Connect with us

Oakland A's

A’s Blanked By The Phillies

Published

on

Oakland, CA – After taking game one of a three-game series last night, the A’s got shutout by the Phillies making the road to the pennant race a difficult one. Unable to provide the run support needed to back Drew Pomeranz, Oakland fell back into their offensive slump.

The A’s held Philadelphia scoreless through six innings. But the bullpen allowed a double to Cody Asche and that sparked the offense for the Phillies. Freddy Galvis blasted a two-run homer to right field making it a 2-0 game. Pomeranz tossed five shutout innings, allowing one hit, two walks and six strikeouts.

“I was trying to throw a fastball in and it just kind of tailed over the middle of the plate, didn’t really have that sink to it, and he put a good swing on it,” said Dan Otero who gave up the home run.
Pomeranz struggled in the first but calmed down to get out of the jam. He loaded the bases when he allowed an infield single to Maikel Franco, walked Chase Utley and hit Marlon Byrd with a pitch. After settling down, he struck out Darin Ruf to end the threat stranding three.

“When we start nitpicking about one pitch, it means you’re not doing anything offensively to help out the other end,” Oakland’s manager Bob Melvin said. “That’s what it’s been like lately. One or two pitches within a game have been magnified because we’re not giving them enough run support.”

“It’s been almost three weeks, I was just trying to find my rhythm out there,” said Pomeranz. “It’s been awhile since I pitched in a game, even longer since I started.”

Despite being thrown into the lineup Pomeranz did a good job bouncing back from the first inning. He replaced Jason Hammel who was out for the birth of his child. Pomeranz made his first appearance since Sept 2 and his first start since Aug 27. He has a 0.60 ERA over the first three innings of a game and did not allow a run through five frames.

The A’s had a few opportunities but failed to drive in any runs. Both Adam Dunn and Josh Reddick knocked two bloop singles in the second putting two on with one out. Jed Lowrie’s single up the middle loaded the bases but Derek Norris hit into a double play to ended the inning stranding three.

“I just didn’t let it travel far enough to hit in the hole where I was trying to hit it for a base hit in right, and I just hit it right at him,” Norris said. No excuses. Just gotta be better in situational hitting, get a ball more elevated next time.

Reddick leadoff the fifth out running pitcher Jerome Williams to first base and was safe. But Lowrie hit into a double play followed by Norris grounding out to end the inning. Williams pitched seven frames, gave up four hits, one walk and struck out three. Williams is the first pitcher to to earn three wins against the same opponent in a season as a member of three different teams.

“I don’t think anything changed after the second,” said Williams. “It’s just I had a couple pitches I left over the plate and I wasn’t attacking the zone, keeping the ball down, getting key ground balls when I needed them.”

The Phillies extended their lead 3-0 with an insurance run when Byrd hit a RBI single after Utley hit a double in the eighth. Despite Oakland’s loss they still lead both the Royals and Mariners by a 1/2 game for 1st in the American League Wild Card.

Activism

COMMENTARY: U.S. Grant for New Waterfront Ballpark Would Help A’s Far More Than Oakland

There are numerous examples of sports deals failing to deliver the fiscal returns promised by local governments: the Atlanta Braves stadium, where office buildings penciled in to pay for the stadium were never built; the University of Louisville’s KFC Yum! Center left the city $28 million in debt and the Washington Nationals’ failure to build 46,000 square feet of promised commercial and retail space alongside the baseball stadium. 

Published

on

Port of Oakland file photo.
Port of Oakland file photo.

By Kitty Kelly Epstein

Once in a generation — if we’re lucky — we see huge federal investment in infrastructure.

Thanks to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Mega Grant program, communities across the country have been asked to identify their highest-priority projects in the first round of long-needed transportation investment funding to help make U.S. transit safer, more efficient and resilient to future challenges.

But not all projects hit that mark.

Here in the Bay Area, several major transformative projects have applied for Mega Grant funding and are worthy of this kind of investment. Contra Costa County’s 680 Forward project, for example, would improve mobility along Interstate 680, the backbone corridor for the region’s supply chain and commuters, linking airports, business centers and seaports.

Then, there’s Oakland: Mayor Libby Schaaf’s administration applied for a $182 million Mega Grant to help fund what it describes as a “waterfront mobility hub” at Howard Terminal in Jack London Square. In reality, though, the grant would help billionaire Oakland A’s owner John Fisher develop his $12 billion proposal for luxury condos and a stadium far more than it would the public.

The Mega Grant program, which is currently reviewing initial proposals, should reject the proposal.

The problems with such an application are obvious and numerous. First, even if the city got a Mega Grant, Oakland’s City Council would need to approve its use. The mayor has no role in that process and so far, the City Council has yet to see a development agreement or receive the independent financial analysis it requested early this year.

The Council has, however, received an update from City staff that there is nowhere near enough money to finance the project. According to a September informational memo from Assistant City Administrator Elizabeth Lake, the cost to the public would, “significantly exceed the A’s previous estimate.” How much that cost will increase and how the city plans to pay for it is unclear.

Moreover, if a proposal with actual terms is ever presented, it will be after Schaaf and several current Council members are out of office. It is possible — perhaps even likely — given the financial uncertainties, that the new City Council will not approve the project, and if it does, there are multiple lawsuits pending and additional regulatory hurdles to cross.

The Mega Grant criteria appear to require that proposed projects clear the likely hurdles they might encounter along the way. The Howard Terminal proposal does not meet that criterion.

Of course, it is also possible that Fisher, for whom this taxpayer largesse is intended, will still end up moving his team to Las Vegas.

According to a poll last December, 46% of Oakland residents do not support using public money for this project, compared to 37% who do. The poll also found that even among A’s fans, who comprise a 53% majority of the electorate, support is tepid at best.

Oakland residents already have real transportation concerns that the city needs to address: traffic congestion, along with its impact on climate and public health; deferred maintenance of roadways; gaps in the availability of reliable public transportation; the efficient movement of goods through the supply chain, including at the Port of Oakland.

But residents, stakeholders and experts were never asked how they might want to spend a Mega Grant. No hearings; no webinars; no surveys — not even consideration for existing projects in Oakland’s Capital Improvement Plan.

And, ironically, this proposal is chasing transportation dollars for a project that nearly all the transportation stakeholders at the port, including those running container trucks and trains through our city, agree will make congestion and safety situations worse.

In the absence of the independent financial analysis promised earlier this year, port stakeholders commissioned an independent report from Nola Agha, a professor of sports management at the University of San Francisco and expert on stadium projects. Agha’s report concluded that revenue projections for the development are overestimated, project costs are underestimated, and indirect costs are not accounted for.

There are numerous examples of sports deals failing to deliver the fiscal returns promised by local governments: the Atlanta Braves stadium, where office buildings penciled in to pay for the stadium were never built; the University of Louisville’s KFC Yum! Center left the city $28 million in debt and the Washington Nationals’ failure to build 46,000 square feet of promised commercial and retail space alongside the baseball stadium.

Here in Oakland, much of the pro forma for the Howard Terminal development relies on revenues from office, retail and high-end condos — all of which have a risky outlook in the post-pandemic economy. These critical elements of the project financing may never get built.

Significant opportunities to improve and build up our region with the help of the federal government are few and far between. Using them to support a private development for which there is no approved development agreement is a bad idea. The City of Oakland’s Mega Grant application sacrifices critical funding for the Bay Area’s real infrastructure needs.

Kitty Kelly Epstein is a scholar, an Oakland resident, host of a radio show and the author of three books on Oakland and urban affairs.

Continue Reading

Activism

OP-ED: Just Say No to the A’s at Howard Terminal

The voters said they wanted the right to weigh in on whether to spend public funds on the Howard Terminal project. The Council refused to place a measure on the ballot, saying no public funds would be spent and they preferred a financial review before such a vote could be scheduled. But the City never did the financial review. 

Published

on

Paul Cobb, publisher, Post News Group
Paul Cobb, Publisher, Post News Group

By Paul Cobb

What an absolute mess!  The City of Oakland promotes a baseball stadium and luxury real estate development at Howard Terminal for the Oakland A’s, but it has not completed a financial analysis of risk and benefits associated with the project. It does not know what the project will cost, how it will be paid for, how many public dollars will be spent, and how much the City is at risk for anticipated cost overruns that are likely because of changing economic conditions due to inflation.

This situation is worse than the Raiders debacle at the Oakland Coliseum. You would think that once burned, the City would make sure that would not happen again.

But here we are.

Public funds from the city, county, state, and federal government will exceed $1 billion.  Worse, because of changing economic conditions, the City now admits for the first time that anticipated cost overruns could pose a risk to the city of Oakland. The City Administrator won’t say how much is at stake, because he doesn’t want to “throw numbers around.” But a source close to the A’s said some estimates have pegged the cost to the city to be more than $300 million.

Before we go further, let’s be reminded how we got here. Last spring, the voters of Oakland asked the City Council to place an advisory vote on the November ballot on whether any public funds should be spent on billionaire John Fisher’s baseball and luxury real-estate deal at Howard Terminal. That request was denied.

On April 28, 2022, Councilmember Noel Gallo convinced the City Council to unanimously vote to have an independent analysis done on the risks and benefits of the project.  The analysis was scheduled to be presented to the public on Sept. 20. When the date came around for the report, the City had not done the analysis even though five months had passed since it was approved.

On Sept. 20, after the meeting started, staff sent out an e-mail with an attached 18-page report that was chock full of new data and a dire warning that “significant increases in costs are anticipated and there are not yet sufficient funds currently in-hand to cover the estimated costs of the off-site infrastructure (on the project). As a result, under the current structure, there is a risk that the City would be required to fund the remaining costs as well as any cost overruns, each of which may prove significant.”

Councilmembers were stunned. They had been assured that the City would have no risks, but the report included an admission that the City could be at risk and the amounts may prove significant. Councilmember Carroll Fife asked how much was at stake. The City Administrator refused to give an estimate.

So, again, here we are.

The voters said they wanted the right to weigh in on whether to spend public funds on the Howard Terminal project. The Council refused to place a measure on the ballot, saying no public funds would be spent and they preferred a financial review before such a vote could be scheduled. But the City never did the financial review.

This process has been a disaster. Promises made have been reneged on. Assurances that no public funds would be used, and that the City would not have risks turned out to be false. Oakland voters demanded the right to be heard on whether public finds should be spent, but they were turned down.

This is the same kind of incompetence and lack of transparency displayed during the Raiders deal. But the amounts at risk on this deal make the money spent on the Raiders look like chump change.

The Oakland City Council needs to put this on pause and figure out all the details before anything moves forward. Now, more than ever, City Council must insist on an independent financial analysis on the costs and risks of the project. Since public funds are clearly being spent, and the administration now admits Oakland has financial risks, City Council needs to revisit the question of letting the voters weigh in. As Councilmember Dan Kalb said previously, if that requires a special election, so be it.

Is the Council woke yet? They have been bullied, misled, and disrespected in this entire process. Transparency be damned! Will they finally say “enough,” or will they continue to move forward with their eyes wide shut?

It is time to Just Say No!

Continue Reading

Activism

IN MEMORIAM: Oakland’s Own Bill Russell, 88, Greatest Athlete/Civil Rights Activist Ever (Part 1)

NNPA NEWSWIRE — William Felton Russell was born on Feb. 12, 1934, in Monroe, La., and his family moved to West Oakland in 1942 when he was 8. His father found work on the waterfront and in the Bay Area shipyards in the middle of World War II. They instilled in him a history of racial and family pride that helped him survive in a racially discriminatory Boston environment while playing for the Boston Celtics.

Published

on

As the first-ranked and highest respected Black sportsman, Bill Russell used his status to lead the nation’s leading Black athletes which included Jim Brown, Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul Jabbar) and many others to support Muhammad Ali’s stance against the Vietnam War.
As the first-ranked and highest respected Black sportsman, Bill Russell used his status to lead the nation’s leading Black athletes which included Jim Brown, Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul Jabbar) and many others to support Muhammad Ali’s stance against the Vietnam War.

By Paul Cobb, Post News Group Publisher

Bill Russell, the center of attention in professional basketball, died at 88 after becoming the most decorated athlete in all of the team sports in the United States.

The star of the Boston Celtics from 1956-1969, he changed the way basketball was played by applying his rare combination of basketball and track and field athleticism to fashion a defense-centered dominance. In a sport where one’s ability to score points was prized, he reversed the focus by making defensive thinking to prevent others from scoring.

He died on July 31, after more than 70 years of basketball and civil rights activism.

William Felton Russell was born on Feb. 12, 1934, in Monroe, La., and his family moved to West Oakland in 1942 when he was 8. His father found work on the waterfront and in the Bay Area shipyards in the middle of World War II. They instilled in him a history of racial and family pride that helped him survive in a racially discriminatory Boston environment while playing for the Boston Celtics.

In his early years his home was only three blocks east from Ron Dellums, Oakland’s first Black congressman, and just three blocks west from Frank Robinson, Oakland’s first Black Major League Baseball coach.

While living near Ninth and Center streets, he learned early on that one must fight for honor, dignity, and respect by never backing down from any challenge whether through fisticuffs or verbal slights.

He was mentored at Defremery Park and Recreation Center by the late Dorothy Seale Pitts and George Scotlan along with Bill Patterson, who now serves as an EBMUD Director, to stay centered on what mattered.

Even though he pioneered greatness as an athlete and as a scholar/athlete/civil rights activist who fought to achieve dignity and respect for African Americans, his path to recognition and honor was not easy because was not considered good enough to crack the starting five basketball Warriors lineup at McClymonds High School in West Oakland.

He never stopped trying and practicing with his teammates who were better shooters and scorers. But, at 6-foot 10 inches, he was taller and could jump higher and played defense above the rim. He even became the Warriors’ mascot who created a stunning nimble artistic dance routine as the team’s mascot.

(His achievements attracted many who sought to follow in his footsteps with stylized dance routines that were featured during halftime breaks.)

His mother died when he was 12, never seeing Bill win two state prep titles and two national college crowns at the University of San Francisco after being ignored by many colleges because he was Black.

He was a five-time NBA Most Valuable Player and captain of the 1956 U.S. Gold Medal team at the Melbourne Olympics. He drastically altered defensive play by excelling in rebounding, shot-blocking, and passing to ignite a fast-paced style of play.

He won eight consecutive NBA titles from 1959-1966. As a player-coach in his final three seasons, Russell was the first Black coach in North American sports and the first to win a title, doing so in 1968 and again in his 1969 farewell campaign.

He was the first Black player inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1975 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011 by Barack Obama, America’s first Black president, for his civil rights and basketball achievements.

Russell was first among Oakland’s and the country’s athletic achievers. His USF team was the first major college to start three Black players. His Celtics team was the first to start five Black players. He was the first to become a player-coach. And he was the first player-coach to win an NBA title. He was first to be invited by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to speak at the 1963 March on Washington. He was the first athlete to utilize his celebrity by traveling to Mississippi to use sports to bring racial healing after the KKK killed NAACP leader Medgar Evers.

As the first-ranked and highest respected Black sportsman, he used his status to lead the nation’s leading Black athletes which included Jim Brown, Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul Jabbar) and many others to support Muhammad Ali’s stance against the Vietnam War.

He always remembered his friends and mentors here in Oakland. Whenever he traveled to Oakland, he would often check in with Maxine Willis Ussery and reminisce about the days when his family would visit her family’s cleaning establishment.

She said he was protective of her and wanted to meet and give his approval to any of her dates and he insisted that he go to dinner with her and fiance Wilfred Ussery to give his approval. Maxine is now the office manager at the Post News Group (Oakland Post).

He paid one of his highest compliments to Bill Patterson for guiding and counseling him since his high school days. He said Patterson helped him understand that he must never allow himself to be a victim. He was proud of Coach Ben Tapscott, the McClymonds’ basketball coach, who not only continued to maintain the school’s tradition as the winningest high school in the country with an emphasis on academic achievements.

He invited Tapscott to share the glory with him when he was inducted and honored by the University of San Francisco.

In an interview with Russell and former WNBA Coach Nancy Lieberman, just months before his passing, he was making plans to donate a jointly signed basketball to salute the achievement of Oakland’s African American Sports and Entertainment Group for purchasing the Oakland Coliseum.

Bill Patterson, Geoffrey Pete, Ben Tapscott, Joe Ellis, Jumoke Hinton, Rev. Gerald Agee, Ray Bobbitt, Arif Khatib, Virtual Murrell, Gary Reeves, Nancy Lieberman, Jonathan Jones, Al Attles, Jr. and many others have asked The Post to put them on the task force to gather the list and honor the Bay Area’s historic cavalcade of Athlete/Activists who also became “firsts” in their respective sports. For those who want to volunteer to be included, please contact Maxine Ussery @510-287-8200 or mussery@postnewsgroup.com.

“We must find a way to honor our highest achievers,” said Bill Patterson and Ben Tapscott

Continue Reading

Subscribe to receive news and updates from the Oakland Post

* indicates required

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending