Bottom: Jong Lee, Caitilin Damacion, Tammy Lai (Photos by Godfrey Lee)

The First Marin City’s Jasmine Market was an inclusive, outdoor market celebrating Asian joy and intercultural solidarity in honor of Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month in May.

It was hosted by the Marin City Community Development Corporation (MCCDC) and was held at the St. Andrew Presbyterian Church in Marin City on May 28, 2021.

A Marin City Librarian read an AAPI story. Sammy Brionnes gave a musical performance. Natalie Nong performed a Spoken Word poem.

During the event, Jong Lee, Caitilin Damacion, and Tammy Lai discussed how to raise the awareness of the various ethnic groups to each other in Marin City. A mobile clinic provided free COVID-19 vaccines.

Lee is the director of Women’s Rights and Peace Bay Area, and a board member for the Asian American Alliance of Marin. She is involved in advocating for ethnic studies in the Marin County School District and is working to spread awareness of the “comfort women” from Korea and other Asian nations. These women were forced to serve as sexual slaves for Japanese soldiers during WWII.

Tammy Lai is the CEO at Foundation for Justice and Peace (jpf.world).

Damacion, who lives in the East Bay, is the Micro-Enterprise Program Manager at the MCCDC.

During the discussion, Lee says that God created people in his image. We need to treat people in the image of God.

Lee really wants to see Asians, especially women, integrate with the other minorities, such as Koreans, who can become culturally isolated, and spoke to the need to bridge and understand other ethnic groups. “We need to step forward to meet each other halfway, and to reach out to understand each other,” Lee said.

Lai says that we have this opportunity, as we question ourselves in this cultural landscape, to build bridges. Communities become healthier when its members take one step toward one another to understand, listen and to build something better together.

Damacion, who is Filipino and mixed-raced, feels very strongly about building connections that are positive and beneficial to a community. Through her work with the MCCDC, she will work to advance diversity in Marin City, and will shed a light on the beauty she sees in Marin City and how people in the community took care of each other for generations.

Lai’s family immigrated from China to America after the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882. Her family history has brought her a deeper awareness of her identity. It becomes important to carry these conversations forward and share them with others.

“We all have our stories and should be open to tell them. There is nothing new under human history so we should learn to share them. You become much closer to each other,” says Lee.

For more information, go to www.marincitycdc.org/jasmine-market

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Bay Area

Vice Mayor: Business Group Wants to Buy Coliseum, Attract WNBA Team

The group will provide additional details of its effort at a news conference at 11:00 a.m. Friday at a site to be determined.

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Oakland Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan.

Oakland Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan said a local business group has made serious inroads to buy the city’s 50% stake in the Oakland Coliseum complex and to bring a WNBA team to the city.
Kaplan’s office shared a news release Monday about the effort by the African American Sports and Entertainment Group.

Kaplan said the group is in negotiations with the Oakland-Alameda Joint Powers Authority, has submitted a formal proposal to WNBA officials, and has submitted a term sheet to the city, which the City Council’s rules committee recently voted to advance to the full council for a vote.

The group will provide additional details of its effort at a news conference at 11:00 a.m. Friday at a site to be determined.

“I am pleased that there is such great interest in doing an important development at the Oakland Coliseum that will provide jobs, revenue and community positivity,” Kaplan said. “My goal is to help this process move forward before the summer recess.”

Kaplan said the group has the backing of more than 30 community groups of faith-based institutions, labor organizations, civic leaders, and job development organizations. She did not name the groups

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