Connect with us

Art

Knoxville’s Race Riot…100 Years Later

THE TENNESSEE TRIBUNE — In 1919 an innocent white woman was killed in Knoxville Tennessee. Despite the lack of evidence against him, a black man, Maurice Mays would be accused of the crime.

Published

on

By Vivian Shipe

KNOXVILLE, TN — In 1919 an innocent white woman was killed in Knoxville Tennessee. Despite the lack of evidence against him, a black man, Maurice Mays would be accused of the crime. In the ensuring days following the charge, Affluent African American businesses would be burnt down by angry white mobs on Gay Street and other parts of town, homes would be burnt, and countless numbers would die. Mays would be moved to Chattanooga, tried and electrocuted in Nashville, and would go to his grave confessing his innocence. The story is true as Knoxville was one of the cities around America that would experience race riots in the hot summer of 1919. One Knoxville author would gather the research and lay the story down in written word to last forever.

Bob Booker’s book, “The Heat of a Red Summer: Race Mixing , Race Rioting in 1919 Knoxville” was brought to life at the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville in the very venue that Booker was not allowed in sit in freely until he was 27 years old. Until then, all African Americans had to sit in the colored section in the balcony. Not so on this eventful evening.

With a crowd so large the fire marshal had to turn people away; the culminating event of Knoxville’s Black History Celebration drew a diverse crowd to watch the book brought to life. Presented by the Beck Cultural Exchange Center, The Bijou Theatre, and others, The book came to life under the thunderous and captivating voice of narrator Dr. Maxine Thompson Davis.

The story was told thru dance performances by Austin-East Magnet High School Performing Arts under the direction of Ms. Malaika Guthrie with songs performed by the Knoxville Opera Gospel Choir. Thru the visual dance and soul stirring songs , the story of the riot, capture of Mays, his letters of innocence pleas from jail; an execution of a man , many considered innocent, was boldly carried out.

One of the most riveting performances of the evening was the presentation of a skit called THE CURE, in which Morristown West High School performers, Chris Cox and Dalton Miksa presented a skit from the future where they looked at how to cure hatred as they looked over the past of America and the experiment ending with the cure of love being the answer.

The program ended with words from the author Bob Booker, who also stayed to sign copies

of the book which has been re released in anticipation of the many events planned to commemorate the 100 years. One ongoing event announced by Director of the Beck Center , Reverend Renee Kesler, is a letter writing campaign to have Maurice Mays name exonerated. The email site to join in the call to clear his name is: MauriceMays@BeckCenter.net.

The Carpetbag Theatre, which is celebrating its 50th year will present a SWOPERA (Spoken word Opera) about the riots at the Bijou from Sept 19-22nd and there are also panel discussions planned in the coming months about the riots and the questions left behind …

Where are we 100 years later? and Could it happen again?

This article originally appeared in The Tennessee Tribune

Art

Maestro Michael Morgan Conducts San Francisco Symphony

Morgan was born and raised in Wash., D.C., and is recognized worldwide for innovative and thematically rich programs that make connections between a wide range of artists and musical cultures.

Published

on

Maestro Michael Morgan

Maestro Michael Morgan, music director and conductor of the Oakland Symphony, will conduct the San Francisco Symphony at Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco, CA, Friday, July 23, 2021 at 7:00 p.m.

The program will include the overture to Gioachino Rossini’s opera “La gazza ladra,” along with a playful Pas de Six from “William Tell.” Louise Farrenc’s revelatory Symphony No. 3 from 1847 takes center stage, while the program concludes with James P. Johnson’s Roaring 20s hit, “Charleston.”

“I am thrilled to be helping the San Francisco Symphony share all the wonderful things they do with a wider and more diverse audience’, said Morgan.

Morgan’s ties to the San Francisco Symphony stretch back to 1994, when he first led Concerts for Kids performances.

Morgan was born and raised in Wash., D.C., and is recognized worldwide for innovative and thematically rich programs that make connections between a wide range of artists and musical cultures.

Continue Reading

Art

BIPOC Writers to Showcase Live Readings of New Anthology ‘Essential Truths’

The free, virtual event will begin with an invocation by Berkeley Poet Laureate Rafael Jesús González and will feature 18 BIPOC writers and poets in lively readings and presentations.

Published

on

Essential Truths the Bay Area In Color/WriteNow! SF

Oakland Asian Cultural Center in partnership with Write Now! SF Bay will host an East Bay Showcase of its latest anthology “Essential Truths on Thursday, July 22. 

The free, virtual event will begin with an invocation by Berkeley Poet Laureate Rafael Jesús González and will feature 18 BIPOC writers and poets in lively readings and presentations.

Among those performing and reading are: Avotcja, Clara Hsu, Danny Ryu, Darzelle Oliveros, Dianne Leo-Omine, Elmaz Abinader, Kelechi Ubozoh, Karen Seneferu, Kimi Sugioka, Sandra Bass, Shirley Huey, Shizue Seigal, Sridevi Ramanathan, Susana Praver-Pérez, Tiny (aka Lisa Gray-Garcia), Tony Aldorondo, Tureeda Mikell, and Wanda Sabir. 

To register for this event, which begins at 7:00 p.m., visit https://oacc.cc/event/essential-truths-east-bay/. A complete list of Oakland Asian Cultural Center readers’ affiliations can be found here: OACC READERS

Write Now! SF Bay, an organization that has helped 350 writers and artists create with their free and low-cost programs and provided a safe community where BIPOC feel free to express themselves, has published its fourth anthology.

“Essential Truths, The Bay Area in Color,” is its fourth anthology. The collection of 130 Bay Area BIPOC’s poems, musings, and art was edited by Siegal, the founder/director of Write Now! SF Bay.

“Our work is not always polished, but it arises from the lived experience of grappling with real issues of the day,” Siegal said. “We may write in the vernacular or English may be our second or third language. 

“If our rhythms are unfamiliar, ask yourself why—is our work inflected by other tongues and vernaculars, rusty from disuse, scattered by stress or trauma, struggling out silence, or hastily scribbled on borrowed time? 

“Old ways are dissolving, and change is in the air. BIPOC arts and activism have been here all along. Now we are stepping into the light,” Siegal said.

The contributors are Black, Brown, Indigenous, People of Color, and LGBTQ communities along with a few white allies who run the gamut from poet laureates to high school students to college professors and beyond. 

Since 2015, Write Now! SF Bay has been led by and for BIPOC Bay Area writers and builds multicultural solidarity around their unique identities as people of color and reclaim their culture and history, personal and community well-being as well as civil liberties and social justice.

“Essential Truths, The Bay Area in Color” is published is available for purchase at $17.95 by visiting https://www.writenowsf.com/essential-truths

Continue Reading

Activism

Haitian American Artist Brings His Vision, Gift to State’s COVID Campaign

The artworks, created by the Grammy-nominated visual artist Serge Gay Jr, were commissioned to encourage people to continue to take safety precautions against COVID-19 even though the state reopened last month, according to the governor’s office.  

Published

on

Serge Gay Jr. at Art Attack mimicking a playboy bunny in one of his paintings. Photo by James Chiang.

California’s “Your Actions Save Lives” art campaign recently unveiled two “Safety First” murals in San Francisco. The artworks, created by the Grammy-nominated visual artist Serge Gay Jr, were commissioned to encourage people to continue to take safety precautions against COVID-19 even though the state reopened last month, according to the governor’s office.
One is located in the Castro and the other in the Tenderloin, — two well-known districts steeped in the Golden Gate City’s famous history of Leftist political organizing and the visibility of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ+) people.
The Tenderloin mural, which he dedicates to the city’s transgender community, was inspired by the idea of, “breaking free because during the pandemic, we were all just home and kind of stuck there,” said Gay.  His second artwork is located at 2390 Market St. in the Castro.
The state says the “Your Actions Save Lives” campaign equips Californians with information about what they can do to help stem the spread of COVID-19.  To get the word out, it partnered with The Center at the Sierra Health Foundation and 20 local artists across the state to reach communities that have been hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic.
According to Gay, he celebrates the Tenderloin for its inclusion of Black and Brown people. The message behind the mural places an emphasis on freedom of movement following the COVID-19 pandemic and encourages the public to get vaccinated, says the artist whose collaboration with film director Matt Stawski clinched him a Grammy nomination for “Best Short Form Video.”
“I wanted to really kind of also showcase our trends visibility,” said Gay.
Gay pays homage to his Haitian roots through his artwork which celebrates various Black communities in the Bay Area — African Americans as well as African and Caribbean immigrants, he explains.

Continue Reading

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending