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Lynch Returning to Seahawks with New Contract

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In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, Seattle Seahawks' Marshawn Lynch stands against a wall during media day for the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game in Newark, N.J. The NFL has fined Marshawn Lynch $50,000 for violations of the league's media policy. League spokesman Michael Signora confirmed the fine Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, which will total $100,000 against the Seahawks' standout. Along with the $50,000 for violating the NFL Media Policy this year, the league is collecting the $50,000 fine that was imposed against Lynch for violations last season.  (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

In this Jan. 28, 2014, file photo, Seattle Seahawks’ Marshawn Lynch stands against a wall during media day for the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

TIM BOOTH, AP Sports Writer

RENTON, Wash. (AP) — “Beast Mode” is getting paid.

Marshawn Lynch is receiving a hefty raise for at least one more season in the Seattle Seahawks backfield.

Lynch signed a two-year extension with the Seahawks on Friday that keeps him under contract with Seattle through the 2017 season, but more importantly includes a massive raise for the 2015 season. Lynch’s restructured deal will pay him $12 million for 2015, according to his agent Doug Hendrickson.

Lynch agreed to his new deal Friday after meeting with Seahawks officials. Hendrickson said the deal includes an additional $24 million for the 2016 and 2017 seasons should Lynch continue his career into his 30s.

He is coming off arguably the best season of his career. He scored a career-high 17 total touchdowns, including 13 rushing. He rushed for 1,306 yards in the regular season and added another 318 yards in three postseason games. Lynch had 102 yards rushing and a touchdown in the Super Bowl.

At the NFL combine last month in Indianapolis, Seattle coach Pete Carroll acknowledged having made a significant offer to Lynch for 2015. Lynch was scheduled to make $7 million for the 2015 season.

“We have been in earnest a great deal of time now negotiating to get Marshawn back with us in every way that we can,” Carroll said at the combine. “It’s been an ongoing, long process and we have had big offers out and we continue to work with that. We are excited about the future.”

The biggest lingering question was whether Lynch would return at age 29 or if he was done playing football. Lynch’s returned was complicated by the decision on Seattle’s final offensive play of the Super Bowl against New England — a pass instead of asking Lynch to try and score from the 1 — and if there was any lingering effect. Russell Wilson’s pass was intercepted by Malcolm Butler and Seattle was denied a second straight title, leaving itself open to second-guessing for why Carroll and offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell chose not to give the ball to Lynch.

During an interview with a television station in Turkey last week — where Lynch was taking part in an American Football Without Borders camp — Lynch said he was expecting to get the ball on Seattle’s final offensive play. He added he didn’t have a problem with the play call.

Aside from the decision in the Super Bowl, it became progressively more difficult through last season to imagine the Seahawks without Lynch in their backfield. Lynch rushed for more than 100 yards five times and was the most consistent piece of the Seahawks’ offense that has won two straight NFC championships.

He has rushed for at least 1,200 yards in each of his four full seasons with the Seahawks, and had at least 11 touchdowns rushing. In 75 regular-season games with Seattle, Lynch has rushed for 5,930 yards and 54 touchdowns.

With Lynch secured for the 2015 season, running back no longer becomes a major need for Seattle. It will eventually need to find an heir to Lynch, but that position would no longer appear to be a priority.

___

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Oakland

Naismith Hall of Fame Basketball Legend Nancy Lieberman WNBA team for Oakland

The former player-coach and Gary Reeves, her development partner, have talked with Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan and members of the African American Sports Entertainment Group since March.

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Nancy Lieberman/ Wikimedia Commons

Nancy Lieberman, one of the most celebrated female basketball players over the last decades, is supporting the push to bring a WNBA (Women’s National Basketball Association) franchise to Oakland.

The former player-coach and Gary Reeves, her development partner, have talked with Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan and members of the African American Sports Entertainment Group since March.

Reeves said, “she (was) one of the most successful WNBA executives. In the early stages of the league’s development with the Detroit Monarchs …. she impressively operated the business side of the team into the ‘black’ and drove a fearless community outreach program. This resulted in the team having one of the largest fan bases in a large, urban-based WNBA city.”
Lieberman has spoken at length to Kaplan about possibly joining a female-led and Black-equity ownership group to bring a team to Oakland. Nancy Lieberman Charities is active today, supporting under-resourced communities across the country with PPE, food distribution, academic scholarships, job readiness programs and providing clothes to 100 new Nancy Lieberman Sport Courts for neighborhoods that don’t have up-to-date, safe playing surfaces.
Lieberman told Post Publisher Paul Cobb that she often credits the African American community for protecting her and supporting her as a child, especially when she played hoops at the legendary Rucker Park in New York City. 

Kaplan cited the June 2021 cover story of the Sports Illustrated magazine as evidence of the emergence and growth of the WNBA and its potential opportunities for diversity and equity and female and Black ownership potential.

Since Lieberman’s first interview and podcast with the Post, many Oakland-based groups have expressed interest in bringing a WNBA team to Oakland. 

Reeves said the initiatives taken by Lieberman and Kaplan should be supported and embraced by the Black community. 

Gay Plair Cobb, CEO Emerita of the PIC (Partners In Careers), said “It’s past time for Black women to also participate as co-owners with a diverse group of women investors in major sports franchises.”

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Community

Turner Family Patriarch Turns 100, Passes the Torch

A huge fan of the L.A. Dodgers, Turner was invited to try out for the Dodgers Minor System in the early 1950s and the ambidextrous Turner once pitched a double header left-handed in the first game and right-handed in the second.

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Caption: Douglas “Buster” Turner looks out over Oakland and the San Francisco Bay from his back porch on May 28, 2021, just six days after his 100th birthday. Photo by Christy Price.

A poem written for Douglas “Buster” Turner’s 100th birthday is entitled “My Eyes Have Seen a Lot of Things.” After 100 years on Earth, that is an understatement. Turner’s life began on May 22, 1921, in Ansley, La., as the son of Nada and John Turner. 

Turner had a full childhood surrounded by his 13 siblings in Morton, Miss., where they were raised. Turner’s parents instilled in their children a sense of honor and pride by teaching them to be accountable and take responsibility for their actions while still giving them the autonomy they needed to become their own people. 

And become his own person, he did!

A young Turner served in the United States Army, completing a tour of duty in Nazi Germany during World War II. After an honorable discharge from the military, Turner utilized the benefits being a veteran offered him through the GI Bill. 

Turner married Coreene in 1940 and they took up a nomadic lifestyle in the Deep South during the Jim Crow era. They adjusted and adapted as they traveled along what his son, Eddie Turner, refers to as the ‘Chitlin Circuit,’ barnstorming with various Negro League Baseball teams through Mississippi, Texas, Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Georgia. Turner moved to Oakland in 1949 with the rest of the family joining him about a year later. 

A huge fan of the L.A. Dodgers, Turner was invited to try out for the Dodgers Minor System in the early 1950s and the ambidextrous Turner once pitched a double header left-handed in the first game and right-handed in the second.

The time spent on the road with Coreene, who passed away in 2015, created a bond that lasted 75 years and produced seven children. The Turners would raise Albertine, Eddie, Fred, Johnny, Michael, Mary, and Sherrie with the same family values that Turner had been raised with. 

Their door was always open to the neighborhood children and the family never met a stranger. Douglas Turner’s legacy is an open, helping hand, one of caring and sharing. 

To provide for his family, both close and extended, Turner became a union journeyman machinist. Turner employed many workers at his Mohawk Gas Station in Oakland, Calif. before the brand changed hands. When his budget kept him from buying a much needed truck, Turner’s innovation and imagination led him to repurpose a car into a truck, well before the El Camino made its debut. 

As Mr. Turner turns 100 years old and dementia confuses time and memories for him; he often revisits the past. His son becomes his brother, and he is once again a young man. 

Though the memories are fading for him, the stories of his epic journeys will not end: Turner’s children will carry on the Turner legacy of accountability, responsibility, integrity, and autonomy. The Turner family is the product of all the hard work that Turner did in making a strong family unit filled with the wonderful tales they saw through their father’s eyes. 

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Bay Area

Vice Mayor: Business Group Wants to Buy Coliseum, Attract WNBA Team

The group will provide additional details of its effort at a news conference at 11:00 a.m. Friday at a site to be determined.

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Oakland Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan.

Oakland Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan said a local business group has made serious inroads to buy the city’s 50% stake in the Oakland Coliseum complex and to bring a WNBA team to the city.
Kaplan’s office shared a news release Monday about the effort by the African American Sports and Entertainment Group.

Kaplan said the group is in negotiations with the Oakland-Alameda Joint Powers Authority, has submitted a formal proposal to WNBA officials, and has submitted a term sheet to the city, which the City Council’s rules committee recently voted to advance to the full council for a vote.

The group will provide additional details of its effort at a news conference at 11:00 a.m. Friday at a site to be determined.

“I am pleased that there is such great interest in doing an important development at the Oakland Coliseum that will provide jobs, revenue and community positivity,” Kaplan said. “My goal is to help this process move forward before the summer recess.”

Kaplan said the group has the backing of more than 30 community groups of faith-based institutions, labor organizations, civic leaders, and job development organizations. She did not name the groups

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