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The Marinovators Virtual Experience in Marin City

The event will happen on Saturday, Nov. 13, 2021, from noon to 3:00 p.m. at the Marin Gateway Shopping Center, 109 Donahue St., Marin City, CA. This is the first of a series of #marincity80 events leading to the 80th anniversary of Marin City on Labor Day weekend, Sept. 4, 2022, and the establishment of the Marin City Historical and Preservation Society.

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The public can sign up with the Marin City Historical Preservation Society for updates.
The public can sign up with the Marin City Historical Preservation Society for updates.

Felecia Gaston of Performing Stars of Marin and #marincity80 invites the community to the world premiere of The Marinovators, an immersive experience featuring youth from Marin City and the Bay Area who created a virtual reality experience and a soundtrack lifting up the Black workers who worked at Marinship during World War II.

The event will happen on Saturday, Nov. 13, 2021, from noon to 3:00 p.m. at the Marin Gateway Shopping Center, 109 Donahue St., Marin City, CA

This is the first of a series of #marincity80 events leading to the 80th anniversary of Marin City on Labor Day weekend, Sept. 4, 2022, and the establishment of the Marin City Historical and Preservation Society.

A live painting installation by muralist James Shields, featuring Ms. Annie Small, Ms. Rodessa Battle, Mr. Joseph James, and Rev. Leon Samuels who were Black workers and welders in 1942 at the Marinship.

The public can sign up with the Marin City Historical Preservation Society for updates.

Web site: Marincity80.com

Linktree:https://linktr.ee/themarinovatoes

Instagram: @marincity80

Facebook: Performing Stars of Marin

For more information, contact performingstars@icloud or (415) 332-8316

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Black History

Book Review: ‘The Jazzmen: How Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and Count Basie Transformed America’

Your toes didn’t wait long before they started tapping. They knew what was coming, almost as soon as the band was seated. They knew before the first notes were played and the hep cats and jazz babies hit the floor to cut a rug. Daddy, it was the bee’s knees but in the new book “The Jazzmen” by Larry Tye, if you were the Sheik on the stage, makin’ cabbage wasn’t all that swank.

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Courtesy of Lisa Frusztajer
Courtesy of Lisa Frusztajer

By Terri Schlichenmeyer

Your toes didn’t wait long before they started tapping.

They knew what was coming, almost as soon as the band was seated. They knew before the first notes were played and the hep cats and jazz babies hit the floor to cut a rug. Daddy, it was the bee’s knees but in the new book “The Jazzmen” by Larry Tye, if you were the Sheik on the stage, makin’ cabbage wasn’t all that swank.

Louis Armstrong was born in 1900 or thereabouts in a “four-room frame house on an unpaved lane” in a section of New Orleans called “Back o’Town … the Blackest, swampiest, and most impoverished” area of the city. His mother was a “chippie,” and the boy grew up running barefoot and wild, the latter of which led to trouble. At age twelve, Armstrong was sent to the Colored Waif’s Home for recalcitrant Black boys, and that changed his life. At the “home,” he found mentors, father-figures and love, and he discovered music.

For years, Bill “Count” Basie insisted that he’d grown up with “no-drama, no-mystery, and nobody’s business but his,” but the truth was “sanitized.” He hated school and dropped out in junior high, hoping to join the circus. Instead, he landed a job working in a “moving-picture theater” as a general worker. When the theater’s piano player didn’t come to work one day, Basie volunteered to sit in. He ultimately realized that “I had to get out … of Red Bank [New Jersey], and music was my ticket.”

Even as a young teenager, Edward Ellington insisted that he be treated like a superstar. By then, his friends had nicknamed him “Duke,” for his insistence on dressing elegantly and acting like he was royalty. And he surely was — to his mother, and to millions of swooning female fans later in his life.

Three men, born at roughly the same time, had more in common than their ages. Two of them had mothers “who doted” on them. All three were perform-aholics. And, for all three, “Race … fell away as America listened.”

Feel up to a time-trip back a century or more? You won’t even have to leave your seat, just grab “The Jazzmen” and hang on.

In his introduction, author Larry Tye explains why he so badly wanted to tell the story of these three giants of music and how Basie’s, Ellington’s, and Armstrong’s lives intersected and diverged as all three were near-simultaneously performing for audiences world-wide. Their stories fascinated him, and his excitement runs strong in this book. Among other allures, readers used to today’s star-powered gossip will enjoy learning about an almost-forgotten time when performers took the country by storm by bootstrapping without a retinue of dozens.

And the racism the three performers encountered disappeared like magic sometimes, and that’s a good tale all by itself.

This is a musician’s dream book, but it’s also a must-read story if you’ve never heard of Basie, Ellington, or Armstrong. “The Jazzmen” may send you searching your music library, so make note.

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Oakland Post: Week of May 15 – 21, 2024

The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post: Week of May May 15 – 21, 2024

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Oakland Post: Week of May 8 – 14, 2024

The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post: Week of May May 8 – 14, 2024

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