Connect with us

Coronavirus

Larry Elder Fails to Make List of Candidates in Gov. Recall Race 

Elder formally launched his campaign to recall Newsom outside the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk office. 

Larry Elders/Wikimedia Commons

On July 17, California elections officials announced 41 candidates had filed the required paperwork to appear on the ballot September 14 in the election to recall and replace current California Gov. Gavin Newsom. Of those, 21 of them are running as Republicans. 

But Larry Elder, the most prominent African American vying to replace Newsom, is not on the official list of candidates, according to state officials. 

The Los Angeles-based, nationally syndicated conservative radio talk show host and newspaper columnist, who announced his candidacy for California governor July 12 will not be among those that California Secretary of State Shirley N. Weber is expected to certify next week. 

However, Ying Ma, a campaign spokesperson for Elder, said she expects Elder to be on the final list of certified candidates. 

“Our campaign submitted every document required by the Secretary of State and the Los Angeles County Registrar,” she said in a statement Saturday.

Elder is among 70-plus candidates who have announced that they are vying to unseat Newsom, including former Olympian Caitlyn (Bruce) Jenner, former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, former U.S. Congressman Doug Ose and 2018 GOP gubernatorial nominee John Cox. 

Elder formally launched his campaign to recall Newsom outside the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk office. 

“I’m running for governor because the decline of California isn’t the fault of its people,” he said. “Our government is what’s ruining the Golden State. Our schools are closed to both students and their parents. Our streets aren’t safe from rising violent crime or the disaster of rising homelessness. And the scandals of Sacramento aren’t going to stop on their own. It’s time to tell the truth. We’ve got a state to save.”

Since filing his candidacy, Elder has been using social media platforms to express his views on homelessness in California, education, and the city of Los Angeles’ mandate to wear face masks indoors, including for individuals who are fully vaccinated.

“As Gov, I will not tell, much less order, people to wear masks. I will not falsely claim that mask-wearing protects kids. The reason I wore a mask when I signed the application to run is that Newsom will not allow entry into that govt building without one,” Elder posted to his Twitter account July 14.

On July 16, he followed with another tweet, “If Gavin Newsom had sense or spine he would reverse LA’s mask order, which flies against both CA and CDC rules. He has the power to free LA residents of this madness. When I’m governor, there will be NO mask mandates at state or local level in California.”

Elder, 69, was born and raised in South Central Los Angeles. His father, who served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II, moved to California from Georgia and opened a restaurant — Elder’s Snack Bar.

Elder’s mother, who was once a clerical worker for the U.S. Department of War (now the U.S. Department of Defense), raised three boys as a stay-at-home mom.

Elder earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Brown University in Rhode Island and a Juris Doctorate from the University of Michigan School of Law. His daily radio program, “The Larry Elder Show,” is heard every weekday in all 50 states, on more than 300 stations, according to his campaign website. 

Newsom backers have blasted the recall effort as a Republican attempt to steal an election they cannot legitimately win. 

“This recall is a partisan power grab – nothing more, nothing less — a cynical attempt by national Republicans to force an election, and to try to seize control in California,” said U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, former California Secretary of State and the state’s first Latino U.S. Senator. “This Republican recall effort is powered by the same forces who still refuse to accept the results of the presidential election in 2020. They are pushing voter suppression efforts in statehouse after statehouse across the country.”

Editor-in-chief note:   On July 21, Superior Court Judge Laurie M. Earl ruled: “I don’t find that Mr. Elder was required to file tax returns at all.”  That was because the September 14 election is considered a special contest rather than a direct primary.  Elder tweeted “Victory!  My next one will be on Sept. 14 at the ballot box.”

Community

Many in Black Communities are Choosing Vaccination 

Inequities in health outcomes have always been with us. COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates among African Americans rival or exceed those in heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. Blacks sit atop most bad lists and at the bottom of most good lists. 

Published

on

Vaccination/Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock

The trail of illness and death left amid the spread of COVID-19 in Black and African American communities should come as no surprise.

Inequities in health outcomes have always been with us. COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates among African Americans rival or exceed those in heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. Blacks sit atop most bad lists and at the bottom of most good lists.

COVID-19 vaccinations offer us an opportunity to better balance the scale.

Unfortunately, even with widely available testing, highly effective vaccines, and extraordinary efforts by health departments to educate and encourage people of color to get vaccinated, many Black Californians remain skeptical.

We can only hope that the FDA’s full regulatory approval of the Pfizer vaccine on August 23 for those 16 and up convinces more to get the vaccine.  It’s worth noting that emergency-use authorization also remains in place for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson shots, as well as Pfizer’s for 12- to 15-year-olds – and that all of these vaccines are safe and effective in protecting against COVID-19 and its highly contagious variants.

Eddie Fairchild and Steph Sanders were skeptical about the COVID-19 vaccine but came to understand why vaccination benefits our entire community.

Fairchild, a Sacramento insurance agent, said he knew of research that found Black and white people are often treated differently for the same health conditions leading to poorer health outcomes.

“I was hesitant,” he said. “I was going to wait and see how it panned out with everyone else.

But when a Black friend in the health care field told him he’d opted to get vaccinated, Fairchild asked him why.

“He said, ‘Risk-reward, and the risk is death.’ At that point I didn’t have to ask him what the reward was.”

With a finance degree and a belief that numbers don’t lie, Fairchild looked at the data. He learned that until 2020 the average number of Americans who died each year was about 2.6 million, but in 2020 that figure was 3.4 million. There was only one possible explanation for the death rate surge, he said.

“COVID is absolutely real,” he said, adding that three of his cousins died from the virus. “Taking all that into consideration, I decided that it’s risky to engage in the world and not be vaccinated. It made sense for me to get it.”

Racial gaps in vaccination have thankfully narrowed in recent weeks. But as of September 1, while Black people account for 6% of the state’s population, they account for 6.6% of COVID-19 deaths, which is 11% higher than the statewide rate, according to state department of public health data. Only about 55% of Black people in California have had at least one dose of the vaccine.

Reasons for the discrepancies run the gamut, from conspiracy theories like Black people are getting a less effective vaccine than whites or that the vaccine will eventually be deadly, to challenges in health care access. 

Mostly, it’s based on a lack of trust in medical and scientific institutions, which have a long history of racism and mistreating Black people.

So even when it comes to good things like vaccines, which are scientifically proven to be good for the community, it always comes back to trust.

Sanders, a Vallejo school principal, was hesitant because of the Tuskegee syphilis studies in which Black men who had the disease were intentionally not treated with penicillin. And he was dubious that an effective vaccine could be developed so quickly. 

In fact, the science and technology enabling development of the COVID-19 vaccines was in development for a more than decade before the virus emerged in 2020. The FDA authorized three vaccines for emergency use after they underwent a rigorous process and were proven through trials to be safe and effective at preventing severe COVID-19, hospitalization, and death.

He decided to get vaccinated when his school board decided last spring to bring students back into classrooms.

Today, he’s a fervent vaccine advocate. He holds “lunch and learn” forums for educators, encouraging vaccination.

“I’m a leader and people are relying on my knowledge,” he said. “I tell them, ‘Don’t make this about you, but about the people you love and care about. It’s about protecting them.’”

There is still a long way to go before Blacks achieve true health equity, but vaccination against a virus that is taking a terrible toll on our communities is a critical step in the right direction.

 

Continue Reading

Bay Area

Castlemont High Coach Launches “Books Before Balls” Project

Tamikia McCoy, an Oakland Athletic League phenomena in 1991 – 1993, dominated girls’ basketball, becoming a walk-on at Grambling to win the Southern Western Conference of 1993-1994.  

Published

on

Tamikia McCoy/Photo Courtesy of Tanya Dennis

 

Michael Franklin

Tamikia McCoy, an Oakland Athletic League phenomena in 1991 – 1993, dominated girls’ basketball, becoming a walk-on at Grambling to win the Southern Western Conference of 1993-1994.  

For two years, she played with the Running Rebels, an Oakland all-star basketball team.  After earning many degrees, McCoy returned to her beloved Castlemont as Coach in 2019, and quickly realized a responsibility to her students beyond winning games and created Books Before Balls.

Another Castlemont alumni of that same year was not as fortunate as McCoy.  Like McCoy, Michael Franklin was a basketball beast.  He was awarded first team All-City for the Oakland Athletic League 1993-1994 and was Northern California’s All American that same year. 

Franklin continues to hold the record for scoring 43 points in one quarter in a game against McClymonds. Tragically, he was killed Dec. 14, 2016, at a gas station at 98th and Edes in Oakland.

Coach McCoy’s concerns about violence inspired her to create the Books Before Balls Project to address academic and social gaps that are working against student success. 

“For violence and bullying to cease, the underlying reasons have to be addressed,” said McCoy, “Food scarcity may seem unrelated to violence, but it’s a signal that economic opportunities are lacking, which leads to trauma and desperation.”  

McCoy is also concerned that Castlemont’s library was closed and is spearheading a campaign to reopen and revitalize the library.  

She has joined with Oakland Frontline Healers and Adamika Village#stopkillingourkids movement to address issues of food scarcity, lack of economic opportunity, lack of resources and lack of support for students entering college.  

Together, they are creating a model that is duplicatable and hopefully will be adopted at other OUSD schools. Oakland Frontline Healers are a collaborative of 30 nonprofits and doctors offering services, food, and resources to mitigate the effects of COVID-19.  

Players and families will be tested weekly by Umoja Health before games, and the COVID-19 vaccine will be available for those that wish to take it.

With a grant from the Department of Violence Prevention, Building Opportunity for Self-Sufficiency (BOSS) and Adamika Village#stopkillingourkidsmovement, are honoring Michael Franklin’s life by hosting a series of “Mike’s Knights” Basketball Tournaments at Castlemont High School beginning the last Friday in November.  

Participants will be paid stipends to participate in the league or cheer squad and will be tutored and mentored during the tournaments, which will include family forums to discuss ending violence in East Oakland.

Books Before Balls invites the community to donate to the organization to support the Lady Knights’ basketball team, the success program that funds first year college students, or join their initiative to reopen the library. 

 For more information contact:  Ladyknights2019@yahoo.com For youth interested in joining the eight-week tournament contact Adamika Village at adamikaadamika@gmail.com 

Together with school leaders and administrators, and with the support of Oakland Frontline Healers, Books Before Balls is staging a “Student’s Against Bullying” event Friday, Sept. 17 from 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. at Youth Uprising, 8711 MacArthur Blvd. in Oakland.

The Oakland Post’s coverage of local news in Alameda County is supported by the Ethnic Media Sustainability Initiative, a program created by California Black Media and Ethnic Media Services to support community newspapers across California.

Continue Reading

Community

California Eviction Protections Remain in Effect Through Sept. 30

CA COVID-19 Rent Relief Program still accepting applications

Published

on

Row of Houses, Photo Courtesy of California Black Media

AB 832, signed by Governor Gavin Newsom on June 28, extended California’s critical eviction protections through September 30, 2021, giving California the strongest eviction protections in the country. The bill also provided $5.2 billion to help struggling California renters remain housed by covering rent and utilities that date back to April 2020. 

Officials are strongly encouraging both tenants and landlords with unpaid rent to apply as soon as possible to the CA COVID-19 Rent Relief program following California’s of eviction protections. Under AB 832, the program now covers up to 100% of unpaid or future rent and may also help low-income renters pay some or all their unpaid utility bills, including gas, electric, water and internet services.   

Landlords and income-eligible renters who have been impacted by COVID-19, and have unpaid rent or utilities, or need help with future rent can apply to the CA COVID-19 Rent Relief program at HousingIsKey.com. 

The application process has been streamlined with many improvements that include increasing language access, a shorter application, and less paperwork to upload.  Applicants who have already applied for relief, including those who have already been paid for past due rent or utilities, do not need to reapply to obtain additional assistance for future support.

A notification will go out to tenants and their landlords 60 days after initial payments are received with an invitation to update their current application with additional requests for financial assistance.

Applications will be accepted on an ongoing basis until funds are exhausted, although applicants are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. Applicant information is private and won’t be shared between landlord and tenant, and applicants will not be asked about immigration status, or asked to provide proof of citizenship. 

Applicants who need assistance in another language or local assistance filling out an application or uploading paperwork can schedule an appointment with a local community organization in their area by calling 833-687-0967, or by visiting the “Get Help” tab at HousingIsKey.com.

For more information and to apply for the program, visit HousingIsKey.com or call the CA COVID-19 Rent Relief Call Center at 833-430-2122 (toll free) daily between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.

Continue Reading

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending