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African Americans Account for a Greater Share of Biden’s Voters than Biden’s Assistant and Under Secretary Nominees

However, President Biden’s nominees for these positions exceed the Black share of all of those who were nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate in 2009 (9 percent).

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Photo Courtesy of Arnaud Jaegers via Unsplash

The Joint Center’s Black Talent Initiative released a report card this week analyzing how President Biden is faring in nominating African Americans to Assistant Secretary and Under Secretary positions that require Senate confirmation.

The analysis found that while Black Americans accounted for 22 percent of Americans who voted for Biden in the 2020 general election, Black Americans accounted for only 16 percent of Biden’s Assistant Secretary nominees and 13 percent of his Under Secretary nominees.

However, President Biden’s nominees for these positions exceed the Black share of all of those who were nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate in 2009 (9 percent).

“Black voters helped elect President Biden and flipped the Senate by electing Senators Ossoff and Warnock in Georgia. Black Americans account for a tiny fraction of nominees in Republican Administrations, and Democratic Administrations that aspire to Black appointments of just over 13 percent are complicit in ensuring that Black Americans will continue to be underrepresented over time,” said Joint Center President Spencer Overton.

“Black Americans must be fairly represented among Assistant Secretary and Under Secretary positions. While we appreciate President Biden’s gains over previous Administrations in appointments, we urge him to nominate more top Black policy leaders to critical leadership positions so that Black communities are adequately represented,” said Overton.

The Biden Administration still has an opportunity to improve Black representation among its Assistant Secretary and Under Secretary positions, as it has announced nominees for only about half of these positions.

While many focus on the diversity of high-profile cabinet positions, Assistant Secretaries and Under Secretaries lead major offices and enjoy significant influence over creating and implementing policy, as well as in hiring, managing, and promoting other political appointees.

Assistant Secretaries and Under Secretaries are also important pipeline positions because they can serve as stepping stones to higher positions in the future.

Read the entire report card at https://jointcenter.org/report-card-on-biden-administration-black-assistant-secretary-and-under-secretary-nominations/

Digital Issues

Oakland Post: September 15th – September 21st, 2021

The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post for the week of September 15th – September 21st, 2021.

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The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post for the week of September 15th - September 21st, 2021.

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Activism

East Oakland Community Clean-up

The office of Councilmember Treva Reid invites you to…

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Oakland Clean Up Flyer

The Oakland Post’s coverage of local news in Alameda County is supported by the Ethnic Media Sustainability Initiative, a program created by California Black Media and Ethnic Media Services to support community newspapers across California.

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Sept. 11, 2001, 20 years later: ‘Remembrance’ held aboard the USS Hornet Sea, Space & Air Museum

The USS Hornet Sea, Space & Air Museum, moored at the City of Alameda, hosted a “Remembrance” ceremony of the events of Sept. 11, 2001, on board the ship on the 20th anniversary, Sept. 11, 2021.

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U.S. Marine Corps Honor Guard, 23rd Marine Regiment: Sgt. Tristan Garivay, Sgt. Michael Her, Cpl. Adrian Chavez and Cpl. Quentavious Leeks. Photo by Russell Moore, USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum, Community Events & Outreach

Quintin Jones, Colonel, USMC, Commanding Officer, 23rd Marine Regiment. Photo by Russell Moore, USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum, Community Events & Outreach

The USS Hornet Sea, Space & Air Museum, moored at the City of Alameda, hosted a “Remembrance” ceremony of the events of Sept. 11, 2001, on board the ship on the 20th anniversary, Sept. 11, 2021.

The ceremony recognized the impact and consequences of the series of airline hijackings and suicide attacks committed on 2001 by 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al-Queda against targets in New York City and Wash., D.C. Nearly 3,000 people died that day and 6,000 were injured.  This was the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil in U.S. history. 

The ceremony aboard the USS Hornet began with the presentation of the colors by the U.S. Marine Corps Honor Guard, 23rd Marine Regiment. (Pictured above.)

Leon Watkins, co-founder of The Walking Ghosts of Black History, was the Master of Ceremonies. He spoke about the extensive death and destruction which triggered the enormous U.S. effort to combat terrorism.

Daniel Costin, a special agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, spoke of the lasting impact of 9/11 terrorists attack on first responders. He recounted incidents where first responders rushed into the scenes of the attacks, many at the sacrifice of their own lives. More than 400 police officers and firefighters were killed that day: 343 members of the New York City Fire Department and 71 members of their law enforcement agencies.

Quintin Jones, Colonel, USMC, commanding officer of the 23rd Marine Regiment, spoke about the recovery efforts at the Pentagon following the terrorists’ attack where 125 people perished. He reflected on the actions of three first responders who recovered the U.S. Marine Corps flag from the commandant of the Marine Corps’ office at the Pentagon. This flag was still standing after the attack. It was a symbol of America’s resolve.

At the end of the formal presentations, the Marine Corps Wreath Bearers went to the fantail of the Hornet. After the playing of ‘Taps,’ they tossed a wreath into the San Francisco Bay to give final honors.

The Oakland Post’s coverage of local news in Alameda County is supported by the Ethnic Media Sustainability Initiative, a program created by California Black Media and Ethnic Media Services to support community newspapers across California.

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