Connect with us

The Philadelphia Tribune

5 ways to save money on an RV road trip

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — Heading out on a road trip in a recreational vehicle allows travelers a unique opportunity to explore the nation while enjoying some comforts, too.

Published

on

Heading out on a road trip in a recreational vehicle allows travelers a unique opportunity to explore the nation while enjoying some comforts, too.

“It’s not so much about just getting to where you’re going and stopping when you’re there, but you really get to enjoy the journey,” says Julie Hall, a spokesperson for AAA. “It’s also a cost-effective way to travel, or it can be at least.”

But RV travel still comes with some expenses. Here’s how to keep them in check.

1. Choose a smaller vehicle

RVs range from small campers and towable trailers to grand motor homes over 40 feet long. Whether you rent or buy, the bigger you go, the more it’ll cost.

“People can opt for a big luxury coach and pay thousands of dollars a week, or they can get a small [one] for a fraction of that price,” says Chuck Woodbury, editor for RVtravel.com, who adds that larger vehicles typically offer less fuel efficiency and flexibility. “When you decide you need to get some milk or cereal or want to go out and hit the local tavern, well, you’ve got to move your home to do that.”

For some, a roomier RV may be necessary to accommodate large groups. In that case, save money by splitting the cost with fellow travelers.

2. Use fuel efficiently

Prepare to spend more at the pump; RVs get about 6 to 18 mpg, depending on the size and model, Woodbury says. Cars average about 24 mpg.

Hall recommends using AAA’s gas cost calculator to estimate the expense upfront. If the total exceeds your fuel budget, try a few saving strategies:

Use an app like GasBuddy to map out gas stations along the route and identify locations with the lowest prices.

Pay with a credit card that offers rewards on gas purchases.

Slow down. “The faster you go, the more you’re going to burn. If you’re not in a big hurry, then go 60 [mph] instead of 70,” Woodbury says.

3. Find free (or cheap) destinations

While you’ll avoid the cost of staying in hotels, you could still face fees for camping plus hooking up to water, sewer and electricity. The good news: There are plenty of affordable campsites. With an RV, you can camp free overnight on U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands and in Walmart parking lots, where allowed.

Ellie Quinlan and Brad Hartland, who have been traveling and living out of their yellow VW van for the past several months, search for free spots on websites like iOverlander.com and FreeCampsites.net.

“They include everything from campsites to free public land to truck stops,” Hartland says. “For each site, there’ll be a review. You can see the last time someone was there and get a sense of what you’re getting yourself into,” Quinlan adds.

You can also save money on RV rentals if you’re willing to drive between certain destinations. For example, Cruise America has “one-way specials,” which discount fees for travelers who pick up and drop off their vehicles in specific cities. Look for other area-based deals online and ask seasoned RV travelers for recommendations via blogs and community groups.

4. Bring your own food

Many RVs come equipped with refrigerators and cooktops, making real meals possible on the road. Stock up on fresh produce and your favorite fixings for sandwiches for a cheaper — and healthier — alternative to eating at diners and fast-food joints.

Grocery stores can provide amenities along the way, too. “Trader Joe’s has free coffee and samples, and almost all have private, clean bathrooms,” Quinlan says.

If you want to sprinkle in a few restaurant meals, research your options. Before the trip, plan where you might eat and see if there are discounts available, Hall says.

5. Join a club

Memberships and loyalty programs offer a wide variety of perks. A one-year, $44 membership for the camping club Passport America includes a 50% discount per night on stays throughout its network of RV campgrounds. There may be exclusions, though, often during popular travel times like Fourth of July and Labor Day weekends. Check availability at each location in advance.

“If a park fills up in the summer, they’re not probably going to want to offer half price when they can get full price. But in the off-season, they will gladly take half price,” Woodbury says.

Other memberships can help you save year-round. Find out about rewards-club benefits at places like gas stations, grocery stores and sporting goods stores.

This article originally appeared in The Philadelphia Tribune

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

#NNPA BlackPress

Miami Times, Philadelphia Tribune, St. Louis American – Big Winners During NNPA’s 2019 Merit Awards

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Brenda Andrews Publisher of the New Journal and Guide newspaper in Norfolk, Va., won the coveted Publisher of the Year Award at the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) annual convention in Cincinnati on Thursday, June 27.

Published

on

New Journal and Guide’s Brenda Andrews Earns Publisher of Year

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Brenda Andrews publisher of the New Journal and Guide newspaper in Norfolk, Va., won the coveted Publisher of the Year Award at the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) annual convention in Cincinnati on Thursday, June 27.

Andrews, who hosted last year’s convention, was greeted with a standing ovation as she ascended the platform to accept the award from NNPA Foundation Chair Amelia Ashley-Ward, the publisher of the San Francisco Sun Reporter.

The Miami Times (10 awards), Philadelphia Tribune (9), and St. Louis American (7) were the biggest winners of the night.

Included in the Miami Times’ awards was the John B. Russwurm Trophy that’s presented to the newspaper that accumulates the most points in NNPAF’s annual journalism competition.

During the ceremony, Ashley-Ward asked for prayers for Miami Times Publisher Rachel Reeves whom Ashley-Ward announced was gravely ill.

Westside Gazette Publisher Bobby Henry accepted the awards on behalf of the Miami Times and pledged to personally deliver them to Reeves and her family.

In 1827, Russwurm co-founded Freedom’s Journal with Samuel E. Cornish, the country’s first African American-owned and operated newspaper with the credo: “We wish to plead our own cause. Too long have others spoken for us.”

The awards were hosted by MillerCoors.

Other NNPA partners and sponsors include: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; General Motors; Pfizer Rare Disease; RAI Services Company; Ford; Macy’s; Wells Fargo; P&G; Volkswagen; American Petroleum Institute; AARP; Ascension; AmeriHealth Caritas; Fifth Third Bank; and the National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation (NNPAF).

California Sen. Kamala Harris opened the program via a video message of support and encouragement.

“Thank you for the work that you do … a free and independent Black Press is critical,” Harris said.

The 2020 presidential hopeful who received the 2018 NNPA Newsmaker of the Year Award during a ceremony last year, couldn’t attend the event because she was in Florida participating in the second night of debates for Democratic candidates.

During the ceremony, Ford and General Motors formally announced scholarship awards while Kerri Watkins, the publisher of the New York Daily Challenge, handed out the George Curry Award in honor of the late Black Press editor.

Among the highlights were the award for Best Editorial, which went to the Miami Times.

The St. Louis American and the Los Angeles Sentinel finished second and third respectively in that category.

The St. Louis American earned first place in the Best Column Writing category while the Miami Times finished second and the Michigan Chronicle third.

The Philadelphia Tribune took the top prize in the Community Service Award category while the Michigan Chronicle finished second and the Miami Times third.

The Final Call earned top honors for Best News Story, while the Birmingham Times finished second and Texas Metro News earned the third place prize.

The Birmingham Times earned first place for Best Feature Story while the Atlanta Voice and Houston Defender finished second and third.

In the Best News Picture category, the Richmond Free Press won first place followed by the New Pittsburgh Courier and the Philadelphia Tribune.

The Los Angeles Sentinel won top honors in the Best Editorial Cartoon category while the Washington Afro-American won second and third place.

In the Best Layout Design Category, the Birmingham Times won first place while the Philadelphia Tribune and the New Pittsburgh Courier finished second and third.

The Philadelphia Tribune, St. Louis American and Houston Forward Times won first, second and third place respectively for Best Special Edition.

The Miami Times, Houston Forward Times and Washington Informer finished first, second, and third in the Best Youth Section category and the Miami Times, Gary Crusader and the Washington Afro-American finished first, second and third in the Best Use of Photographs category.

“We are all winners tonight,” Ashley-Ward said. “When one of us wins, we all win.”

View the recorded livestream of the ceremony below.

 

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Godfather of Funk George Clinton decides to let the music keep playing

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — We know him and love him as the Godfather of Funk. But George Clinton is so much more. After singing doo-wop on street corners in his hometown of Plainfield, New Jersey, as a teenager, Clinton was just a young musician when he opened a barbershop and began to style hair.

Published

on

By Rita Charleston

We know him and love him as the Godfather of Funk. But George Clinton is so much more.

After singing doo-wop on street corners in his hometown of Plainfield, New Jersey, as a teenager, Clinton was just a young musician when he opened a barbershop and began to style hair.

“We did the great finger waves of the ‘50s. To be a singer during that era, you had to have your hair done,” Clinton recalls. “And so the barbershop became the R&B star of the neighborhood. It also gave me a place to rehearse my own kind of music.”

And rehearse he did, for when he was not styling hair, Clinton was making music and forming Parliament-Funkadelic — or P-Funk — a collection of rotating musicians made up of two individual bands, Parliament and Funkadelic. Their distinctive funk style drew on psychedelic culture, outlandish fashion, science fiction, and surreal humor.

Influenced by the likes of late 1960s artists such as Jimi Hendrix, Sly Stone and Frank Zappa, Clinton later moved to Detroit and developed a relationship with Motown where he became a songwriter and producer.

“To me, being there was like being with one big, happy family,” says Clinton, who will be appearing June 6 at Franklin Music Hall. “There was Smokey Robinson and Berry Gordy, and production teams like Ashford and Simpson, and so many more. And they all left a lasting impression on me.”

Eventually leaving Motown, Clinton settled in with different record labels for a time. And the P-Funk music ruled Black music during the 1970s thanks to Clinton’s magical managerial style, with 1978-79 being their most successful year.

But the 1980s saw Clinton becoming more and more embroiled in legal matters resulting from a myriad of royalty issues, and eventually deciding to strike out on his own. But his musical roots were never far behind.

The early 1990s saw the rise of funk-inspired rap, thanks to folks like Dr. Dre, and funk rock, thanks to the Red Hot Chili Peppers. All that helped reestablish this music man as one of the most important forces in the recent history of Black music.

But Clinton never had any doubts that he and funk were in it for the long haul.

“I always felt like we were gonna kill with our music. Everybody wants to have fun and that’s what funk is all about,” he says.

And the business has recognized what Clinton is all about many, many times. Over the years he’s received a Grammy, a Dove (gospel), and an MTV music award. He’s also been recognized by BMI, the NAACP Image award, and Motown Alumni Association for Lifetime Achievement. Clinton’s Parliament/Funkadelic was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997.

And although this tour was to be Clinton’s last, he seems to have changed his mind. He says with all the legal problems continuing, he’s decided to keep going for at least another year.

“So as of now I have no immediate plans to retire. Maybe next year I’ll be ready to take it easy. But I still enjoy what I do,” he says.

This article originally appeared in The Philadelphia Tribune

Continue Reading

Food

Philly chefs offer favorite recipes to feast on for National Burger Day

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE — Americans eat around 50 billion burgers each year. That equals an average of three burgers a week for everyone in the United States. Imagine if you put all of those burgers in a straight line, it would wrap around the Earth more than 32 times.

Published

on

By Jamyra Perry

Americans eat around 50 billion burgers each year. That equals an average of three burgers a week for everyone in the United States. Imagine if you put all of those burgers in a straight line, it would wrap around the Earth more than 32 times.

Although hamburgers originated in Hamburg, Germany, eating a burger on a bun is actually an American tradition. The hamburger as we know is rumored to have been invented in Seymour, Wisconsin. Each year, the city hosts a hamburger festival called Burger Fest.

To celebrate this truly American holiday, we asked some of Philly’s hottest chefs to share their favorite burger recipes.

Bison Burger

Caramelized onion aioli

8-ounce bison patty

Brioche roll

Smoked tomatoes

Gruyere cheese

Crispy onions

Caramelized Onion Aioli

1/4 cup caramelized onions

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 teaspoons lemon juice

1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

Several grinds black pepper

Instructions: Mix ingredients in a large bowl. Taste and adjust seasonings. Refrigerate in covered dish until ready to use.

Inspiration — “The Bison Burger is an ode to America as bison is one of the few animals that is truly native to this land. The leanness provides a much different taste and texture compared to traditional beef. All in all, a true American burger.” —Chef Elijah Milligan

Chef Elijah has spent the last several years cooking or consulting behind many restaurant projects on both the east and west coast, including restaurants such as Petit Green (San Francisco), Stateside (Philadelphia), Angele (Napa), Bottega (Yountville), and Laurel and Vernick (Philadelphia). Elijah’s most recent projects include Cooking for Culture, which is essentially a platform for minority chefs to express their passion for cooking.

Chef Nai’s Ultimate Turkey Burger

3 pounds fresh ground turkey

2 tablespoons of mayo

1 tablespoon siracha

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1 Vidalia onion medium dice

2 cloves minced garlic

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 tablespoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons Belgium beer

1. Mix all ingredients with a spoon folding in gently.

2. Form 2-inch thick patties placing a thumbprint in the center of the burger for even cooking.

3. Place on the grill 8-10 minutes on each side then remove.

4. Top with two slices of muenster cheese and place in the oven on 400 degrees until cheese is bubbling.

Place burger on a fresh brioche bun and enjoy.

Inspiration: “This is the burger that I make at home all of the time. It’s one of my favorite burgers.” —Chef Naimah Rutling

Chef Nai is a chef, caterer and mother of five. She was born and raised in North Philadelphia and learned to cook from her father and uncle. The busy mom/fitness instructor teaches about seven classes a week, in addition to serving as an Ambassador for Wellness with Cooks Who Cares. The organization helps chefs and cooks maintain a healthy lifestyle.

No matter how you choose to celebrate National Burger Day on Tuesday, make sure you enjoy all the delicious ways you can customize your burger — add bacon, ketchup, lettuce, tomatoes, mayo and any other favorite fixings.

This article originally appeared in The Philadelphia Tribune

Continue Reading

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending