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Oakland Mayoral Candidates Talk Jobs

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With Oakland’s mayoral election coming up next year, one of the big questions for all candidates will be: what you are doing or will you do to create jobs in a city that has yet to deal effectively with chronic unemployment for adults and youth and is struggling to come to grips with crime and other social ills connected to extreme poverty?

Mayor Jean Quan, staking out the incumbent’s position, says that Oakland has enough development projects in the pipeline to bring prosperity to the city, speaking at a kickoff ceremony last week at the former army base – adjacent to the Port of Oakland – which will be replaced with the Oakland Global Trade and Logistics Center, a hub for transporting cargo in and out of Oakland.

“Mytop priority has always been public safety and creating opportunities for our children.

The thousands of well-paid, blue collar jobs this project will bring to our city are critical to our ongoing work to build a safer, prosperous Oakland,” said Quan.

“This is the first groundbreaking in a series of three billion-dollar, game-changing projects that will bring historic growth to Oakland’s economy,” she said. “ Oakland Global, Brooklyn Basin and Coliseum City will employ many thousands of Oakland residents with good, sustainable jobs and transform our city.”

While most observers are confident the projects will create construction jobs and some jobs operating the warehouses and other businesses that are built, what remains uncertain is how many jobs will actually be created and of those how many will go to Oakland residents.

Port Commissioner Bryan Parker, a candidate for mayor, says that developer Phil Tagami deserves credit for sticking with the Army Base project for many years while Quan also deserves some credit for her efforts.

The Army Base development “will lead to lots of jobs. It is going to be a potentially game changing thing,” said Parker, adding that the development will be generally good for the economy.

“It will put Oakland’s port in the top echelon in the country – with its rail connections, logistics center and state-of-the-art warehouses,” he said. “It will attract businesses and is something the city and the port should be proud of.”

Parker was less sure about the mayor’s claims about Brooklyn Basin (formerly Oakland to 9th), Coliseum City and building a new home for the Oakland A’s. “She does deserve some of the credit for some of the things, but some of what she says is hyperbole, not balanced with actual reality,” he added

“Under my administration, we would be thinking more carefully about how we spend government funds, focusing more on public-private partnerships,” Parker said, explaining his ideas for creating more jobs for Oakland residents.

Mayoral candidate Joe Tuman, a professor and political analyst, said he was “delighted to see the city finally get this Army Base project going,” and that some jobs will be created for Oakland residents.

However, he said, “If you’re going to claim this a game changer, it also needs to be a game changer in terms of stimulating Oakland’s economy and growing jobs.

“A good share of those permanent jobs need to go to those who are most vulnerable, who are unemployed, live in poor neighborhoods and are victims of crime,” Tuman said. “Even with all the work that’s gone into this Army Base project, is not clear to me how many jobs will be going to residents of Oakland and those in West Oakland,

“How many people who live there will get these jobs? Will they extend to people of color?” He asked.

As for Coliseum City, he said he felt the mayor was premature with her claims. “It is a great concept, and if it happens that will be wonderful. But we have to be careful not to over-claim what we have here. There are still many steps to go. It’s all very preliminary.”

The mayor’s responsibility, he said, is to provide public safety and fix the neighborhoods. “Fix the things you’re supposed to fix now. There are very serious problems in the Coliseum area that still need to be addressed.”

The city must have an aggressive jobs policy, he said, to provide support for Oakland’s long-term unemployed, young people in and out of high school who are looking for work and older workers whose age is a barrier to finding a job.

As mayor, Tuman said he would ensure that the city supports buildings trades training programs and creates supports for small contractors, which hire more Oakland residents.

“We want to make sure everyone who wants access has an opportunity,” he said. “We have to be sure our (business and trade union) partners are continuing to represent the diversity of our community.”

In the longer run, Tuman said, he will work to bring more hotels and retail businesses to Oakland, which will generate tax income and also jobs for local residents. He will also seek bring biotechnology and computer technology companies to the city.

 

City Government

Council Unanimously Approves Local Business Empowerment Ordinance

The Oakland African American Chamber of Commerce (OAACC) and Post News Group joined with District 6 Councilmember Loren Taylor to host a town hall to discuss ways to mitigate local contracting disparities.

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District 6 Councilmember Loren Taylor

The Oakland African American Chamber of Commerce (OAACC) and Post News Group joined with District 6 Councilmember Loren Taylor to host a town hall to discuss ways to mitigate local contracting disparities.

Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan, and the staff of District 3 Councilmember Carroll Fife also joined the town hall meeting to add their support for full implementation of the plan to bring a more equitable distribution of the city’s contracting dollars.

A direct response to the city’s 2017 Disparities Study, conducted by Mason Tillman Associates, showed more than $56M in lost contract dollars for the Black community during the five-year study period. The purpose of the town hall was to receive community input on potential solutions, including Taylor’s Local Business Empowerment Through Contracting (LBETC) Resolution & Ordinance.

While the resolution was passed unanimously during the Council’s meeting on January 12, questions of financial and operational impact delayed the ordinance’s second reading to this week’s council meeting. Co-sponsored by District 7 Councilmember Treva Reid, the ordinance was also unanimously approved by the councilmembers present in a 7-0 vote, following immense public support mobilized by OAACC President Cathy Adams prior to and during the council meeting.

Taylor thanked the OAACC and the many groups and individuals who urged transparent and regular public reporting of all contracts, even those that are awarded at staff’s discretion for amounts less than $50,000 without council approval.

Taylor said quick action is required because, “Our local diverse business owners are currently missing out on millions of dollars in city contracting opportunities. There is still much work to do moving forward.”

Paul Cobb, publisher of the Post, said “We will regularly publish the names and amounts of  all contracts awarded to companies and individuals. With diligent monitoring we can reverse the drain of Oakland’s tax dollars and reverse the cashflow characteristics to help create jobs for Oakland residents.”

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City Government

Community Support Needed to Ensure Progress Addressing City of Oakland Contracting Disparities

In conjunction with the Oakland African American Chamber of Commerce and the Oakland Post News Group, Taylor is hosting a virtual town hall on Saturday, February 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.During this meeting diverse business owners will hear directly from the councilmember on his proposed solutions to address the city’s current contracting disparities. This will also be an opportunity for companies to learn more about local resources available and share insight on what is still needed.

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Councilmember Loren Taylor with Black community and business Leaders demanding the city aggressively address race and gender disparities.

Over the past six weeks, The Oakland Post has run several articles on the significant disparities facing Black and women-owned businesses who pursue city contracts. We are focusing on this topic so much because the millions of dollars that should have come to the Black community are sorely needed to help improve the educational, economic, and health outcomes of our community. Legislation proposed by District 6 Councilmember Loren Taylor is intended to bring those millions of dollars back to the Black community.

As reported in 2017 Race & Gender Disparity Study, African-American companies were awarded 3.21% of the prime construction contracts and only 0.32% of total construction contract dollars. As it relates to professional services, African-American companies received 2.92% of prime contracts and 0.91% of total dollars. According to Taylor, “These numbers are particularly concerning seeing that African Americans comprise 25% of Oakland’s population.”

In conjunction with the Oakland African American Chamber of Commerce and the Oakland Post News Group, Taylor is hosting a virtual town hall on Saturday, February 13 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.During this meeting diverse business owners will hear directly from the councilmember on his proposed solutions to address the city’s current contracting disparities. This will also be an opportunity for companies to learn more about local resources available and share insight on what is still needed.

To ensure these new policies move forward, community members are invited to attend the upcoming City Council Meeting on Tuesday, February 16 at 1:30 p.m. and e-mail the City Council at council@oaklandca.gov.

Loren Taylor is the District 6 councilmember for the City of Oakland.

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City Government

As Unhoused Community’s Eviction Approaches, City Council Discusses ‘Alternative Shelter’ Options 

Residents claim over 35 people live in the park and that City representatives told them they would be cleared in the first week of February and offered shared space in the City’s Community Cabins, also known as the tuff sheds. For Edward Hansen, 65, who’s lived in the park for over seven years, was born in Oakland, and just got out of the hospital after having a stroke, accepting the space would mean sharing a room with a new person he does not live with. Hansen plans to reject the offer.

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Edward Hansen, who was born in Oakland and has lived in or near Union Point Park for 7 years, holds a painted anchor at the park. Union Point Park's homeless community is set to be evicted before February 12. Photo by Zack Haber on January 17.

At a January 12 meeting, Oakland’s City Council discussed, but did not vote upon, amendments proposed by Councilmembers Rebecca Kaplan and Nikki Fortunato Bas requesting the City offer unhoused residents extended shelter stays and individual shelter units following evictions of unhoused people during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Out of concern for possibly spreading the COVID-19 virus, Kaplan said that “people should not be made to share a room with those who they do not already live with.” A resolution, passed unanimously by Council on March 27 of last year, requested the City to only clear unhoused communities if it offered residents “individual housing units or alternative shelter,” but the Council still has not decided what “alternative shelter” means.

The delay will likely soon affect unhoused residents at Union Point Park, as the City plans to clear the park but does not yet have codified guidance from the Council as to what alternative shelter options they should offer unhoused people when they execute the clearance.

Due to a cease-and-desist order that the S.F. Bay Conservation and Development Commission has delivered to the City of Oakland, which the City has not challenged, residents living in Union Point Park must be cleared from the park by February 12.

Residents claim over 35 people live in the park and that City representatives told them they would be cleared in the first week of February and offered shared space in the City’s Community Cabins, also known as the tuff sheds. For Edward Hansen, 65, who’s lived in the park for over seven years, was born in Oakland, and just got out of the hospital after having a stroke, accepting the space would mean sharing a room with a new person he does not live with. Hansen plans to reject the offer.

“If they’re not going to physically push us with police, I’m going to stand my ground,” said Hansen. “From what I understand they have to offer us something a wee bit better than what we have now.”

After Council unanimously passed the Encampment Management Policy during an October 21 meeting, which set strict guidelines for where the City plans to focus unhoused community closures, Oakland’s City Administration proposed a resolution that defines what “alternative shelter” they plan to offer people like Hansen. The resolution allows “congregate” or grouped shelter, like homeless shelters and shared space in the Community Cabins, to be offered. It further stipulated that the shelter must be offered “no less than 72 hours prior to an encampment clearing” and for a stay “of at least two weeks.”

Advocates for homeless people found the resolution unacceptable and encouraged the public to call City Council members to encourage them to accept amendments by Kaplan and Bas’ that request “alternative shelter” be defined instead as offers of individual shelter units for a minimum of 90 day stays with 30 days prior notice.

“Do not let the current proposal of two weeks, potentially in congregate shelter, pass!,” the homeless advocacy group Housing and Dignity Village tweeted on January 11. “While permanent housing is always the goal…we need folks to receive AT LEAST 90 days in COVID safe housing options.”

Councilmember Loren Taylor and Dan Kalb both spoke in support of the extension of stays to at least 90 days with at least 30 days prior notification. But a point of contention arose over whether or not homeless shelters, where individuals would share space with strangers, should be considered “alternative shelter.” Taylor reiterated a claim that Homelessness Administrator Daryel Dunston made that there have thus far been no outbreaks in Oakland homeless shelters and that the shelters were operating at a reduced capacity. Kalb agreed and stated that shelters that do not require residents to leave during the day “maybe should be” used for the purpose of alternative shelter.

Kaplan expressed concerns that a new strain of COVID-19 that is more contagious could more easily spread in grouped shelters. The CDC’s website refers to it as B.1.1.7 and states that it has already been detected in the United States. She also reiterated concerns over how social distancing and mask regulations would be impossible in shelters.

“It’s not six feet or a mask; it’s six feet and a mask,” said Kaplan. “When you’re in an indoor room with other people where you would be needing to sleep and eat and take your mask off. That is not what the 6-foot standard refers to.”

Council did not discuss the Community Cabin Program but Kaplan and Bas’ amendments would still allow them to be used as long as people, excluding those who were already sharing a tent or a dwelling, were no longer forced to share single cabin units.

During the discussion at the meeting over the amendments, which lasted about an hour, Councilmember Noel Gallo suggested that the matter be brought to the newly formed homelessness commission to get their input before Council votes.

Taylor suggested Council address the issue on March 22, when they will consider amendments to the Encampment Management Policy. Council ended their discussion by unanimously agreeing to delay voting on the amendments, meaning that the City currently has no agreed-upon definition with Council as to what “alternative shelter” means for residents who are facing clearance.

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