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AFRO Exclusive: Michael Ealy Previews ‘The Intruder’

THE AFRO — When Scott (Michael Ealy) and Annie (Meagan Good) move from the city of San Francisco to the Napa Valley wine country, they are planning to begin their lives as newlyweds and start a family.  Yet when the young Black couple settles in, the original owner of the house, Charlie Peck (Dennis Quaid), keeps popping up in the oddest and sometimes, scariest of ways, making for a new thriller that hits theaters May 3, “The Intruder.”

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By Micha Green

When Scott (Michael Ealy) and Annie (Meagan Good) move from the city of San Francisco to the Napa Valley wine country, they are planning to begin their lives as newlyweds and start a family.  Yet when the young Black couple settles in, the original owner of the house, Charlie Peck (Dennis Quaid), keeps popping up in the oddest and sometimes, scariest of ways, making for a new thriller that hits theaters May 3, “The Intruder.”

In an exclusive interview, Michael Ealy sat down with the AFRO to share how the film manages to engage audiences with a real love story, a relatable plot and scary moments, while leaving viewers with a tough question at the end, “What would I do if this happened to me?”

“Most of the prep work from this role came in terms of working with Meagan [Good] and Deon [Taylor] the director,” Ealy told the AFRO.  “We talked about trying to make this couple real. Not just this newlywed bliss fantasy. This couple has a history and we have to come to terms with what that means and whether or not it’s kind of a flaw or window of opportunity for Charlie to kind of manipulate some things and come between us.”

Through the work that Taylor, Good and Ealy put in, the romanticism, frustrations and intimate moments between Scott and Annie are believable on screen.

“We didn’t just want it to be a romanticized version of a relationship where everything is happy; everything is great.  And I think we were able to get that done.”

Their relatable romance makes it that much more engaging to watch when Quaid’s character tries to mess up their new life and relationship.

“Dennis Quaid’s character, Charlie Peck, is the sociopath in this one and I’m doing everything in my power to try and protect myself and my wife from his demented way of looking at this house and us.  And what he’s trying to do is tear us apart,” Ealy said.

How Quaid tries to ruin this family is what makes the plot incredibly interesting to watch.

A rare sight portrayed onscreen, the young, successful Black couple spends over $3 million on a home that had been owned by Quaid’s character’s family for generations.  It is a battle between Old v. New and Black People v. The White Man, but the storyline allows for even more than just a conversation on dueling themes.

“I think where we are in 2019, it’s time to start acknowledging that we’re not a monolith, and that there are characters, there are people, who aren’t in entertainment and can afford a $3 million house.  There are people who can afford a $300,000 house, and we run the full spectrum,” Ealy told the AFRO. “I think for years all we ever saw was poor Black people and that’s fine because everything had to be.  Why was “Good Times” a hit? Because we had to identify with the struggle. And the reality is at this point, that not every Black child grows up with a struggle.”

“I think with regards to Scott and Annie, they’re doing well, but as you can see in the movie, it almost doesn’t matter when you come across a sociopath like Dennis Quaid’s character, Charlie.”

Ealy emphasized the identifiable common themes and storylines within “The Intruder,” that will make the film significant and enjoyable to many audiences. “I do think the film has a universal quality that can make anyone relate to it, because everyone is trying to buy home.  Everyone. Most people try to buy a house at some point in their lives and your first house is where you can start a family. These are all tangible relationship goals, if you will.”

Besides the fact that audiences will see themselves reflected on screen, they will also be entertained.

“It’s a fun movie. It’ll make you laugh, it might make you cry, it might make you a little scared.”

Ealy said that seeing this film will bring feelings of nostalgia and, in the end, will have one questioning their own methods of dealing with crisis.

“This is like an old movie going experience.  There’s no special effects. It’s literally a movie that’s grounded in reality.  It’s like, it could be you, and I think that’s why the experience is so tangible.  That’s why the experience is so fun, because ultimately you’ll see yourselves up on that screen, questioning ‘What would I do in this situation?’”

This article originally appeared in The Afro

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Arts and Culture

Former Post Staffer Releases New Film, ‘I Thought You Knew’

With the intent of addressing LGBTQ themes as well as mental health issues and how to cope with them, Haqq Shabazz’ most recent effort, “I Thought You Knew,” follows beautiful and intelligent Lavette, who has just been released from prison after completing a two-year sentence. While inside, she succeeds on her college SATs exam, realizing her desire of going to college.

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Amir Abu Haqq Shabazz, left, with Elise Neal, an actress who has appeared in several films Haqq Shabazz has produced. Phot courtesy of Haqq Shabazz.
Amir Abu Haqq Shabazz, left, with Elise Neal, an actress who has appeared in several films Haqq Shabazz has produced. Phot courtesy of Haqq Shabazz.

IN YO FACE Filmworks recently released the film, “I Thought You Knew” on the internet and is available for viewing through IMDb.

Amir Abu Haqq Shabazz, owner of Haqq Shabazz Entertainment, and staffer for the Post News Group more than 20 years ago, has produced and/or co-produced many films with Black casts and crews.

With the intent of addressing LGBTQ themes as well as mental health issues and how to cope with them, Haqq Shabazz’ most recent effort, “I Thought You Knew,” follows beautiful and intelligent Lavette, who has just been released from prison after completing a two-year sentence. While inside, she succeeds on her college SATs exam, realizing her desire of going to college.

But things swiftly spiral out of control. To her astonishment, her terrible connection with her father re-emerges as do troubles with her psychotic best friend.

It results in a life-or-death situation.

The stars of the film are Glenn Plummer, Felicia Snoop Pearson, Marcus T. Paulk, Drag-On, Lindsey Cruz, Zaina Juliette, and Michael Monteiro.

The story concept was created by playwright and executive producer Retornzia Riser and the screenplay was written and directed by Conrad Glover.

Haqq Shabazz, Damon Jamal, and Chad Montgomery, executive producers of IN YO FACE Filmworks, led a fine team of line producers in Riser, Cleo Flucker, Anthony A.B. Butler and Emily T. Hall.

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Activism

San Rafael Elks Club Presents Documentary Film on Child Sex-Trafficking

“California’s Forgotten Children” is an award-winning, feature-length documentary directed by Melody C. Miller, and, according to the documentary’s website, exposes the commercial sexual exploitation of children in California.

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Top, movie poster. Middle from left: Withelma “T” Ortiz Walker Pettigrew, photo from www.theextraordinary.com; Carissa Phelps photo from alchetron.com; Minh Dang photo from www.globalslaveryindex.org; Leah Jonet Albright-Byrd photo from www.gannett-cdn.com, Nikolaos Al-Khadra photo from hollyaustinsmith.com; and Rachel Thomas, M. Ed., photo from www.rachelcthomas.com
Top, movie poster. Middle from left: Withelma “T” Ortiz Walker Pettigrew, photo from www.theextraordinary.com; Carissa Phelps photo from alchetron.com; Minh Dang photo from www.globalslaveryindex.org; Leah Jonet Albright-Byrd photo from www.gannett-cdn.com, Nikolaos Al-Khadra photo from hollyaustinsmith.com; and Rachel Thomas, M. Ed., photo from www.rachelcthomas.com

By Godfrey Lee

A special screening of “California’s Forgotten Children,” a film about children who were victims of sexual exploitation and human trafficking, was shown at the San Rafael Elks Lodge #1108, on Nov. 2, 2022.

A Hula dance group performed, and hamburger dinner was served prior to the screening of the film. Laurel Botsford, founding president and CEO of Wisdom International: Help2Others presented the film. Marin County District Attorney Lori Frugoli joined Botsford after the screening to answer questions concerning human trafficking.

“California’s Forgotten Children” is an award-winning, feature-length documentary directed by Melody C. Miller, and, according to the documentary’s website, exposes the commercial sexual exploitation of children in California.

Survivors shown in the documentary share their individual stories and help the viewer gain insight into this hidden world. Available online, the film can be shared with children who may also be facing such issues themselves wherever they live.

The resilient survivors featured in the film overcame the commercial sexual exploitation that they experienced as children. They are now changing the world by ensuring that no child is forgotten.

Stories from movement leaders like orator Withelma “T” Ortiz Walker Pettigrew, attorney Carissa Phelps, academic scholar Minh Dang, activist Leah Jonet Albright-Byrd, therapist Nikolaos Al-Khadra, and educator Rachel Thomas, M. Ed., were featured in the documentary.

Current statistics and perspectives on sexual exploitation from professionals in social services, law enforcement, advocates and child welfare were also shown in the film.

Through their honest, personal stories, viewers can see the real world of sex trafficking by uncovering every aspect of commercial sexual exploitation. The film presents a better understanding of this crime, and encourages people to act against the injustice, violence, and slavery, and keep children safe from behind-doors rape.

Viewers also develop empathy for the children being unjustly arrested for prostitution and learn about how to help empower survivors on their path to freedom. Hope and inspiration is found through these survivors who have overcome incredible trauma and who are now leaders in their communities.

If you suspect human trafficking or recruitment and grooming in progress, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888, or the new San Francisco Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-415-907-9911.

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#NNPA BlackPress

COMMENTARY: #OscarsBlackAF: Will Packer’s 94th Academy Awards Broadcast Delivers

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The show which has grown from 15 minutes in its first year (1929) to an average of 3 and ½ hours in recent years had some controversy when Will Packer, executive producer of Girls Trip, Think Like a Man and Ride Along, cut some categories from the broadcast in order to shorten the time, which has been blamed for low ratings in previous years. The Florida A&M University (FAMU) graduate stuck to his guns addressing the controversy head on in the opening act and moved through the program effortlessly.
The post COMMENTARY: #OscarsBlackAF: Will Packer’s 94th Academy Awards Broadcast Delivers first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

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By Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Culture and Entertainment Editor

Über producer Will Packer was tapped to produce the 94th Academy Awards ceremony and he did not disappoint with grand performances, powerful acceptance speeches and an unscripted slap seen around the world. Hosted by comedians Wanda Sykes, Amy Schumer and renowned actress Regina Hall, the Oscars were infused with African American influence and culture from the presenters to the music of Earth, Wind and Fire, Lupe Fiasco and many more during the transitions and commercial breaks. The show’s musical director was Adam Blackstone and included a super group composed of Blackstone on bass guitar, Robert Glasper on piano, Travis Barker and Sheila E. on drums. The Oscar’s orchestra was led by Baltimore’s Dontae Winslow.

Presenters included Venus and Serena Williams, Halle Bailey, Ruth E. Carter, Rosie Perez, Wesley Snipes, Jason Mamoa, Lupita Nyong’o, Tracee Ellis Ross and Tyler Perry. The ceremony opened with the radiant Williams sisters, who executive produced King Richard, announcing Beyoncé, who performed “Be Alive,” from the King Richard soundtrack, on the tennis courts in Compton, CA where the world champions trained as girls. Reminiscent of the style and look of Tobe Nwigwe’s, “Make It Home” music video, Beyonce sang her heart out surrounded by an all-white clad group of Black performers against a mint green landscape.

The show which has grown from 15 minutes in its first year (1929) to an average of 3 and ½ hours in recent years had some controversy when Packer, executive producer of Girls Trip, Think Like a Man and Ride Along, cut some categories from the broadcast in order to shorten the time, which has been blamed for low ratings in previous years. The Florida A&M University (FAMU) graduate stuck to his guns addressing the controversy head on in the opening act and moved through the program effortlessly.

Ariana DeBose kicked off the ceremony with a Best Supporting Actress win for her performance as Anita in Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story. DeBose thanked Rita Moreno, who originated the role of Anita in 1962’s West Side Story, becoming the first Puerto Rican actress to win a Best Supporting Actress award. DeBose thanked Rita Moreno for opening the doors for other “Anitas like he”r and referred to herself as an openly Queer Afro-Latina, of which she is the first to win an Academy Award. She encouraged young people struggling with their identities to persevere and know that “there is a place for them here.”

Celebrated actor John Leguizamo introduced the song, “We Don’t Talk About Bruno,” from Disney’s Encanto soundtrack. Even though the song has become the highest charted Disney song in the last 28 years, Lin-Manuel Miranda opted to submit “Dos Oruguitas,” for Oscar consideration instead. Miranda, who was scheduled to appear, had to pull out of the broadcast after his wife tested positive for Covid-19. “We Don’t Talk About Bruno,” was performed by the Encanto cast Stephanie Beatriz (Brooklyn Nine-Nine), Diane Guerrero (Doom Patrol), reggaeton singer Adassa, Colombian musicians Carolina Gaitán and Mauro Castillo and Grammy award-winning rapper Megan the Stallion. John Leguizano, who actually voices the character of Bruno Madrigal in the film, did not perform, which he joked about during the introduction.

Amir “Questlove” Thompson won for Best Documentary feature for his film Summer of Soul. Thompson, who was accompanied by his mother, was overwhelmed by the win offering that the film covers the Summer of 1969 in Harlem but is relevant to what is happening today.

Comedian Chris Rock introduced the documentary category and made jokes about Denzel Washington’s performance in The Tragedy of MacBeth, at which the two-time Oscar winner laughed and congratulated Jada Pinkett Smith for her role in G.I. Jane 2. Will Smith, who later won the Best Actor award for his performance as Richard Williams in King Richard, approached Rock and slapped him in the face and returned to his seat. American television muted the sound after Smith shouted to Rock to “keep his wife’s name out of your mouth.” Lupita Nyong’o sat stunned at what many thought was a comedic bit but soon realized was a real slap.

Sean “Diddy” Combs tried to calm the situation down following the smack. Upon winning the Best Actor award, Smith wept as he spoke of protecting his family of actors and producers as well as his wife. He spoke about being bullied and forced to take poor treatment due to his celebrity. He apologized to the Academy and his fellow nominees but not to Rock. With his win, Smith becomes the fifth Black man to win the Best Actor Oscar in the history of the Academy Awards.

Additional awards were given out earlier. Late last week (March 25), the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences awarded legendary actor Samuel L. Jackson, 73, an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement in film and humanitarian efforts. Jackson, a prolific actor who has 197 acting credits, has delivered powerful performances in a host of films including Jungle Fever, Django, A Time to Kill, Eve’s Bayou, The Red Violin and the Star Wars and Marvel Universe franchises. One of Jackson’s most memorable performances was as Jules Winfield in Quentin Tarantino’s classic film Pulp Fiction, for which he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor at the 1995 Academy Awards. In his acceptance speech for the honorary Oscar, Jackson said, “I’m really, really proud to receive this statuette,” and “this thing is going to be cherished.” The Morehouse graduate also thanked “every person who has ever bought a ticket to any movie I was in.”

At the same event, Iconic actor Danny Glover, 74, received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for his human rights activism that has spanned the globe during the course of his career. Glover who is best known for his starring roles in The Color Purple, the Lethal Weapon franchise and critically acclaimed performances in The Color Purple, To Sleep With Anger, Places in the Heart, Freedom Song and The Last Black Man in San Francisco has been engaged in civic activism and used his platform to shed light on many causes including ending Apartheid in South Africa. Glover’s activism began in the Haight Asbury neighborhood of his hometown San Francisco, where he was a part of the Black Panther’s Breakfast program and a student activist at San Francisco State University.

In 1988, Glover was appointed Goodwill ambassador to the UN Development Program and an ambassador for the UNICEF division in 2004, respectively. In those capacities, Glover worked with countries in Haiti, Mali, Namibia, Senegal, Jamaica and Columbia on causes including social justice, climate change and HIV/AIDS awareness. In 2005, he combined his love for acting and filmmaking with activism and co-founded Louverture Films in New York City. The production company is dedicated to producing independent films of historical relevance, social purpose, commercial value and artistic integrity. Since its inception, the company has produced nearly 30 films on topics such as Hurricane Katrina, post-conflict resolution in Nepal, and a film about Afghanistan.

The film Coda was the big winner of the night, winning three top categories: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Picture and Troy Kotsur for Best Supporting Actor.

For a complete list of 2022 Oscar winners, click here.

This post was written by Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., founder & editor-in-chief of The Burton Wire. Follow Nsenga on Instagram or Twitter @Ntellectual or @TheBurtonWire.

The post COMMENTARY: #OscarsBlackAF: Will Packer’s 94th Academy Awards Broadcast Delivers first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

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