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San Joaquin County Women of Color & Man About Town Awards

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The African American Chamber of Commerce and Foundation of San Joaquin County will hold its annual Woman of Color and Man About Town Awards Friday, April 4 to recognize influential and inspiring men and women in the community.

 

Each year, the chamber pays tribute to its honorees that represent a portrait of diversity, integrity, and commitment to the community.

 

The keynote speaker will be Tammy Wickliffe, a physician assistant from Las Vegas, NV who specializes in wound care. A graduate of Stockton’s Franklin High School and UC Davis, Wickliffe will speak about her experience as a business owner.

City Councilman Michael Tubbs will deliver a salute to the honorees.

Award recipients include: Woman of Color – Eveline Gross Daniel, community member; Shannel Hawkins, campus leader, University of the Pacific; Dorothy L. Jones, community and social justice activist; Esperanza Vielma, Founder and CEO of the Small Business Association of California; and Jean Winston, administrative assistant, African American Chamber of Commerce of San Joaquin County.

Man About Town – Richard James Black Jr., founder and CEO of Point of No Return Transitional Living Homes; Thurnell Clayton Jr., founder and pastor of New Life Worship Center Church of God in Christ; Michael Patrick Duffy, president and CEO of Financial Center Credit Union; Tony Fitch, EOPS counselor, San Joaquin Delta College; Reginal Nichols, salon owner and cosmetologist; and Terence West, director, San Joaquin County Community Social Services-Taft Community Center.

Also, Special Youth Recognition will be given to Franklin Jarrid Leon Anfield, Franklin High School graduate; Anthony Baker, senior at Edison High School; Dara LaShaun Overton, senior at Lincoln Highl; and Marionne Roe, senior at Stagg High.

The event will begin at 6 p.m. at the Best Western Heritage Hotel, 111 E. March Lane in Stockton. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door, $25 for youth 16 and under, $90 for couples and $45 for chamber members.

For more information, call Dr. Willie Douglas at (209) 401-4754 or Paulette Amous-Gross at (209) 320-5564.

Activism

Jasmine Market Encourage Unity in Marin City

During the event, Jong Lee, Caitilin Damacion, and Tammy Lai discussed how to raise the awareness of the various ethnic groups to each other in Marin City. A mobile clinic provided free COVID-19 vaccines.

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Top: The Jasmine Market at the St. Andrew Presbyterian Church. Bottom: Jong Lee, Caitilin Damacion, Tammy Lai (Photos by Godfrey Lee)

The First Marin City’s Jasmine Market was an inclusive, outdoor market celebrating Asian joy and intercultural solidarity in honor of Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month in May.

It was hosted by the Marin City Community Development Corporation (MCCDC) and was held at the St. Andrew Presbyterian Church in Marin City on May 28, 2021.

A Marin City Librarian read an AAPI story. Sammy Brionnes gave a musical performance. Natalie Nong performed a Spoken Word poem.

During the event, Jong Lee, Caitilin Damacion, and Tammy Lai discussed how to raise the awareness of the various ethnic groups to each other in Marin City. A mobile clinic provided free COVID-19 vaccines.

Lee is the director of Women’s Rights and Peace Bay Area, and a board member for the Asian American Alliance of Marin. She is involved in advocating for ethnic studies in the Marin County School District and is working to spread awareness of the “comfort women” from Korea and other Asian nations. These women were forced to serve as sexual slaves for Japanese soldiers during WWII.

Tammy Lai is the CEO at Foundation for Justice and Peace (jpf.world).

Damacion, who lives in the East Bay, is the Micro-Enterprise Program Manager at the MCCDC.

During the discussion, Lee says that God created people in his image. We need to treat people in the image of God.

Lee really wants to see Asians, especially women, integrate with the other minorities, such as Koreans, who can become culturally isolated, and spoke to the need to bridge and understand other ethnic groups. “We need to step forward to meet each other halfway, and to reach out to understand each other,” Lee said.

Lai says that we have this opportunity, as we question ourselves in this cultural landscape, to build bridges. Communities become healthier when its members take one step toward one another to understand, listen and to build something better together.

Damacion, who is Filipino and mixed-raced, feels very strongly about building connections that are positive and beneficial to a community. Through her work with the MCCDC, she will work to advance diversity in Marin City, and will shed a light on the beauty she sees in Marin City and how people in the community took care of each other for generations.

Lai’s family immigrated from China to America after the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882. Her family history has brought her a deeper awareness of her identity. It becomes important to carry these conversations forward and share them with others.

“We all have our stories and should be open to tell them. There is nothing new under human history so we should learn to share them. You become much closer to each other,” says Lee.

For more information, go to www.marincitycdc.org/jasmine-market

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Bay Area

Vice Mayor: Business Group Wants to Buy Coliseum, Attract WNBA Team

The group will provide additional details of its effort at a news conference at 11:00 a.m. Friday at a site to be determined.

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Oakland Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan.

Oakland Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan said a local business group has made serious inroads to buy the city’s 50% stake in the Oakland Coliseum complex and to bring a WNBA team to the city.
Kaplan’s office shared a news release Monday about the effort by the African American Sports and Entertainment Group.

Kaplan said the group is in negotiations with the Oakland-Alameda Joint Powers Authority, has submitted a formal proposal to WNBA officials, and has submitted a term sheet to the city, which the City Council’s rules committee recently voted to advance to the full council for a vote.

The group will provide additional details of its effort at a news conference at 11:00 a.m. Friday at a site to be determined.

“I am pleased that there is such great interest in doing an important development at the Oakland Coliseum that will provide jobs, revenue and community positivity,” Kaplan said. “My goal is to help this process move forward before the summer recess.”

Kaplan said the group has the backing of more than 30 community groups of faith-based institutions, labor organizations, civic leaders, and job development organizations. She did not name the groups

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African American News & Issues

Black Panther Mini Museum Free to BIPOC Juneteenth Weekend

Lisbet Tellefsen is the curator, Linnea Du is the editor, Otherwise provided design, and Art Kotoulas production.

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Graphic courtesy West Oakland Mural Project.

The Mini Museum of the Black Panther Party @ The Mural opens on Juneteenth, June 19, 2021, at 831 Center St., Oakland, CA.  It’s open from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.  Tickets for up to five people for a 30-minute tour can be purchased in advance by logging onto westoaklandmuralproject.org.  Children under 12 are free as are BIPOC folks during Juneteenth weekend. Individual tickets can be purchased for $12.50.

Lisbet Tellefsen is the curator, Linnea Du is the editor, Otherwise provided design, and Art Kotoulas production.

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