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FAMU Law student accepted to EPA Law Clerk Honors Program

SOUTH FLORIDA TIMES — The Summer Law Clerk Honors Program is a full-time, unpaid assignment for a minimum of 11 weeks. Students undergo a background check and are provided agency credentials. Students participate in a comprehensive orientation that includes an overview on confidentiality, ethics, and other tips for a successful clerkship.

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By South Florida Times

ORLANDO, Fla – Florida A&M University (FAMU) student Bria Calvin has been accepted into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Enforcement Training Institute (NETI)’s 2019 Summer Law Clerk Honors Program.

The Summer Law Clerk Honors Program is a full-time, unpaid assignment for a minimum of 11 weeks. Students undergo a background check and are provided agency credentials. Students participate in a comprehensive orientation that includes an overview on confidentiality, ethics, and other tips for a successful clerkship.

“Bria’s Environmental Protection Agency Honors Program clerkship is just one example of the wonderful experiential opportunities available to our students through our Field Placement Program,” said FAMU Law Director of Legal Clinics and field Placement, Darryl Jones.

“Students can gain invaluable experience in very prestigious legal venues in Orlando, throughout the state and even throughout the country.”

The Law Clerk Honors Program also includes a series of unique, specialized training sessions on environmental laws and how they are enforced. Offered once or twice a week during the summer, these 30to 90-minute seminars are taught by top EPA staff and provide first-hand knowledge from the agency’s leading enforcement experts.

“This is an exciting opportunity and I look forward to learning from top environmental protection experts during this summer clerkship in Washington, DC,” said Calvin, who is a first-year law student from New Orleans, LA.

EPA is a federal government agency. NETI is responsible for training lawyers, inspectors, investigators and technical experts in the enforcement of the nation’s environmental laws. As part of the Law Clerk Honors Program, law students are placed in various offices within EPA’ s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance and the Office of Suspension and Debarment.

For other information visit law.famu.edu.

This article originally appeared in the South Florida Times. 

Activism

Vernon Jordan, Former National Urban League President, Dead at 85

Jordan was the former president of the National Urban League and became a close adviser to Pres. Bill Clinton during his administration. A civil rights activist, Jordan also consulted former Pres. Barack Obama.

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In this March 3, 2011 photo, Vernon Jordan attends the 40th Anniversary Gala for “A Mind Is A Terrible Thing ToWaste” Campaign at The New York Marriott Marquis. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Getty Images)

Civil rights leader, Democratic strategist and presidential insider Vernon Jordan died at his home in Wash., D.C., Monday evening at age 85. His cause of death was not disclosed.

Jordan was the former president of the National Urban League and became a close adviser to Pres. Bill Clinton during his administration. A civil rights activist, Jordan also consulted former Pres. Barack Obama.

A native of Atlanta, Ga., Jordan graduated from DePauw University in Indiana in 1957, where he was the only Black student in a class of 400. He detailed his experience as an undergrad in Robert Penn Warren‘s 1965 book, Who Speaks for the Negro?

Jordan went on to graduate from Howard University School of Law in 1960 and was a prominent member of Omega Psi Phi and Sigma Pi Phi fraternities.

At one time a field director for the NAACP, Jordan’s passing was noted by Derrick Johnson, the current president of the organization. “Today, the world lost an influential figure in the fight for civil rights and American politics, Vernon Jordan,” Johnson said in a statement early Tuesday. “An icon to the world and a lifelong friend to the NAACP, his contribution to moving our society toward justice is unparalleled.”

“In 2001, Jordan received the NAACP’s Spingarn Medal for a lifetime of social justice activism,” said Johnson. “His exemplary life will shine as a guiding light for all that seek truth and justice for all people.”

On Twitter, fellow Georgian Stacey Abrams remembered Jordan as well. Mourning the passage of my friend, the extraordinary Vernon Jordan. He battled the demons of voter suppression and racial degradation, winning more than he lost. He brought others with him. And left a map so more could find their way. Love to his family. Travel on with God’s grace,” she said.

Journalist Jonathan Alter praised Jordan’s legacy. “Vernon Jordan’s epic journey from Jim Crow Georgia to the civil rights movement to the pinnacle of the American establishment is a classic American story,” Alter said. He was also one of the most engaging and charismatic people I’ve ever known—and a gifted storyteller on a summer afternoon.

In May of 1980, Jordan was shot outside of an Indiana hotel. As he recovered, Jordan was visited by then-President Jimmy Carter. The president’s visit and the shooting became the very first story covered on CNN, then the nation’s brand new, 24-hour cable news network.

After his time as an adviser to the Clinton White House, Jordan served on the board of several major corporations, including Revlon, Sara Lee, Corning, Xerox and RJR Nabisco.

His 2001 memoir, Vernon Can Read!: A Memoir, won the Best Nonfiction Book from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.

In 2017, in one of his last major appearances, Jordan was the commencement speaker at Syracuse University.

Jordan leaves to cherish his memory his wife Ann Dibble Jordan, daughter Vickee Jordan Adams and seven grandchildren.

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Black History

Hallmark Mahogany Announces Giveaway of One Million Cards in Celebration of Black History Month

consumers can visit Hallmark.com/ShareMahoganyCards to request a free three-pack of Hallmark Mahogany greeting cards to share with friends and family. Through culturally authentic designs and bold words of affirmation, Hallmark Mahogany seeks to help consumers honor the past, celebrate the uniqueness of Black culture and deeply connect with loved ones.

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KANSAS CITY, Mo.Feb. 3, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Hallmark Mahogany, the greeting card brand that has honored and celebrated Black culture for more than 30 years, today announced the launch of a giveaway of one million greeting cards in celebration of Black History Month.

Starting today, consumers can visit Hallmark.com/ShareMahoganyCards to request a free three-pack of Hallmark Mahogany greeting cards to share with friends and family. Through culturally authentic designs and bold words of affirmation, Hallmark Mahogany seeks to help consumers honor the past, celebrate the uniqueness of Black culture and deeply connect with loved ones.

Included within the pack is a greeting card from the newest collection in the Mahogany line, Uplifted & Empowered. Appropriate for everyday sending, Uplifted & Empowered captures the beauty, significance and power of Black lives. Themes within the collection include pride in self/community, support, empowerment, inspiration, faith and solidarity.

Hallmark Mahogany’s one-million-card giveaway is the latest in a series of greeting card giveaways designed to help consumers connect with others. In total, more than five million cards have been given away within the last year. The card giveaways began in the early days of the COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and have proven to be a great way to help people connect and rediscover the amazing benefits of cards.

“Black History Month is not only a time of reverence, it’s a joyous recognition of the spirit of the Black community and the contributions that countless Black Americans have made throughout the years,” said Lindsey Roy, chief marketing officer, Hallmark Cards. “That celebratory spirit is at the heart of the Mahogany brand 365 days a year, and our hope is that this giveaway of one million cards spreads even more encouragement, hope and pride during Black History Month and beyond.”

For more than 30 years, Hallmark Mahogany’s gifts and greetings have enhanced emotional connections between families and friends by capturing what’s most beloved and valued about Black culture. The full selection includes cards for birthdaysValentine’s DayMother’s DayFather’s DayChristmas and everyday occasions including weddingsnew babies, anniversaries and HBCU graduations. With the addition of Uplifted & Empowered, even more cards are now available to affirm the strength, pride and beauty of the Black community.

Hallmark Mahogany’s gifts and greetings are available at Hallmark.com, as well as select retailers and Hallmark Gold Crown® stores. See stories of appreciation and celebration at Hallmark.com/ShareYourStory and share your own using #ShareMahoganyCards and #CardsDoMore.

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Coronavirus

Biden Signs Series of Executive Actions on Racial Justice

“For too long we’ve allowed a narrow, cramped view of the promise of this nation to fester,” Biden said in a speech ahead of the signings on Tuesday. “When we lift each other up, we’re all lifted up. And the corollary is true as well — when any one of us is held down, we’re all held back.”

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President Joe Biden, Photo Courtesy The White House

Pres. Joe Biden this week signed a series of executive actions aimed at advancing racial equity in the United States.

The list included an executive order directing the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development to address racial bias in federal housing programs; another order phasing out federal contracts with private prisons; a memorandum recommitting the government to respecting tribal sovereignty of Native American nations; and another memo directing the Dept. of Justice to collect better data on hate crimes against people of Asian and Pacific Island descent, which have risen during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Biden cited the death of George Floyd, the Black man murdered by Minneapolis police last May and whose killing reinvigorated the Black Lives Matter movement, in announcing the actions, referring to Floyd’s murder as “the knee on the neck of justice.” Notably, however, none of the actions announced were related to police violence. Additional action on policing is expected from the administration in the coming weeks.

“For too long we’ve allowed a narrow, cramped view of the promise of this nation to fester,” Biden said in a speech ahead of the signings on Tuesday. “When we lift each other up, we’re all lifted up. And the corollary is true as well — when any one of us is held down, we’re all held back.”

The move to end contracting with private prisons was applauded by many civil rights advocates. Biden called it “a first step to stop corporations from profiting off of incarceration.”

Still, Biden remains at odds with what has become a core demand for the Black Lives Matter movement: to divest from policing and instead spend the money on community programs like housing, health care, and education.

Biden says he supports increased federal oversight of the police but also wants to increase funding for the police, especially for community policing programs.

The memo affirming tribal sovereignty was also widely celebrated by Native American activists. Historically, the federal government, backed by the courts, has ignored legal treaties signed with Native American nations, bulldozing over tribal rights and failing to consult tribes on federal policy that affects them. “To do this one week in office really speaks to [Biden’s] commitment to Indian Country,” Nikki Pitre, executive director of the Center for Native American Youth, told The Hill.

Biden has nominated New Mexico Rep. Deb Haaland, who is Native American, to be Secretary of the Interior. If confirmed by the Senate, which she is expected to be, Haaland will become the first person of Native descent to hold the position and would be in charge of oversight of federal lands and waterways, plus the animals, plants, and natural resources located there. She would also manage the federal government’s relationship with tribal nations.

Biden on Tuesday also recommitted to working with Congress to pass legislation to invest in historically Black colleges, and said he planned to triple investment in schools that serve a majority of low-income students.

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