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Faye Carol Holds ‘Dynamic’ Black History Month Concerts Sundays at Geoffrey’s Inner Circle

The Dynamic Miss Faye Carol is known as an icon in the Bay Area and beyond, highly regarded for her powerful voice, astonishing versatility, and gift of connecting with her audience.

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The Dynamic Miss Faye Carol has been performing in the Bay Area for mor than 40 years. Photo by Gene Hazzard.
The Dynamic Miss Faye Carol has been performing in the Bay Area for mor than 40 years. Photo by Gene Hazzard.

The Dynamic Miss Faye Carol, in collaboration with world-renowned guest artists, is hosting a four-week concert series, “Faye and The Folks,” celebrating Black History Month every Sunday in February at Geoffrey’s Inner Circle.

The first two Sundays featured saxophonist Rickey Woodard of the Ray Charles Band and vocalist Kenny Washington.

This Sunday, Feb. 20, the renowned Bay Area vocalist will perform with her all-star sextet, presenting an evening across the musical spectrum from jazz to blues to funk and beyond beginning at 6 p.m.

Featured in the ensemble will be some of the greatest musicians of our time – drummer Dennis Chambers, Berkeley-reared flautist Elena Pinderhughes, trumpeter Bill Ortiz, trombonist Steve Turre, bassist Essiet Essiet, and pianist Joe Warner.

These incredible artists have shared the stage with Herbie Hancock, Santana, Parliament/Funkadelic, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, McCoy Tyner, Dizzy Gillespie, George Duke, and many more.

The series will close out on Feb. 27 at 6 p.m. as Faye Carol teams up with world-renowned pedal steel guitar virtuoso Robert Randolph for a stripped down and intimate night of roots music from the church to the blues and more.

Presented in solo and duo pairings, this will be an historic night of roots music through the generations.

The Dynamic Miss Faye Carol is known as an icon in the Bay Area and beyond, highly regarded for her powerful voice, astonishing versatility, and gift of connecting with her audience.

Equally at home in jazz, blues, R&B, gospel, funk, Latin, and hip-hop, she has developed her own authentic sound and unique delivery, delighting audiences young and old across the globe.

Miss Carol has shared the stage with artists such as Marvin Gaye, Joan Baez, James Brown, Otis Redding, Buster Williams, Bernard Purdie, Pharoah Sanders, Albert King, Lenny White, Charles Brown, and Bobby Hutcherson.

Join this Bay Area legend in celebrating Black History Month with what are sure to be amazing and unique collaborations with celebrated international artists and the best Oakland has to offer. Tickets are $40 and are available at the door or at fayeandthefolks.eventbrite.com

Geoffrey’s is located at 410 14th St. in downtown Oakland and offers a full bar and $15 soul food plates.

This project is supported by City of Oakland and California Arts Council.

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Arts and Culture

Marin City Juneteenth Festival Celebrates Unity in the Community

Marin City celebrated the Eighth Annual Juneteenth Festival on Saturday, June 22, at the Rocky Graham Park. This year’s theme was Umoja, which means Unity in our community. This year, the festival organizers distributed a program flyer that acknowledged and appreciated the 40+ hardworking vendors who brought “art, treasures, service, and culinary delights to our International African Marketplace” and the friends and supporters of the Juneteenth Festival.

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From top left: Ain Ashby and Mariah Ashby at the Happy Juneteenth booth, Cynthia Williams at the Center for Domestic Peace booth, Sarah Turner, Anne Deverb, and Nancy Miller at the Come to The Table booth, Tony Swan and June Farmer at the Marin County Flood Control booth, Desirae Rogeb, Yero Massamba, and Ngona Badila at the O Greena-Ancient Remedies booth, People dancing, ChaintiAna Thomas, The Juneteenth Festival stage. Photos by Godfrey Lee.
From top left: Ain Ashby and Mariah Ashby at the Happy Juneteenth booth, Cynthia Williams at the Center for Domestic Peace booth, Sarah Turner, Anne Deverb, and Nancy Miller at the Come to The Table booth, Tony Swan and June Farmer at the Marin County Flood Control booth, Desirae Rogeb, Yero Massamba, and Ngona Badila at the O Greena-Ancient Remedies booth, People dancing, ChaintiAna Thomas, The Juneteenth Festival stage. Photos by Godfrey Lee.

By Godfrey Lee

Marin City celebrated the Eighth Annual Juneteenth Festival on Saturday, June 22, at the Rocky Graham Park. This year’s theme was Umoja, which means Unity in our community.

This year, the festival organizers distributed a program flyer that acknowledged and appreciated the 40+ hardworking vendors who brought “art, treasures, service, and culinary delights to our International African Marketplace” and the friends and supporters of the Juneteenth Festival.

The back of the flyer says that the program “only accepts sponsorship from organizations, municipalities and individuals aligned with our values of peace, liberation, justice, and healing of the mind, body and spirit.”

Here are the many vendors listed in the program by category:

  • Art, Craft, Clothing

Alecia’s Sweets & Gifts, Atrenia’s Treasures, Magi’s Treasures, Tiffany’s Trendy Treasures, Senegalese Art & Waist Beads Fittings, Superior Boutique, Black Anime Art, Eunice’s Unique Creations, Wise Choices, Belle Noire Accessories, Kimani’s Gifts from Kenya, T-Shirts by Jade, Ms. Cynthia’s Ice Box Magnets, Art/Designed Fashion by Malaak and Ain’s Sweets & T-Shirts, Lumpen Proletariat Digital Gallery, MC Arts Gallery,

  • Food, Snacks, Deserts

Nestor’s Jive Turkey Legs, “Dis Nice’ Jamaican Food, “Delightful Foods” Pies/Cookies/Fresh Juices, Akoma Cameroonian Coffee & Gifts, Abhimanyu’s Vegetarian for Life, Clark’s Lemonade, Eats & Treats by Hope Housing, Ms. Clotile’s Fried Fish & Fries, Bryant Family Gumbo, Bakery and Juices, Ms. Eboni’s Sugar Shack, Roadside Soul BBQ, The Red Truck, Lily’s Burgers, Links & Sides, Mr. Leshawn’s Shrimp and Grits,

  • Wellness and Activities

Play Marin, FMBC Mental Health Advocates, Prayer Booth with Steve and Alesia, “Spyfro Man,” French Tutoring by Jean Pierre, Orianna’s Books, O’Green Natural Cleaning, Face Painting by Ayanna, Marin City Wellness Clinic/First Aid Booth, Marin Health Team’s Smoothie Bike, Performance Art by Olubori, Deep Healing Massage by Gio, and Horse Rides with Jaymo.

  • Community Advocates

Marin City CSD, DWP Flood Project Marin City, Marin City Climate Justice, Center for Domestic Peace, Friends of Golden Gate Village, Marin City Library, Marin City Climate Justice, County of Marin, the Marin Community Foundation, the City of Sausalito, the Marin City Community Services District, MC Art and Culture, Showing Up for Racial Justice, and MCE – Empowering Our Clean Energy Future.

The good Business Neighbors were the Good Earth Natural Foods in Mill Valley, the Marin City Community Development Corporation (MCCDC), Marin City Cornerstone Church, and the First Missionary Baptist Church.

And finally, the program acknowledged the generous friends of the festival: Ricardo Moncrief, Doreen Gounard, Malachia Hoover, Darryl Bozeman, Federico Cortez (owner of “Paws Palace” at the Gateway Mall), Maria Banas, Joan Smith, Kalicia Pivirotto, Jessica Lundy, and the SURJ Marin Volunteers.

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Arts and Culture

West Oakland Juneteenth Event Cultivated Love for All

Since 2008, Barbara Howard of B-H Brilliant Minds’ has prided herself on holding the last Juneteenth event in Oakland. And since, unlike most other Bay Area cities, Oakland has not hosted a free observation of the holiday celebrating the end of chattel slavery in the U.S., Howard’s is also the only formally organized Juneteenth event in the city.

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Oakland Black Cowboys Association President Wilbert McAlister leads a girl on a pony ride at the B-H Brilliant Minds Juneteenth. Photo by Daisha Williams.
Oakland Black Cowboys Association President Wilbert McAlister leads a girl on a pony ride at the B-H Brilliant Minds Juneteenth. Photo by Daisha Williams.

By Daisha Williams

Since 2008, Barbara Howard of B-H Brilliant Minds’ has prided herself on holding the last Juneteenth event in Oakland.

And since, unlike most other Bay Area cities, Oakland has not hosted a free observation of the holiday celebrating the end of chattel slavery in the U.S., Howard’s is also the only formally organized Juneteenth event in the city.

From the beginning, Howard brought in grass roots entertainment that was by and for the West Oakland community. Subtitled “Reaching for Wholeness, One Love & One Liberation, the festival was held Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Running from 32nd and Market to San Pablo and Brockhurst, there were stages on both sides of the block, as well as more activities in a courtyard and inside the West Oakland Youth Center.

The day started with a libation for the ancestors by Clint Sockwell, and the ring shout, a homage to the ancestors provided by Omnira Institute’s Awon Ohun Omnira (Voices of Freedom.)

Also on stages all day were R&B, rap, gospel performances, live DJs.

The festival was lively and active, with people constantly milling about, chatting with each other, taking part in activities, dancing, and eating. Events like these are what keeps Oakland a place of community.

With so many different activities– there was really something for everyone. Present were the Made-Men Bay Area Motorcycle Club, a martial arts demonstration, and a quilting exhibit.

There were many vendors selling clothes, jewelry, bags, and even hand dipped incense and candles as well as local organizations such as Building Opportunities for Self Sufficiency (BOSS) and Community Ready Corps (CRC).

There were crafts and free posters being made and the Oakland Public Library giving out books, performances, and music on the stages– there was every opportunity to have a fun and fulfilling time without spending a single dollar.

The Oakland Black Cowboy Association was there giving free, guided horse and pony rides to anyone who wanted one. Their 50-year anniversary is this year, and they are hosting a parade and festival in celebration on Oct. 5 at DeFremery Park.

The Black cowboys go to many events like these providing opportunities to ride a horse to children and adults alike who might not have this opportunity otherwise.

Wilbert F. McAlister, who has been president of the organization for 20 years, was there and you could see the joy on his face as he watched people have this wonderful experience.

B-H Brilliant Minds is a local 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization that serves the Oakland community. Founded by Barbara Howard, they put on this Juneteenth every year. At the event Howard talked about why she puts this event on.

She called all the youth to the stage and told them that this event is put on for them, that they are strong, beautiful, and capable, that they are the future of Black excellence. This event is intended to show them how loved and supported they are in this community, in hopes that they will pass that love down to the next generation.

B-H Brilliant Minds does more than just Juneteenth. They lead three programs: economic empowerment, holistic wellness, and one called The Cutting Edge. The Cutting Edge focuses on self-improvement, leadership skills, and other types of personal growth. Each program consists of at least three workshops and registration is available on their website (bhbrilliantminds.org ).

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Arts and Culture

Hundreds of Revelers Cheer Parade, Join Fun at Juneteenth Festival in Nicholl Park

A bright sun greeted one of Richmond’s most important community gatherings on June 22: the annual Juneteenth Parade and Festival. Hundreds of people greeted the lengthy parade that began at Kennedy High School, passed under the recently-created Juneteenth Freedom Underpass Mural on 37th Street, and continued on to Nicholl Park, where a colorful festival took place through the afternoon.

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A marching band followed the parade route from Kennedy High School to Nicholl Park. Photos by Mike Aldax and Mike Kinney.
A marching band followed the parade route from Kennedy High School to Nicholl Park. Photos by Mike Aldax and Mike Kinney.

By Mike Aldax, Mike Kinney and
Kathy Chouteau
The Richmond Standard

A bright sun greeted one of Richmond’s most important community gatherings on June 22: the annual Juneteenth Parade and Festival.

Hundreds of people greeted the lengthy parade that began at Kennedy High School, passed under the recently-created Juneteenth Freedom Underpass Mural on 37th Street, and continued on to Nicholl Park, where a colorful festival took place through the afternoon.

Michelle Milam, crime prevention manager for the City of Richmond and an organizer, said the parade boasted 70 entries and the festival had 117 booths staffed with community organizations, businesses, and resources. Soul food was being served by a number of popular local eateries such as CJ’s BBQ & Fish, Snapper Seafood and Cousins Maine Lobster.

The annual event is supported via a partnership between the N.B.A., City of Richmond and Chevron.

The Standard asked dozens of community members at this event what Juneteenth means to them.

“It is a celebration of freedom,” said AJ Jelani, president of the Belding Woods Neighborhood Council.

Jelani founded the nonprofit organization A.J./Sealcraft, which honors African American individuals, organizations, groups, and businesses who contributed to empowering fellow African Americans to improve their communities.

“Juneteenth is a recognition of our culture, our history,” he said. “Our unique past was a functionality of the community. It brought us together.”

Richmond resident Gloria Wilson added, “Juneteenth is a day to remember our ancestors’ struggles for our freedom.”

Contra Costa County Supervisor John Gioia told us the celebration is “about our community coming together.”

“It’s about recognizing the struggles that it has taken up until now, and that there is still work ahead to achieve true equity and equality,” Gioia said.

Gioia noted Richmond is unique for having had an annual Juneteenth parade and festival years before Juneteenth was recognized as a federal holiday in 2021.

“Richmond has had a great history of winning struggles,” Gioia said. “It is important for us to continue that work.”

“We all have the responsibility to uplift and celebrate how people persevered and continue to persevere in the face of challenge.”

Gioia said that is why the County has an Office of Racial Equity and Social Justice.

“I was just talking to the school board and superintendent about the work we’re doing, and the superintendent was talking about their equity plan for the school district, so it all comes together,” Gioia said. “Agencies working together.”

Richmond City Councilmember Doria Robinson, who helped carry the City Council banner in the parade alongside some of her Council colleagues, said Juneteenth is a celebration of perseverance.

“It’s the day where everyone…can reflect on what happened with slavery and can realize that we all carry that burden,” Robinson said, “and that we all have the responsibility to uplift and celebrate how people persevered, and continue to persevere in the face of challenge.”

Added Councilmember Cesar Zepeda, “Richmond has been at the forefront of making sure that our community is aware of Juneteenth. And just more recently, people are finding out about Juneteenth and celebrating it in their cities. Once again Richmond is at the forefront.”

Fast on the heels of Juneteenth, Richmond will get a jump on Independence Day by celebrating along the waterfront Wednesday, July 3.

The City of Richmond will celebrate the “3rd of July Fireworks & Celebration” July 3 from 5-10 p.m. at Marina Bay Park. The fireworks will start at 9:15 p.m., with the show lasting approximately 20 minutes. Along with the fireworks, festivities will include live music, a selection of food choices and an interactive Fun Zone for the kids. Marina Bay Park is located at Marina Bay & Regatta Blvd. in Richmond.

Also on Wednesday, July 3, “Fireworks at the Point at Riggers Loft Wine Company” will take place from 6-10 p.m. Andre Thierry, a.k.a. “the Zydeco king,” will entertain the crowd while they enjoy a choice of cuisine from five food tents prepared by Chef Frank Miller.

Games, wine, cider, and sodas will also be part of the mix. At 9:15 p.m., the venue—and its bayside patio—are perfectly poised to take in the City of Richmond’s fireworks show, for which beach chairs and blankets are suggested.

Tickets are $35 for adults, $15 for those under 21 and free for kids 5 and under. Purchase tickets here and find Riggers Loft at 1325 Canal Blvd. in Richmond.

For those heading to San Francisco on the Fourth of July, the city’s fireworks are set off via two locations in front of Fisherman’s Wharf: The end of Municipal Pier and barges in front of Pier 39. Transit options from Richmond to San Francisco include the San Francisco Bay Ferry, which will operate on a weekend schedule from Thursday, July 4, through Sunday, July 7—learn more https://sanfranciscobayferry.com/holiday-ferry-schedule

BART will run a Sunday schedule (8 a.m. until midnight) on Independence Day— go to https://www.bart.gov/guide/holidaysfor more information. And visit AC Transit for info on catching a bus.

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