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Charles Patton Calls for 20 Million New Voters in 2020

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Entrepreneur, coach, and real estate investor Charles Patton has recently added voting rights advocate to his title after a visit to the office of Oakland Post publisher Paul Cobb, where creativity and “aha!” moments are generated quite often.

As the two conversed Patton noticed large black and white photos of Cobb and three other Oakland residents beside Dr. Martin Luther King jr. on the wall.

Patton, amazed by the images asked Cobb to share his experience.

“During an atmosphere of violent and aggressive police opposition, many civil rights workers had written wills and waivers against legal actions if they were killed while participating in civil rights activities,” said Cobb.

“Due to the national response to the many arrests and some deaths over the Southern states, Congress and President Johnson passed the Voting Rights Act.”

As Cobb began to explain the magnitude of just how many everyday people and advocates who were led in particular by ministers responding to Dr. King’s call to action, Patton began to see the value again of galvanizing the masses and duplicating the movement around voter registration and other important issues.

Now 50+ years later, some legislation and court rulings are turning back the gains of the 1965 bill. Cobb and the Post News Group (PNG) are continuing the mission to maintain voter rights. PNG will feature weekly articles about registration and the census in their newspapers.

Patton has now formed a bipartisan organization called Make A Difference And Vote, a grassroots movement with the theme “20 for 2020”. In partnership with the Post, Jonathan “Fitness” Jones creator of breathing aerobics, and others across the nation, Patton expects to spark the registration of 20 million new voters by November 2020, using cell phones to register people in minutes.

“Through the use of a cell phone, anyone can be an activist and as we work together there’s no reason PNGs readers, the family of churches, unions, entertainers, athletes, Greek-letter organizations, businesses and other media outlets can’t produce change in our society,” said Patton.

“I want everyone to register to vote on Patton’s new platform in a four-step process and encourage others to do the same,” said Cobb. “Register at www.makeadifferenceandvote.com, upload a (photo) selfie when you vote at the polls or mail your ballot, and ask 20 others to do the same.”

Patton is so passionate about his new movement that he has even written a song titled Make A Difference And Vote that will feature music video featuring  next spring in 2020 involving 50 high profile multicultural and political supporters. It is being hailed as the “We Are the World” for voting.

Patton says his family, mentor Danny Glover, and leading empowerment workshops across the country has kept him motivated.

“Change is imminent, and with everyone’s voice heard and every vote counted, America will be better than it is today, “ said Patton.

 

Ladies in Red —which was founded in Oakland by Brenda Knight — journeyed with 120 of its 1,400 membership to visit the Alabama Civil Rights Tour to Selma, Montgomery and Birmingham Alabama. With the recommendation of Rev. Dr. J. Alfred Smith, Sr., Ladies In Red worshiped with The Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church. The current Pastor is Rev. Cromwell A. Handy. Although Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. preached at many churches, Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church was the only church for which he was the Pastor. Ladies In Red donated $2,400.00 to the church.
     The Ladies in Red also followed the same trail of the 1965 marchers across the Edmund Pettus
Bridge on their journey to Montgomery. Then they visited the church in Birmingham where in 1963 four girls were killed in a bombing during worship services. Upon their return to the Bay Area, with renewed vigor and commitment, Knight announced that her members were committed to registering at least 20 voters each. The Ladies in Red are now actively working with the Post, Charles Patton and other groups to honor the commitment and sacrifices of John Lewis, Rosa Parks, Ralph Abernathy, C.T. Vivian, Medgar Evers, Julian Bond and many more. Photo courtesy of Brenda Knight.

Activism

Juneteenth Father’s Day for the Formerly Incarcerated

The giveaway was a testament of the Formerly Incarcerated Giving Back to the community in the best way they could. Participants received an array of gifts including clothing, work pants, jeans, socks, toiletries and gift cards. The event gave them a place to identify with other men who have overcome many hardships and now live independently of the direct supervision of the criminal justice system.

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From left to right: Dora Parlor, Richard Johnson and Ayanna Weathers. Photo by Jonathan ‘fitness’ Jones.
From left to right: Dora Parlor, Richard Johnson and Ayanna Weathers. Photo by Jonathan ‘fitness’ Jones.

By Richard Johnson

The founders of The Formerly Incarcerated Giving Back organization sponsored a Father’s Day celebration event that highlighted a “just serve spirit” which recognized dads who want to “give and serve” their families and communities, that reached over 150 men in deep East Oakland. Fathers from all walks of life, languages and nationalities were in attendance.

The giveaway was a testament of the Formerly Incarcerated Giving Back to the community in the best way they could. Participants received an array of gifts including clothing, work pants, jeans, socks, toiletries and gift cards. The event gave them a place to identify with other men who have overcome many hardships and now live independently of the direct supervision of the criminal justice system.

The celebration was co-sponsored by several organizations, including the African American Sports and Entertainment Group, (AASEG) headed by Ray Bobbitt, B.O.S.S. Reentry program, and the Reentry, The Post News Group and Violence Prevention programs directed by John Jones III.

The participating fathers were offered counseling and services to cover back rent, rental deposit, utility bills, credit repair and much more.

As fate would have it, one of the Founders of Formerly Incarcerated Giving Back, Mr. Paul Redd, was called home by the Lord. His passing came on Father’s Day. We could never question God’s work when He calls His flock home. Paul will be greatly missed by many who loved, appreciated and respected him greatly. We, the Formerly Incarcerated Giving Back, gave back in our experience our profound condolences to the family. We will certainly continue the work that he helped to establish. Rest in Peace my brother.

To utilize the services of BOSS (Building Opportunities for Self-Sufficiency), please contact John Jones at 510-459-9014. For more information on this activity and future activities, please contact Richard Johnson at fatijohns28@gmail.com.

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Bay Area

Willie O’Ree, 1st Black Player in NHL, is a Real Ice Man

In 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden signed the Willie O’Ree Congressional Gold Medal Act. The bill awarded O’Ree a Congressional Gold Medal, the U.S. Congress’ highest honor, for his contributions to “hockey, inclusion and recreational opportunity.”

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Willie O’Ree on the ice in mid-career.
Willie O’Ree on the ice in mid-career.

By Tamara Shiloh

Historically, professional hockey has held fast to its tradition of lacking diversity among its players. But no Black on the ice did not hold Willie O’Ree back. He started playing hockey at age 3 and instantly had a passion for the game.

Born on October 15, 1935, in Frederickton, New Brunswick, Canada, O’Ree at the age of 14 years old, played with his brother Richard in organized hockey. Within a year, he was playing with the Frederickton Falcons in New Brunswick Amateur Hockey team.

O’Ree played in Canada with the Quebec Frontenacts in the 1954-55 Junior League and the Kitchener Canucks of Ontario during the 1955-56 season. It was during this season that he lost 95% of his vision in his right eye after being hit by a puck. He also suffered a broken nose and cheekbone. Knowing that the NHL bylaws would prevent him from playing with the eye injury, he kept it a secret.

After one year in Ontario, O’Ree returned to play in Québec and was eighth in team scoring with the Quebec Aces in the 1956–57 season with 22 goals and 12 assists for 34 points. He would play two more seasons with the Aces in 1957–58 and 1958–59.

As a result of the relationship between the Boston Bruins and the Quebec Aces, O’Ree was called to play with the Bruins making him the first African American to play in the National Hockey League.

That same night the Bruins beat the Montreal Canadiens 3–0, so there was no fanfare in the fact that O’Ree was the first Black player to play in the NHL. Neither The Boston Globe nor The New York Times wrote anything about the historical event.

O’Ree would only play two games for the Bruins in the 1957–58 season. He returned to the team in the 1960–61 season and scored four goals and 10 assists for 14 points in 43 regular-season games. On Jan. 1, 1961, O’Ree also became the first Black player to score a goal in the NHL, in a 3–2 win over the Canadiens.

Racism continued to show its ugly head on and off the ice. On the ice there were always fans throwing things at him and players would make racial remarks and he would suffer body abuse.

However, during one game he returned the favor and broke his stick over a player’s head. During an interview, O’Ree shared that he was treated worse in the United States than in Canada.

He retired in 1979 at age 43. He has spent the past two decades as the NHL’s diversity ambassador, working to expand the sport.

O’Ree has received many accolades since his retirement. In 1998, he became the NHL’s director of Youth Development and an ambassador for the NHL Diversity program. He traveled throughout the United States promoting hockey programs, with a focus on serving economically disadvantaged children.

In 2003, he was named the Lester Patrick trophy winner for his outstanding service to hockey in the United States. O’Ree received the Order of Canada in 2010 for his outstanding service to youth development and promoting hockey within North America.

He also received the Order of New Brunswick (2005) and was named an honored member of the New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame, where he was inducted in 1984. In 2018, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

In 2021, as a celebration of Black History Month, all NHL players wore a commemorative helmet decal honoring O’Ree from January 16 to February 28.

In 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden signed the Willie O’Ree Congressional Gold Medal Act. The bill awarded O’Ree a Congressional Gold Medal, the U.S. Congress’ highest honor, for his contributions to “hockey, inclusion and recreational opportunity.”

O’Ree is the first player in NHL history to receive the honor.

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Bay Area

Nigerian Ambassador Visits Oakland

The Nigerian embassy came to the Oakland Airport Executive Hotel from June 3-5, 2022, in response to complaints of delays in processing passports and lack of access to embassy support. 

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By Uche Uwahemu

The Nigerian Embassy in Washington, DC was in Oakland for three days recently to provide needed passport services to Nigerians in the Bay Area and beyond.

The Nigerian embassy came to the Oakland Airport Executive Hotel from June 3-5, 2022, in response to complaints of delays in processing passports and lack of access to embassy support.

Seen as a way of taking the embassy to the people, the event brought with it some dignitaries, including Nigerian Ambassador/Deputy Chief of Mission Mukhtar Ibrahim Bashir, Embassy Minister Peter Edako, and Nigerian Head of Mission/US Embassy Amiru Abdulmajid.

“Our goal is to meet Nigerian citizens where they are and provide services to them,” said Bashir. “I think we met our goal with more than 400 people that received services in Oakland alone.”

The president of Nigerian American Public Affairs Committee (NAPAC), Dr. Veronica Ofoegbune, echoed the sentiment of the ambassador by saying, “this event is an absolute success and we are happy that Nigerians took advantage of the opportunity to renew their passports.”

The ambassador and his team also met with Oakland City Councilmember Loren Taylor to discuss the possible business opportunities and sister city bilateral relationships between Oakland and Nigeria.  “Nigeria is one of the largest markets in Africa,” said Taylor. “I welcome the opportunity to open that market for our small businesses and investors from Oakland.”

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