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The Philadelphia Tribune

Women’s History Month: Civil rights icon C. Delores Tucker left trailblazing legacy

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — That determination of C. DeLores Tucker fueled a lifetime of activism for advancing the rights of Black people and women.

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By Michael D’Onofrio

Leading a delegation of Philadelphia pastors to the bloody 1965 march in Selma, Alabama alongside Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. filled C. DeLores Tucker with renewed energy to continue the fight for civil rights for African Americans, recalled her husband, William.

But William Tucker said his wife, who died in 2005, already had been fully committed to combating injustice wherever she encountered it.

“She came back [from the march in 1965] more determined than ever that we had to do whatever is necessary to change things to end segregation and discrimination in this country,” he said, “but I think she was born with that determination.”

That determination of C. DeLores Tucker fueled a lifetime of activism for advancing the rights of Black people and women.

William Tucker, who continues to live in Philadelphia, said his wife “always had an idea about how to eliminate some injustice in society. She would wake up with that on her mind.”

C. DeLores Tucker “represents a generation that changed America,” Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. said in his eulogy at Tucker’s funeral at the Deliverance Evangelistic Church in North Philadelphia in October 2005. Her funeral drew hundreds, including former civil rights activist and U.S. Rep. from Georgia John Lewis and Vice President Al Gore.

Born Oct. 4, 1927, she was the 10th of 11 children and the daughter of a North Philadelphia pastor. She grew up in Germantown, attended the High School for Girls and then went on to Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania.

C. DeLores Tucker was the first Black woman to serve as Pennsylvania secretary of state and was a driving force behind expanding voting rights, including lowering the voting age to 18. She initiated the first Commission on the Status of Women in Pennsylvania and was responsible for the appointment of more women and Blacks to boards, commissions and judgeships than ever before in the state’s history.

C. DeLores Tucker was fired as secretary of state in 1977 over accusations that she used state employees to write speeches she was paid to give.

A few years later, in 1984, C. DeLores Tucker and U.S. Rep. Shirley Chisholm founded what’s now known as the National Congress of Black Women, a nonprofit and nonpartisan organization that fights for the advancement of women of color in politics, education and society.

Advocating for educational issues for children and preparing them for college were among her lifelong goals, said E. Faye Williams, president of the National Congress of Black Women.

Williams, who worked alongside C. DeLores Tucker and took the helm of the National Congress of Black Women from her in the early 2000s, said her legacy also includes getting more African Americans and women of color elected to office.

“She wanted women to be more highly involved in the political process and she also wanted them to take a greater role in helping in our community in a nonprofit way so that we got more children to go to college,” said Williams, 77.

Beyond the civil rights movement, C. DeLores Tucker drew national attention in the late 1990s for her zealous activism against what was then called “gangsta rap” or “porno rap.”

C. DeLores Tucker believed the lyrics of rap music that glorified violence, misogyny, and drug use were destroying the Black community. She targeted artists — Tupac Shakur and Eminem — and record labels alike about the issue.

Among her other accomplishments, C. DeLores Tucker was the first Black president of the National Federation of Democratic Women; an original organizer of the DNC Black Caucus and the Women’s Caucus; and the first woman vice president of the Pennsylvania chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, where she was a prodigious fundraiser.

In Philadelphia she inspired and sparked many to pursue politics, including former Mayors W. Wilson Goode Sr. and John Street, Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, and former Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco.

Before her death, C. DeLores Tucker named State Sen. Sharif Street, D-3, as a “torchbearer,” symbolizing that he carries on her legacy and that of the MLK Association. Mariska Bogle — daughter of Robert Bogle, president and CEO of The Philadelphia Tribune — was the only other person the civil rights activist named as a torchbearer.

Always well-dressed, C. DeLores Tucker was known for her signature turbans. She did not have any children with her husband but they raised numerous nieces and nephews, among them Captilda “Cappy” Lane.

Lane, 67, of Philadelphia said her aunt, who also raised her brother, instilled in her a sense of religion and faith.

“She was such a fearless individual,” Lane said, “and always taught me to honor and respect people and to have self-respect.”

This article originally appeared in The Philadelphia Tribune

#NNPA BlackPress

Miami Times, Philadelphia Tribune, St. Louis American – Big Winners During NNPA’s 2019 Merit Awards

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Brenda Andrews Publisher of the New Journal and Guide newspaper in Norfolk, Va., won the coveted Publisher of the Year Award at the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) annual convention in Cincinnati on Thursday, June 27.

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New Journal and Guide’s Brenda Andrews Earns Publisher of Year

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Brenda Andrews publisher of the New Journal and Guide newspaper in Norfolk, Va., won the coveted Publisher of the Year Award at the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) annual convention in Cincinnati on Thursday, June 27.

Andrews, who hosted last year’s convention, was greeted with a standing ovation as she ascended the platform to accept the award from NNPA Foundation Chair Amelia Ashley-Ward, the publisher of the San Francisco Sun Reporter.

The Miami Times (10 awards), Philadelphia Tribune (9), and St. Louis American (7) were the biggest winners of the night.

Included in the Miami Times’ awards was the John B. Russwurm Trophy that’s presented to the newspaper that accumulates the most points in NNPAF’s annual journalism competition.

During the ceremony, Ashley-Ward asked for prayers for Miami Times Publisher Rachel Reeves whom Ashley-Ward announced was gravely ill.

Westside Gazette Publisher Bobby Henry accepted the awards on behalf of the Miami Times and pledged to personally deliver them to Reeves and her family.

In 1827, Russwurm co-founded Freedom’s Journal with Samuel E. Cornish, the country’s first African American-owned and operated newspaper with the credo: “We wish to plead our own cause. Too long have others spoken for us.”

The awards were hosted by MillerCoors.

Other NNPA partners and sponsors include: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; General Motors; Pfizer Rare Disease; RAI Services Company; Ford; Macy’s; Wells Fargo; P&G; Volkswagen; American Petroleum Institute; AARP; Ascension; AmeriHealth Caritas; Fifth Third Bank; and the National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation (NNPAF).

California Sen. Kamala Harris opened the program via a video message of support and encouragement.

“Thank you for the work that you do … a free and independent Black Press is critical,” Harris said.

The 2020 presidential hopeful who received the 2018 NNPA Newsmaker of the Year Award during a ceremony last year, couldn’t attend the event because she was in Florida participating in the second night of debates for Democratic candidates.

During the ceremony, Ford and General Motors formally announced scholarship awards while Kerri Watkins, the publisher of the New York Daily Challenge, handed out the George Curry Award in honor of the late Black Press editor.

Among the highlights were the award for Best Editorial, which went to the Miami Times.

The St. Louis American and the Los Angeles Sentinel finished second and third respectively in that category.

The St. Louis American earned first place in the Best Column Writing category while the Miami Times finished second and the Michigan Chronicle third.

The Philadelphia Tribune took the top prize in the Community Service Award category while the Michigan Chronicle finished second and the Miami Times third.

The Final Call earned top honors for Best News Story, while the Birmingham Times finished second and Texas Metro News earned the third place prize.

The Birmingham Times earned first place for Best Feature Story while the Atlanta Voice and Houston Defender finished second and third.

In the Best News Picture category, the Richmond Free Press won first place followed by the New Pittsburgh Courier and the Philadelphia Tribune.

The Los Angeles Sentinel won top honors in the Best Editorial Cartoon category while the Washington Afro-American won second and third place.

In the Best Layout Design Category, the Birmingham Times won first place while the Philadelphia Tribune and the New Pittsburgh Courier finished second and third.

The Philadelphia Tribune, St. Louis American and Houston Forward Times won first, second and third place respectively for Best Special Edition.

The Miami Times, Houston Forward Times and Washington Informer finished first, second, and third in the Best Youth Section category and the Miami Times, Gary Crusader and the Washington Afro-American finished first, second and third in the Best Use of Photographs category.

“We are all winners tonight,” Ashley-Ward said. “When one of us wins, we all win.”

View the recorded livestream of the ceremony below.

 

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Entertainment

Godfather of Funk George Clinton decides to let the music keep playing

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — We know him and love him as the Godfather of Funk. But George Clinton is so much more. After singing doo-wop on street corners in his hometown of Plainfield, New Jersey, as a teenager, Clinton was just a young musician when he opened a barbershop and began to style hair.

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By Rita Charleston

We know him and love him as the Godfather of Funk. But George Clinton is so much more.

After singing doo-wop on street corners in his hometown of Plainfield, New Jersey, as a teenager, Clinton was just a young musician when he opened a barbershop and began to style hair.

“We did the great finger waves of the ‘50s. To be a singer during that era, you had to have your hair done,” Clinton recalls. “And so the barbershop became the R&B star of the neighborhood. It also gave me a place to rehearse my own kind of music.”

And rehearse he did, for when he was not styling hair, Clinton was making music and forming Parliament-Funkadelic — or P-Funk — a collection of rotating musicians made up of two individual bands, Parliament and Funkadelic. Their distinctive funk style drew on psychedelic culture, outlandish fashion, science fiction, and surreal humor.

Influenced by the likes of late 1960s artists such as Jimi Hendrix, Sly Stone and Frank Zappa, Clinton later moved to Detroit and developed a relationship with Motown where he became a songwriter and producer.

“To me, being there was like being with one big, happy family,” says Clinton, who will be appearing June 6 at Franklin Music Hall. “There was Smokey Robinson and Berry Gordy, and production teams like Ashford and Simpson, and so many more. And they all left a lasting impression on me.”

Eventually leaving Motown, Clinton settled in with different record labels for a time. And the P-Funk music ruled Black music during the 1970s thanks to Clinton’s magical managerial style, with 1978-79 being their most successful year.

But the 1980s saw Clinton becoming more and more embroiled in legal matters resulting from a myriad of royalty issues, and eventually deciding to strike out on his own. But his musical roots were never far behind.

The early 1990s saw the rise of funk-inspired rap, thanks to folks like Dr. Dre, and funk rock, thanks to the Red Hot Chili Peppers. All that helped reestablish this music man as one of the most important forces in the recent history of Black music.

But Clinton never had any doubts that he and funk were in it for the long haul.

“I always felt like we were gonna kill with our music. Everybody wants to have fun and that’s what funk is all about,” he says.

And the business has recognized what Clinton is all about many, many times. Over the years he’s received a Grammy, a Dove (gospel), and an MTV music award. He’s also been recognized by BMI, the NAACP Image award, and Motown Alumni Association for Lifetime Achievement. Clinton’s Parliament/Funkadelic was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997.

And although this tour was to be Clinton’s last, he seems to have changed his mind. He says with all the legal problems continuing, he’s decided to keep going for at least another year.

“So as of now I have no immediate plans to retire. Maybe next year I’ll be ready to take it easy. But I still enjoy what I do,” he says.

This article originally appeared in The Philadelphia Tribune

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Food

Philly chefs offer favorite recipes to feast on for National Burger Day

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — Americans eat around 50 billion burgers each year. That equals an average of three burgers a week for everyone in the United States. Imagine if you put all of those burgers in a straight line, it would wrap around the Earth more than 32 times.

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By Jamyra Perry

Americans eat around 50 billion burgers each year. That equals an average of three burgers a week for everyone in the United States. Imagine if you put all of those burgers in a straight line, it would wrap around the Earth more than 32 times.

Although hamburgers originated in Hamburg, Germany, eating a burger on a bun is actually an American tradition. The hamburger as we know is rumored to have been invented in Seymour, Wisconsin. Each year, the city hosts a hamburger festival called Burger Fest.

To celebrate this truly American holiday, we asked some of Philly’s hottest chefs to share their favorite burger recipes.

Bison Burger

Caramelized onion aioli

8-ounce bison patty

Brioche roll

Smoked tomatoes

Gruyere cheese

Crispy onions

Caramelized Onion Aioli

1/4 cup caramelized onions

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 teaspoons lemon juice

1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

Several grinds black pepper

Instructions: Mix ingredients in a large bowl. Taste and adjust seasonings. Refrigerate in covered dish until ready to use.

Inspiration — “The Bison Burger is an ode to America as bison is one of the few animals that is truly native to this land. The leanness provides a much different taste and texture compared to traditional beef. All in all, a true American burger.” —Chef Elijah Milligan

Chef Elijah has spent the last several years cooking or consulting behind many restaurant projects on both the east and west coast, including restaurants such as Petit Green (San Francisco), Stateside (Philadelphia), Angele (Napa), Bottega (Yountville), and Laurel and Vernick (Philadelphia). Elijah’s most recent projects include Cooking for Culture, which is essentially a platform for minority chefs to express their passion for cooking.

Chef Nai’s Ultimate Turkey Burger

3 pounds fresh ground turkey

2 tablespoons of mayo

1 tablespoon siracha

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1 Vidalia onion medium dice

2 cloves minced garlic

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 tablespoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons Belgium beer

1. Mix all ingredients with a spoon folding in gently.

2. Form 2-inch thick patties placing a thumbprint in the center of the burger for even cooking.

3. Place on the grill 8-10 minutes on each side then remove.

4. Top with two slices of muenster cheese and place in the oven on 400 degrees until cheese is bubbling.

Place burger on a fresh brioche bun and enjoy.

Inspiration: “This is the burger that I make at home all of the time. It’s one of my favorite burgers.” —Chef Naimah Rutling

Chef Nai is a chef, caterer and mother of five. She was born and raised in North Philadelphia and learned to cook from her father and uncle. The busy mom/fitness instructor teaches about seven classes a week, in addition to serving as an Ambassador for Wellness with Cooks Who Cares. The organization helps chefs and cooks maintain a healthy lifestyle.

No matter how you choose to celebrate National Burger Day on Tuesday, make sure you enjoy all the delicious ways you can customize your burger — add bacon, ketchup, lettuce, tomatoes, mayo and any other favorite fixings.

This article originally appeared in The Philadelphia Tribune

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