Connect with us

New Tri-State Defender

WGC: Fast, furious golf schedule leaves little time for practice, rest

NEW TRI-STATE DEFENDER — It only took one round of golf at the British Open for Tiger Woods to dash the hopes of fans hoping to see him this week at the FedEx-St. Jude World Golf Championships this week.

Published

on

By Lee Eric Smith

It only took one round of golf at the British Open for Tiger Woods to dash the hopes of fans hoping to see him this week at the FedEx-St. Jude World Golf Championships this week.

“It’s more frustrating than anything else because this is a major championship and I love playing in these events,” Woods said after finishing two rounds at 6-over 148 with no birdies on the par 5s for the week. “And unfortunately, I’ve only had a chance to win one of them and was able to do it. But the other three, I didn’t do very well.”

Given his considerable health issues – multiple back and knee surgeries, a 2017 bout with addiction to prescription painkillers – it might have been a pipe dream for fans to expect Woods to play two major events in consecutive weeks in any case.

“I just want some time off. Just to get away from it,” Woods said after bowing out at the British Open. “There’s been a lot of travel, a lot of time in the air, a lot of moving around, different hotels . . . I just want to go home.”

But even younger golfers are having to adjust to how fast the major golf tournaments are coming around. Woods’ won The Masters in April. The PGA Championship was in May. The U.S. Open was in June, and July brings two majors: The British Open last week and this week’s WGC at TPC Southwind here in Memphis.

“I think everyone’s been trying to figure out the schedule this year, for sure,” said Justin Rose said in his pre-WGC remarks. “For me now, it’s about – this is I would say my last chance to position myself before the Playoffs really get underway.”

“It seems yesterday we were playing in Augusta and all of a sudden the four majors are gone,” said Italian golfer Francesco Molinari, who is skipping the World Golf Championships event this week. “So I think it’s something that hopefully next year we will get more used to it. But this year it’s been a big change.”

Molinari wasn’t alone in his thinking.

“The schedule has been tough this year,” Tommy Fleetwood said. “If you’re not playing great, you actually don’t have time this year to develop your game because you don’t have that time to take periods off, really. You’re constantly playing and you always have to turn up and perform with the way that it goes.”

Rory McIlroy and Jason Day played miserably at the The British Open, failing to make the cut. But does the extra rest give them an advantage for the WGC?

“They’re more rested than I am or than others are, but I’m sure they also wish that they had played well and they felt better about their game,” said Justin Thomas. “For me, I feel like I’ve had success in the past of playing weeks in a row. That’s kind of why I’m hoping to let that momentum go for another about five weeks or so and see if we can keep it rolling.”

First timers, sort of

Many of the golfers have played in the FedEx-St. Jude Invitational. And many have also played the WGC Championship. But this is the first year that the WGC has been played in Memphis, so it will be a new experience for everyone.

“I’ve always wanted to play this golf course and I’ve always wanted to play this tournament,” Thomas said. “Just being the week before the U.S. Open, the timing didn’t make sense and it didn’t work out. So unfortunately we have to miss a lot of tournaments because of scheduling.”

Wolfe played 18 holes at TPC Southwind on Tuesday, and gained an appreciation for the challenges it will bring.

“This is the first time I saw the course and I can see why it’s a tough golf course,” Wolfe said. “It’s narrow fairways, greens are small and fast, and if this place firms up, I could definitely see it being one of the hardest on Tour. I’m really excited to see where my game holds up against these guys.”

Brooks Koepka is no stranger to TPC Southwind, having played 20 rounds on the course, including last year’s FedEx-St. Jude Invitational.

“I love this place. This place has always been good to me. I feel like I play it really well,” Koepka said. “I enjoy the golf course, I enjoy Memphis. It’s a fun place to come back year after year, so I’ve enjoyed it. This golf course, obviously with a little bit of rain, it’s a little bit softer than it has been in years past, but the golf course is in probably the best shape I’ve seen it the last four years.”

‘Cue before Tee?

You knew this was coming. Anytime a major event brings celebrities to Memphis, media has to ask them about barbecue. It may be mandatory. But the golfers took the questions in stride.

“I’m excited to go get some barbecue at some point,” Thomas said. “It’s similar to Alabama, we had some pretty good barbecue places in Tuscaloosa. I’ll try to check at least a barbecue spot or two out. I know it’s going to be an enjoyable week.”

Justin Rose said he’s looking forward to sampling the Bluff City’s food and culture.

“I’ve never been here before, so I just feel like there’s a really nice vibe out there,” Rose said. “I’m looking forward to experiencing all that Memphis has to offer. Sorry to kind of hedge the question, but yeah, give me a couple days.”

But no ‘cue for Koepka.

“I always bring a chef this week,” he said. “Barbecue isn’t really on my diet unfortunately. We stick to the house.”

Associated Press golf writer Doug Ferguson contributed to this report.

Share this:

This article originally appeared in the New Tri-State Defender

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

#NNPA BlackPress

OP-ED: A SouslvilleUSA strategy for crime reduction

NEW TRI-STATE DEFENDER — Dedicated community organizations such as LeMoyne-Owen and its 160 years of educating young people; STAX Records and its historic creation of the “music of our lives” that represented an era of progress for Black people; Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King would meet and strategize; the intersection of Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue, where Ida B. Wells and Peeples Grocery stood as a testament to Black business success, and the world-famous Four Way Grill were all founded on this historical ground.
The post OP-ED: A SouslvilleUSA strategy for crime reduction first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Published

on

By

By Jeffrey T. Higgs, New Tri-State Defender

As crime and the perception of crime explodes around our city, I am drawn to facts and theories I have developed over the years regarding crime, its causes and how best to reduce it.

Contrary to what you hear, crime has been reduced in our city, especially in areas where urban community economic development (UCED) has occurred and is led by community-engaged leaders, CDCs, nonprofits and churches, all working together to ensure our communities are safe places to live, work and play.

One such community is SoulsvilleUSA.

When we started this journey in 1999, community leaders like Marlon Foster, Andy Cates, Reginald Milton, Robert Lipscomb, Deannie Parker and others collaborated with LeMoyne-Owen College and Metropolitan Baptist Church, to create a place where residents felt safe, families could thrive, children could learn, and all were welcomed.

What we knew then was we were working on “holy ground.”

Dedicated community organizations such as LeMoyne-Owen and its 160 years of educating young people; STAX Records and its historic creation of the “music of our lives” that represented an era of progress for Black people; Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King would meet and strategize; the intersection of Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue, where Ida B. Wells and Peeples Grocery stood as a testament to Black business success, and the world-famous Four Way Grill were all founded on this historical ground.

In this community, Al Green and Hi Records produced some of the greatest music of our time and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his final speech at the historic Mason Temple.

How, then, does this history relate to crime reduction in our community?

Our collective belief is that the best way to reduce crime is to create equal economic development opportunities.

We know that a working person is less likely to commit a crime than a person who lives in poverty with no prospects of attaining sustainable income.

Moreover, a house that has a family living in it is not one that is blighted; clean streets create pride in the community.

Educated residents know how to call code enforcement and report crimes, and an informed community is a community that values itself and its neighbors.

Simply stated, the roots of crime are poverty, blight, neglect and lack of educational opportunities.

We do not have to live this way.

Crime and violence, then, are a result of our environment and how we train our children, how we treat our citizens and how we respect our neighbors.

The Bible speaks eloquently about loving thy neighbor as thyself. Violence, crime, and gun abuse are destroying our families and communities.

We must fight the elements of violence mentioned above. We do this simply by creating places that are livable and inviting.

It is our responsibility, as the adults, to create and show our youth the right pathways to success. No community wants violence and crime permeating the mindsets and behavior of its citizens.

We must fight these evils with aggressive policies and funding that assist communities in this work. Programs that are effective are needed to help in the fight for crime and violence reduction.

SoulsvilleUSA has taken steps to move in this direction. We recently collaborated with residents and created a Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District for South Memphis/SoulsvilleUSA that was a result of hundreds of residents working together for a common goal.

The ongoing effort of the SoulsvilleUSA Neighborhoods Development District to secure a TIF (tax-increment financing) designation for South Memphis led to this December 2021 gathering. (Photos: Gary S. Whitlow/GSW Enterprises/The New Tri-State Defender Archives)

The ongoing effort of the SoulsvilleUSA Neighborhoods Development District to secure a TIF (tax-increment financing) designation for South Memphis led to this December 2021 gathering. (Photos: Gary S. Whitlow/GSW Enterprises/The New Tri-State Defender Archives)

We believe, as a community, we are headed in the right direction. We are incorporating lessons learned from other thriving communities that have achieved success and applying them in our own neighborhoods.

We will revitalize our community using all the tools available in the toolbox.

As we enact this revitalization, our communities, hopefully, will begin to turn on the “lights of hope.”

We then can educate, inform, engage and revitalize all areas of our community, creating jobs for residents, removing blight and replacing it with positivity and hope.

While we cannot promise a “chicken in every pot,” we can promise we will work to create healthy, open inviting spaces, where crime has no place to hide.

Our dedication to this impactful work will provide jobs to those willing to work, create innovative educational technology and workforce training opportunity for those desiring to learn new skills and bring their skillsets back to the community.

These opportunities will be for those who would rather work than rob, cheat, or steal from their neighbor.

We are our neighbors’ keeper, and we will work to revitalize our community, thus bringing everyone along with opportunities to become engaged in the process of this revitalization movement.

Please plan to walk with us at 10 a.m. April 9, starting and ending at the corner of Walker Ave. and Dr. Hollis F Price Boulevard (Metropolitan Baptist Church), as the Memphis Crime Commission, FFUN- Stop the Killing, Memphis Police Department, City of Memphis, community partners, students, residents and your neighbors walk through SoulsvilleUSA and College Park to bring awareness to gun violence in our community.

Registration begins at 9 a.m. Resource partners will be available to provide private services and assistance for residents, as well as answers and connections for the community’s needs.

(Jeffrey T. Higgs is an executive committee member of the Memphis and Shelby County Crime Commission, a founding member of the SoulsvilleUSA Neighborhoods Development District, and CEO of LeMoyne-Owen College CDC and has worked since 1999 on revitalizing communities and creating economic development opportunities for residents of Memphis.)

This article originally appeared in the New Tri-State Defender

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

COMMENTARY: #ACCESS901 — ‘Alexa, homeschool my kids!’

THE NEW TRI-STATE DEFENDER — “I actually moved our son’s desk from his room into my workspace to help him understand, WE ARE STILL LEARNING AND WORKING. Our new norm is that we do these things TOGETHER. I have a bell … and even made a hall pass for him to do things like go to the rest room or get a drink of water. According to him, I am doing way too much!”

Published

on

(Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

By Joy Doss, The New Tri-State Defender

Shelter-in-place mandates have -- for now -- made homeschooling part of the norm and some parents and guardians are having to dig deep.

Shelter-in-place mandates have — for now — made homeschooling part of the norm and some parents and guardians are having to dig deep.

Millions of parents have been drop-kicked into a homeschooling situation. Like me, some already work from home. Others had to make a quick-step. Distressingly, some are furloughed and not working at all.

TSD #Access901 columnist Joy Doss. (Photo: Demarcus Bowser)

TSD #Access901 columnist Joy Doss. (Photo: Demarcus Bowser)

Regardless, it makes for fraught times as we try to figure out their stuff and our stuff at the same time. That task is piled atop pushing through cabin fever, slogging through a swamp of uncertainty and conflicting information and managing the anxiety of living in what feels like a bizarre dystopian novel.

To remain semi-sane, I meditate, exercise regularly, pray like crazy and selectively tune out the news.

All that to say, ALEXA, HOMESCHOOL MY KIDS!

Cause we ain’t ready! And we don’t know nothin’ bout this new math of theirs!


For me, it’s mostly a space invasion. My sixth-grader mostly is like a self-cleaning oven – very independent and wants no help. But she gone get this supervision. We review assignments daily. Her school was online within days, operating via Google Meet and Google Classroom,  which means her teachers are still doing the teaching and I am not responsible for creating a makeshift curriculum.

She has a designated space for her Google Meets (lighting is everything of course!) and still holes up in her dungeon/bedroom for homework. We are fortunate to have both a laptop for her and a tablet. Outside of Google Meets and assignment deadlines, she is on a loose schedule. My main rule is homework and classwork finished by 5 p.m.! I also keep her weekly tutor appointment, now via FaceTime.

I checked in with some mommy friends to see what’s up with them.

Cherhonda Mason-Ayers, a married mom with a fifth-grade student in Shelby County Schools, has been teaching for 17 years. She has a different approach:

“I actually moved our son’s desk from his room into my workspace to help him understand, WE ARE STILL LEARNING AND WORKING. Our new norm is that we do these things TOGETHER. I have a bell … and even made a hall pass for him to do things like go to the restroom or get a drink of water. According to him, I am doing way too much!”

She gauges good stopping points between their respective Zoom meetings, laughing at the thought of such.

Her son’s teachers provide assignments on Sunday evenings and use Zoom to have face-to-face meetings and answer questions about assignments.

Her advice for keeping it together? “PRAYER! Once we move beyond this pandemic, I hope people will realize how important human connection is!”


‘Psalms 91 is my bestie right about now’

The stay-at-home mandates have forced Ann Perry Wallace and her three children – ages 10, almost 16 and 17 – to slow their normally fast-paced family life down.

An actress, writer and program manager at Playback Memphis, Ann often works at home, so creating and converting separate corners for everyone was imperative. Coincidentally, they just moved into a larger home in midtown.

“I do make them get up, wash up, get on decent clothes and get their breakfast before starting so they can feel like they’re doing more than just playing around,” she said. “I have carved out a makeshift office in my bedroom. I get up, pray, meditate, shower, get dressed, get coffee and breakfast, make up the bed.”

The bed made signals the start of the workday.

Her husband, Darius, shares the kiddo responsibilities. The Wallace kids mostly manage without their parents, “attending” school through distance learning models. They prepare their own breakfast and lunch and have dinner as a family.

Periodically throughout the day, the Wallaces stop so Darius can lead the family in Tai Chi practice.

“This relaxes and energizes us,” Ann says.

Like Cherhonda, Ann relies on prayer. “I cannot control what happens so I have to pray. Psalms 91 is my bestie right about now.”

My friend Kelly Hodrick lives in Union, NJ, where she is mom to Carter, who is in pre-K, and third-grader Malcolm. At 8 a.m., she’s attempting to log into work, fix breakfast and open home school for the day.

She normally works from home once a week; having the kiddos adds a twist. The family is working to create a schedule close to what is normal for the kids, who take breaks throughout the day and must complete their assignments by 4:30 p.m.

“Third grade is fully up and running via Google Classroom. Assignments…posted daily…are a combination of both class ‘lessons,’ homework, as well as projects and quizzes. For Pre-K, the daycare has recently started daily 30-minute classes via Zoom for the kids to reconnect and share and also reinforce learning, including sight word development, reading, storytelling, show and tell, etc.”

Her older son’s school has provided helpful online resources that have been a part of the regular curriculum.

Her recommendations for sanity?

“Prayer, daily scriptures (Biblestudytools.com), DJ D-NICE Club Quarantine, Drizly liquor delivery, daily kee-keeing with my girls and my line sisters.”

Be encouraged all. And remember – We’re Memphis Strong!

(Resources: Free curriculum, www.alicefayeduncan.com; WKNO and Bounce for all ages school on TV; work exercises for all ages, www.IXL.com. If your child’s school doesn’t provide access, the monthly membership is about $20 per child ($4 for each additional child) for core classes.)

This article originally appeared in the New Tri-State Defender

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Mother-son nonprofit looking to drive home Easter’s spirit

THE NEW TRI-STATE DEFENDER — The five-year old co-powering this deed is Carl Grandberry V. He and his partner-mother Shauna Jones-Grandberry have arranged to be on the old K-Mart parking lot on Austin Peay at noon Saturday morning (April 10) for a socially-distanced, drive-thru give away of Easter baskets.

Published

on

Five-year-old Carl Grandberry V is at home with the Easter baskets set for special delivery. (Photo: Shauna Jones-Grandberry)

By Karanja A. Ajanaku, The New Tri-State Defender

Child’s Dream International’s 2nd annual “Easter Basket Giveaway” is going forward – far from initially planned – with the goal of giving away 100 Easter baskets to “less fortunate children in our community.”

The five-year old co-powering this deed is Carl Grandberry V. He and his partner-mother Shauna Jones-Grandberry have arranged to be on the old K-Mart parking lot on Austin Peay at noon Saturday morning (April 10) for a socially-distanced, drive-thru give away of Easter baskets.

Shauna Jones-Grandberry. (Screen capture)

Shauna Jones-Grandberry. (Screen capture)

Last year, the Child’s Dream nonprofit gave away 45 baskets on the campus of LeMoyne-Owen College. The 2020 growth plan targeted 100. The evening before distribution, baskets totaled 130 as donations still were being accepted. The growth plan hadn’t accounted for the level of generosity stirred during a pandemic.

Adjusting to mitigation measures in place to counter the spread of the coronavirus, Jones-Grandberry, Carl and Child’s Dream volunteers will dispense baskets and more via a drive-through operation. Some in need have called ahead. No reservations were required.

While the COVID-19 public health emergency has affected the giveaway in multiple ways, the idea’s roots are pre-pandemic and start with Carl, a Downtown Elementary School student.

“Well, this is something that he came up with on his own at age four,” Jones-Grandberry said. “Where it came from, I don’t know. It’s just something that he just up and said one day when he was outside playing.”

The “this” and “it” amounts to collecting toys and such “not for himself, but for less fortunate children in Memphis.” It has involved dipping into his allowance, money from family and friends and, increasingly, donations. From it has come events such as Christmas toy drives and the template Easter basket giveaway.

Jones-Grandberry manages the supply line, posting event solicitations online and strategically using donations to support the online workforce “like the young lady who was selling baskets. I didn’t go to your local Walmart or Kmart. They already have money. So what we did was supported the people who were trying to make extra money.”

Still, there is the coronavirus.

“People’s not even thinking about Easter and we’re still focused on it,” said Jones Grandberry. “We’re so focused on trying to make these children smile, knowing that they’re going to get an Easter basket.”

With resolve, she added, “I’m going to make a way. It’s going to happen…because this is something my son wants to do. … There’s people out there that are less fortunate and you have to be nice to them. Like I said, my son don’t like to see other kids sad. He wants them to have everything he has….(He’s) just learning how to share and give.”

Does he know about the virus?

“Yeah, he knows. Well, we talk about that every day,” she said. “We got all this different medicines and I’ve been to the grocery store. He’s sanitizing his hands more and washing his hands more and taking precautions on different things. He asks…and then he looks at the news. He’s five years old, acting like he’s 50.”

It’s not all business for five-year-old Carl. Shelter-in-place restrictions mean home is school. “We do (school) work every day. …It’s OK, because not only do we do papers ourselves that the teacher had sent home with him, he gets on ABCMouse(.com, a subscription-based digital education program) and i-Ready or something. I have to ask him. He knows more about it than I do. We just set aside time every day”

The physical activity Carl used to do in the gym, he now does at home, push-ups included.

“The only thing he’s doing differently than he did in school, in school they don’t watch TV. He gets to watch TV,” Jones-Grandberry said.

And, with Easter approaching, he’s gotten to amplify on his story to news media, including a telephone exchange with TSDMemphis.com.

Carl Grandberry V (Courtesy photo)

Carl Grandberry V (Courtesy photo)

TSD: Hey, Carl, how are you doing?

Carl: Good.

TSD: Do you know what a newspaper is?

Carl: Hello? I can’t hear you!

TSD: I said, do you know what a newspaper is?

Carl: Yes.

TSD: Well, I run a newspaper and I want to put your story in it. How about that?

Carl: OK.

 TSD: You’re OK with that?

Carl: Yes.

TSD: Now, I understand you’re going to be helping children again for Easter. Is that right?

Carl: Yes.

TSD: OK. Well, why are you doing it?

Carl: Because I want kids to be happy and excited.

TSD: Yeah! So now, are you washing your hands?

Carl: Yes.

TSD: Yes! A lot, right?

Carl: Yes.

Carl Grandberry V has a book set to come out later this month.

It’s called “The Smile Collector.”

For more information: visit https://bit.ly/3aThyXT, and A Child’s Dream International on Facebook. Click here to pre-order “The Smile Collector.”)

This article originally appeared in the New Tri-State Defender

Continue Reading

Subscribe to receive news and updates from the Oakland Post

* indicates required

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Photos courtesy of Ella Baker Center, photography by Brooke Anderson
Activism5 days ago

Over 500 Attend Police-Free Event to Reimagine Safety in Oakland

Digital Issues5 days ago

Oakland Post: Week of August 3 – August 9, 2022

#NNPA BlackPress5 days ago

Brittney Griner Sentenced to More than 9 years in Russian Prison

The City Council established a task force to discuss the racial issues involved in construction and the possibility of a Project Labor Agreement. The task force included some community members, including the publisher of the Oakland Post, and was mandated to address racial discrimination first.
Activism5 days ago

OPINION: Are We About to See the Permanent Exclusion of Most Black People from Construction Jobs in Oakland?

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Report: Human Rights Violations in Prisons Throughout Southern United States Cause Disparate and Lasting Harm in Black Communities  

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Celebrate your birthday with 10 free items

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Vice President Harris Addresses NAACP Convention; Urges Black Voter Participation

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Biden Administration Announces Steps to Lower Electricity Bills for Residents in HUD Programs

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Police Force and Top Officials Resign in Kenly, North Carolina After City Council Hires Black Women as Town Manager

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Biden-Harris Administration Announce New Actions to Address Mental Health in Schools

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Will Smith Issues Apology to Chris Rock and Family for Oscars Slap

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

Emory University Announces the first African American Studies Ph.D. Program in the U.S. Southeast

#NNPA BlackPress6 days ago

PRESS ROOM: Autism influencer Jeremiah Josey releases a new book about his experience as a Black man with autism

#NNPA BlackPress1 week ago

IN MEMORIAM: Basketball Legend Bill Russell Dies at 88

#NNPA BlackPress1 week ago

REVIEW: ‘Nope’ is a Yes! — Peele Delivers with Follow-Up

Trending