Connect with us

Film

Samuel L. Jackson to join Chris Rock in reboot of horror classic ‘Saw’

ROLLINGOUT — The decorated actor will star in the anticipated Chris Rock-led reimagining of the classic horror film franchise.

Published

on

By Jeandra Lebeauf

The Saw reboot adds Samuel L. Jackson to the cast, but who exactly will he portray?

The decorated actor will star in the anticipated Chris Rock-led reimagining of the classic horror film franchise. Rock will star in the film as a detective investigating heinous crimes while Jackson will portray his father. Jackson will join co-stars Max Minghella  (William Schenk), and Marisol Nichols (Capt. Angie Garza).

Sawan eight-movie franchise, centers around a man named John Kramer who places specifically chosen people in scenarios designed to test what they’re willing to do to live. During that time, victims are presented with a series of choices that place self-preservation over the lives of others, only to discover they’ve made the wrong choice in the end.

The first installment landed in theaters in October of 2004.

Rock reportedly approached Lionsgate Entertainment with an updated, reimagined version of the cult classic. Previous Saw producers Mark Burg and Oren Koules along with director Darren Lynn Bousman, who directed Saw 2  and Saw 3, will lead the new film. The most recent version of the film titled Jigsaw appeared in theaters in 2017. Actor Tobin Bell appeared in all eight versions of the franchise as the film’s antagonist.

Additionally, it’s been a busy 2019 for Jackson, with Avengers: Endgame, Captain Marvel, Shaft and Spider-man: Far From Home in theaters.

The Saw reboot is slated to hit theaters on Oct. 23, 2020,  just in time for Halloween.

This article originally appeared in Rollingout.com.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Entertainment

‘Motherload’ Movie Plays in Sausalito October 15

The movie “Motherload” will be showing at 7:00 p.m., Friday, October 15 at Gabrielson Park near the Sausalito Ferry. People will be at the park at 6:00 p.m.

Published

on

Liz Canning

The movie “Motherload” will be showing at 7:00 p.m., Friday, October 15 at Gabrielson Park near the Sausalito Ferry. People will be at the park at 6:00 p.m.

“Motherload” captures film maker Liz Canning’s quest to understand the increasing isolation and disconnection of modern life, its planetary impact, according to the film’s we sites. “Motherload” suggest cargo bikes could be an antidote to this isolation and disconnection.

Canning is a lifelong cyclist and former bike racer who currently lives in the hills of Marin, CA, with her husband, teenage twins, and their chocolate Labrador Retriever. Canning cycled everywhere until she had twins in 2008. Motherhood was challenging, but to Liz hauling babies via car felt stifling.

Then Canning discovered the cargo bike. She goggled “family bike” and uncovered a global movement of people replacing cars with cargo bikes: long-frame bicycles designed for carrying heavy loads. Liz set out to learn more, and the movie “Motherload” was born.

“Motherload” is Canning’s feature directorial debut, and has won multiple awards. Since its world premiere in May 2019, “Motherload” has been on a global screening tour featuring over 500 live and virtual venues

“As Canning explores the burgeoning global movement to replace cars with purpose-built bikes, she learns about the bicycle’s history and potential future as the ultimate ‘social revolutionizer,” the website IMDb says. “Her experiences as a cyclist, as a mother, and in discovering the cargo bike world, teach Liz that sustainability is not necessarily about compromise and sacrifice and there are few things more empowering, in an age of consumption, than the ability to create everything from what seems to be nothing.”

In the joy and dedication of the cargo bike community Liz saw that the choice to live by bike, instead of by car, has powerful positive repercussions. These people make sustainability looking really fun! “Motherload” asks why this is so and what it can teach us about mainstream culture.

For more information, go to www.motherload.com or http://marinbike.org/sausalito

The Marin Post’s coverage of local news in Marin County is supported by the Ethnic Media Sustainability Initiative, a program created by California Black Media and Ethnic Media Services to support community newspapers across California.

Continue Reading

Activism

New Documentary Unveils Pauli Murray, Little-Known Civil Rights Activist, Feminist

I’ll admit it; I was not familiar with Pauli Murray.  Honestly, Murray’s extraordinary accomplishments in the years before and after the heyday of the Civil Rights Movement are history lessons many of us didn’t know, until now.

Published

on

Pauli Murray/ Photo Credit Wikimedia Commons

I’ll admit it; I was not familiar with Pauli Murray.  Honestly, Murray’s extraordinary accomplishments in the years before and after the heyday of the Civil Rights Movement are history lessons many of us didn’t know, until now.

An accessible compilation of mixed media running 91 minutes, “My Name Is Pauli Murray” unearths a revealing journey of extraordinary feats that pre-date the heralded stories of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr.  Pauli Murray knew intimately what it meant to live a life that was out of sync—when even language wasn’t sufficient to define or describe a journey. 

Lawyer, professor, poet, and Episcopal priest, Murray was an iconoclast who pushed against the limits—both the conventional and strict legislation and the narrow thinking around issues of race and gender equity. The struggle wasn’t abstract: Murray’s own life —as an African American intellectual whose gender identity felt fluid —personified it. 

Born in 1910, in Baltimore, Md., Pauli was taken in at 3 years old by the maternal wing of the family following the sudden death of Pauli’s mother. Embraced by loving grandparents and two aunts—Pauline and Sarah—Pauli exhibited a proficiency in reading and critical thinking, assessing, early on, the vast discrepancies in conditions African-American families lived in as compared to their white counterparts. Murray’s formative years were spent in a segregated North Carolina where she was among the first to integrate classrooms, courtrooms and conferences to sit alongside the world’s most influential powerbrokers. 

That gulf of injustice settled deep inside. A visionary, Pauli Murray understood that the same arguments employed to assail Jim Crow laws and other forms of racial discrimination could be made to attack gender inequity — and, consequently, these pivotal insights became a professional signature. 

Confidante to President Franklin D. Rooselevelt’s wife Eleanor and  an inspiration to the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (who cites Murray in her first Supreme Court brief regarding the Equal Protection Clause), Pauli frequently stood in close proximity to power. 

Rejected by the University of North Carolina for being Black, and arrested for refusing to move to the back of a bus, Pauli didn’t dodge conflict, even if there was no precedent or model. Yet, there’s often an excruciating price paid for being “ahead of one’s time.” 

Richly recounted in Pauli’s own voice—with archival audio drawn from intimate oral histories and interviews dating back to the 1970s — Pauli’s timely story is augmented by testimonies from a host of contemporary thinkers, educators, and present-day civil rights activists and there are many parallels to today’s ongoing struggle for racial and gender equality.

Murray’s story, artfully told, with the help of editor (pronounced syn-quay) Northern, a former Bay Area resident, and filmmakers Betty West, Julie Cohen, and Talleah Bridges. The film is showing at theaters now from Amazon Studios and releases on Prime video on October 1.

Northern is an artist, filmmaker, and editor who’s been working in documentary for over 18 years. He has edited numerous projects for PBS including “America by the Numbers” featuring Maria Hinojosa and “Your Voice Your Story.” He also spent 10 years working as a lead editor for Stanley Nelson’s Firelight Media (“Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool,” “Black Panthers”). To date, he has over a dozen short films on permanent display at The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, along with the 2021 documentary, “The One and Only Dick Gregory.”

I spoke with Cinque Northern about this absorbing retelling of Pauli Murray (b.1910-d.1985). Please see the link to a portion of our conversation below.

Download link
https://wetransfer.com/downloads/f45303a149989a34ad4a92a9d76cbf1820210927193714/a77cded8dbbca5c4c28756bea57a756620210927193714/14a142

Continue Reading

Chicago

(In)Justice for All Film Festival International Scheduled August 12-21

Free Virtual Event to Feature Films, Poets, and Panel Discussions

Published

on

7th (In)Justice for All Film Festival (IFAFF) Flyer

Chicago’s Trinity United Church of Christ, its Senior Pastor Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III, and The Next Movement (TNF) announce the 7th (In)Justice for All Film Festival (IFAFF), scheduled August 12-21. 

Because of the pandemic, this much-anticipated fest remains FREE of charge and will be virtual. This year, the IFAFF has partnered with Eventive, a well-established and respected virtual film distribution platform. 

The IFAFF brings audiences films that explore America’s criminal justice system – police, courts, and corrections – and the industries that profit from this cauldron of human misery. Stories told include those of millions of people who are relegated to second-class citizenship under an unforgiving system. Stories also highlight how other countries are successfully addressing this issue, as well as showcasing best practices right here in America.  

The virtual 7th IFAFF International will screen feature-length documentaries, feature films, and topical shorts, all with themes centered on the epidemic of mass incarceration, the criminal (in)justice system, racism and white supremacy, gun violence, police brutality, unfair housing, immigration, social unrest, and other human rights violations.  

The film festival brings additional context to the films and their messages through a variety of panel conversations as well as the inclusion of spoken word segments. It also includes a film competition for new movies and “Justice Awards” for exceptional films that best demonstrate the challenges and tragedies of our broken justice systems.

While the focus is on new films that are submitted into the competition, a variety of older films highlighting the historical perspectives of today’s challenges also are screened.  

The Next Movement (TNM) was born as a response to a 2010 visit and lecture by Professor Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, held at Trinity United Church of Christ. TNM, organized as a committee of the Trinity United Church of Christ Prison Ministry, is comprised of people of all races, ages, and religions who view mass incarceration as the key human rights issue of our time, and who are committed to building the mass movement necessary to alleviate it. 

Through education, awareness and organizing individuals and organizations, TNM is dedicated to mobilizing the “people power” necessary to make the systemic changes required. 

The 7th IFAFF International will run over a 10-day period from August 12-21. Free tickets are available by visiting www.injusticeforallff.com or https://watch.eventive.org/injusticeforallff. 

In addition to screening films, this year’s festival will include grand opening events: Spoken Word interludes featuring exciting Chicago poets, special guest speakers, panelists/panel discussions providing context to the many films to be featured over the 10 days (dealing with organizing, restorative justice, domestic violence, immigration, bail reform, racism, eviction, and, of course, mass incarceration); and closing ceremony/awards events. 

The magic of the festival derives from a committed, extensive group of partners who contribute their enthusiasm, relationships, and more to spread the news of the IFAFF International throughout Chicago and the nation. Independent film houses, universities, justice organizations, faith communities, and select media outlets comprise the bulk of IFAFF partners. 

Major 2021 IFAFF sponsors include Trinity United Church of Christ – Unashamed Media Group, Coalition to End Money Bond, and Euclid Avenue United Methodist Church. 

IFAFF website address – www.injusticeforallff.com

Eventive IFAFF website address – https://watch.eventive.org/injusticeforallff

Twitter & IG – @IFAFF

FB – @IFAFFInternational

Hashtag – #IFAFF2021

Continue Reading

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending