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The San Francisco Black Film Festival Celebrates 17th Year

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The San Francisco Black Film Festival, completing its 17th year, featured nearly 100 films throughout the city last week.

 

The festival showcased the work of dozens of emerging and established filmmakers, including “Beyond the Passage,” “Mac Dre: Legend of the Bay,” “Code Oakland” and “Farm Legacy.”

 

The festival celebrated cinema from a perspective of the Black Diaspora, featuring movies and documentaries based on African, Caribbean and African American experiences.

 

The opening night film, “America Is Still the Place,” featured the life of San Francisco businessman and war veteran Charlie Walker. A panel discussion and reception on June 10 held at the African Plural Art Gallery featured Walker and the film’s director, Patrick Gilles.

 

The film is based on a novel written by Walker, chronicling his struggle to succeed in business in the midst of a racist society.

 

Walker and Gilles discussed their collaboration and the irony of how their filming in the 70’s paralleled 2014 with a natural disaster occurring in the same area 30 years later.

 

They also discussed the disparities plaguing society and how much has remained the same. The outspoken Walker feels that African Americans may have been better off continuing to build their own communities and culture as opposed to working for integration.

 

“We should have bought our own buses and lunch counters,” he said. “Why did we fight so hard to integrate with people who bombed Black churches, killed children and were violent?”

 

Walker, who has five daughters and five grand children with master’s degrees, says that the key to success is a combination of education, common sense and opportunity.

 

“We have too many Blacks with master’s degrees who are homeless and hungry in a land of plenty, and not enough is being done to change it,” he said. “We must be the change.”

 

Walker encourages young people and students to move toward entrepreneurship and become owners of their own businesses.

 

He called on prominent athletes and celebrities in the Bay Area to do their part to help.

 

The San Francisco Black Film festival took place at the Sundance Kabuki Theater, the African American Art & Culture Complex, Second Act and The Variety Premier House. Forums discussed the state of independent films and monetizing films online.

 

“Film brings cultures together,” said Katera Crossley, co-director of the festival. “It’s important for us to have vehicles to prompt conversation on the important issues of our times.”

 

The festival was founded by the late Ave Montague in 1998, mother of co-director Kali O’Ray. Montague sought to present Black filmmaking to the world and generate opportunities in the industry.

 

“Every year we hope to expand my mom’s legacy and benefit artists while entertaining the community,” said O’Ray.

 

For more information, visit sfbff.org

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Arts and Culture

Marin City 80 Celebrations Including History Exhibits, Play Open in August

This interactive, historical, and immersive experience features memorabilia from Black shipyard workers who worked at the Marin shipyard. It explores the Black migration path, and how welding was important in shipbuilding. The exhibit features contemporary original artwork by Chuck D of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame group Public Enemy; clay sculptures by San Francisco-based artist Kaytea Petro; original pieces made by Marin City youth in collaboration with Lynn Sondag of Dominican University of California, and recorded music from Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie.

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Tickets for “Spirit of Joseph James,” are $20.00 and are available @ tickets.marincenter.org. Call the Marin Center Box Office at (415) 473-6800, or go to www.marincity80.com for more information.
Tickets for “Spirit of Joseph James,” are $20.00 and are available @ tickets.marincenter.org. Call the Marin Center Box Office at (415) 473-6800, or go to www.marincity80.com for more information.

By Godfrey Lee

“The Legacy of Marin City, A California Story, from 1942 to 1962” exhibit will be open at the Bartolini Gallery on Aug. 20.

The Gallery, located at the Marin Center at 10 Ave. of the Flags in San Rafael, will be open from Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The free exhibit will be on display until Nov. 1, 2022.

This interactive, historical, and immersive experience features memorabilia from Black shipyard workers who worked at the Marin shipyard. It explores the Black migration path, and how welding was important in shipbuilding.

The exhibit features contemporary original artwork by Chuck D of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame group Public Enemy; clay sculptures by San Francisco-based artist Kaytea Petro; original pieces made by Marin City youth in collaboration with Lynn Sondag of Dominican University of California, and recorded music from Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie.

Original, unpublished photos, and articles from the Felecia Gaston Collection, the Anne T. Kent Collection, and other collections about the Black experience of Marin City will be displayed, along with news clippings from the San Francisco Archives.

“The Legacy of Marin City, A Housing Story” exhibit will be on display on the first and third floors of the Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr., San Rafael, from Aug. 20 to Nov. 1. Hours are Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

This multimedia presentation of newspaper articles and Marin City community artifacts that tells a narrative of housing discrimination, land grab, outside developers, and the continual fight for housing rights and equality in Marin City.

The exhibit will feature works from the Felecia Gaston Collection and the Daniel Ruark Collection and explores how Marin City residents have endured housing inequities over the years, the history of plans to remove Black people from the area during WWII, and the beautiful survival spirit of the people who stayed and made Marin City their home.

The play “Spirit of Joseph James,” will be performed at 2:00 p.m. on Aug. 28 at the Showcase Theater Plaza, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flag, San Rafael. It was produced by Performing Stars of Marin and directed by Jahl of Microphone Mechanics and 393 Films.

Act I, which features Davon Smith of Marin City, begins with Joseph James singing Negro Spirituals for tuition in college, and traveling on tour to the Jim Crow South with Eva Jessye as the prelude to his move to California. The second act, which features Adimu Madyun from Oakland, focuses on the Marinship shipyard in Sausalito and James’ fight against discriminatory union practices with the help of civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall and 1,000 Black shipyard workers. Act III, which features Tami Bell from Marin City, gives in his own words from a video captured in his 70s, a retrospect, and a call to action to continue to work for freedom, justice, and equity.

Tickets for “Spirit of Joseph James,” are $20.00 and are available @ tickets.marincenter.org. Call the Marin Center Box Office at (415) 473-6800, or go to www.marincity80.com for more information.

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Art

Four Seasons Announces Artists for 2022-23 Season

Violinist Angango Yarbo-Davenport, violinist, launches Four Seasons Arts Season on Saturday, October 8, at 3:00, with a program entitled: “Around the World in 70 Minutes.” She will be joined by pianist Elena Cholakova. The program includes works by Florence Price, Juan Antonio Cuellar, Igor Frolov, Jennifer Higdon, and Robert Aldridge.

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The Kanari Saxophone Quartet returns to the Bay Area on Jan. 26, 2023, to deliver a performance that transforms the perception of the saxophone.
The Kanari Saxophone Quartet returns to the Bay Area on Jan. 26, 2023, to deliver a performance that transforms the perception of the saxophone.

By Mary Jo Hudgel

Four Seasons Arts announces its 2022-2023 annual series of music. Programming emphasizes classical music compositions with contemporary works incorporated. The series intentionally offers an inclusive roster of artists that reflects racial, ethnic, and musical diversity.

Violinist Angango Yarbo-Davenport

Violinist Angango Yarbo-Davenport

Violinist Angango Yarbo-Davenport, launches Four Seasons Arts Season on Saturday, October 8, at 3:00, with a program entitled: “Around the World in 70 Minutes.” She will be joined by pianist Elena Cholakova. The program includes works by Florence Price, Juan Antonio Cuellar, Igor Frolov, Jennifer Higdon, and Robert Aldridge.

The Kanari Saxophone Quartet returns to the Bay Area on Jan. 26, 2023, to deliver a performance that transforms the perception of the saxophone. The quartet aims to highlight the instrument’s remarkable versatility by presenting meticulously crafted repertoire from all periods of classical and contemporary music.

Both concerts will be held at: St. John’s Presbyterian Church, 2727 College Ave., in Berkeley.

Four Seasons has scheduled other chamber music events with the Viano String Quartet; the Park Brothers Guitar Duo; Piano Duo Beaux Arts; Thomas Mesa and Ilya Yakushev Piano/Cello Duo; and solo artists Jennifer Ellis, Harp, Amadi Azikiwe, Viola, and Thomas Buckner, a pioneer in performing and commissioning New Music.

A complete listing of Four Seasons Arts concerts can be viewed at www.fsarts.org. Concerts are presented in Berkeley at St. John’s Presbyterian Church and the Berkeley Piano Club.

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Art

Oakland Featured in Film “Bottled Spirits” at Oregon Shakespeare, Premiering Sept. 2 on Live Stream

With an almost all-Black cast and crew, “Bottled Spirits” tells the story of 50-something Louise, a native of West Oakland, a community once known as the Harlem of the West. Gentrification has turned her beloved community into unfriendly and unrecognizable territory, and the weight of being Black in America now threatens to crush her.

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Oakland is featured in a powerful new film, “Bottled Spirits,” premiering at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival on Sept. 2. (Pictured: Cat Brooks and Margo Hall)
Oakland is featured in a powerful new film, “Bottled Spirits,” premiering at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival on Sept. 2. (Pictured: Cat Brooks and Margo Hall)

By Post Staff

Oakland is featured in a powerful new film, “Bottled Spirits,” premiering at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival on Sept. 2.

Three Black artists who live and work in Oakland — actress Margo Hall, writer Cat Brooks, and director Elizabeth Carter — teamed up with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and International Production Company Black Lives Black Words to bring to life this tale of Oakland’s soul.

With an almost all-Black cast and crew, “Bottled Spirits” tells the story of 50-something Louise, a native of West Oakland, a community once known as the Harlem of the West. Gentrification has turned her beloved community into unfriendly and unrecognizable territory, and the weight of being Black in America now threatens to crush her.

She straps on the daily armor of alcohol, cigarettes, and a sharp tongue to block out the constant ache of losing everything that ever mattered. On this day, however, a door she has been banging on for years magically opens, an ancestor arrives to help, and Louise battles her demons — and herself — in a desperate attempt to find the courage to walk the difficult path toward redemption.

The film is the first installment of the Black Lives, Black Words’ Films for the People series.

Said lead actress Margo Hall, “Working on Bottled Spirits allowed me to channel all of the souls of West Oakland. To be inside Esther’s Orbit, and to sit on 7th street where the Panthers marched-ignited something inside of me, that was familiar, frightening, and exalting. I was transported and transformed. Louise is now in me.”

Cat Brooks, writer, said: “This is my love letter to Oakland. I am so grateful to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Black Lives Black Words for this opportunity.  Most importantly, I am grateful to this town for embracing me, sharing its stories and struggles with me and allowing me the privilege of calling Oakland home.”

Director Elizabeth Carter said: “I am beyond thrilled to be directing “Bottled Spirits” for Films for the People. This effort conceived by Black Lives Black Words International Project (Simellia Hodge-Dalloway and Reginald Edmunds) and co-produced with Oregon Shakespeare Festival (Nataki Garrett) is a dream come true.

You can watch a live steam showing of the film, Friday 2, Sept. 2, at 6 p.m. at

https://www.stellartickets.com/…/films-for-the-people. Tickets are $20.

After the screening, VIP ticket-holders (cost $40 for all access) can hear from Cat Brooks and director Elizabeth Carter, and more.Lives, Black Word

For more information: www.osfashland.org/productions/2022-digital/films-for-the-people

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