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WADA: Armstrong’s Attempt at Reduced Ban ‘Almost Too Late’ 

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In this Feb. 28, 2011, file photo, Lance Armstrong is shown during a news conference at the Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. A person with knowledge of the meeting tells The Associated Press that cyclist Lance Armstrong talked last week with the head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in hopes of potentially reducing his lifetime ban. Armstrong and Travis Tygart met for six hours, according to the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the discussion was meant to remain private. The meeting was first reported by The New York Times.(AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

In this Feb. 28, 2011, file photo, Lance Armstrong is shown during a news conference at the Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. A person with knowledge of the meeting tells The Associated Press that cyclist Lance Armstrong talked last week with the head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in hopes of potentially reducing his lifetime ban. Armstrong and Travis Tygart met for six hours, according to the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the discussion was meant to remain private. The meeting was first reported by The New York Times.(AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)


SAMUEL PETREQUIN, AP Sports Writer

LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Lance Armstrong has not done enough to get his life ban reduced and his latest bid for rehabilitation is coming too late, the director general of the World Anti-Doping Agency said Tuesday.

In an interview with The Associated Press, David Howman said the disgraced American cyclist did not seize the opportunities he had to come forward with the details of his doping past.

“If he satisfied the criteria to go forward and ask for suspension of his ban, the criteria will be carefully looked at, but so far he has not,” Howman said on the sidelines of a WADA symposium in Lausanne. “There is no consideration being given to it.”

Armstrong met with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency chief Travis Tygart this month in hopes of getting a reduction of his ban but has yet to get in touch with WADA. The meeting with Tygart was the first since 2012, the year Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life after systematic doping within his former teams was exposed.

Armstrong made a public confession about his doping but WADA was expecting him to give a comprehensive account of his cheating.

“I’m not sure why he has not done anything,” Howman said. “He certainly had plenty of opportunities, including talking to us, but he has not come forward with substantial information that might be helpful to the cycling fraternity.”

Armstrong previously met twice with European officials investigating doping in cycling as part of the Cycling Independent Reform Commission hearings. The report pointed out that he was the only rider banned for life in 2012 by USADA while former teammates who testified against him were banned for just six months.

The report also noted that Armstrong deserved a “harsh sanction,” and that some reduced penalties could be justified for riders who cooperated with USADA’s initial investigation, which Armstrong did not.

Armstrong has complained of receiving unfair treatment in his campaign for his lifetime suspension to be overturned. The ban also covers sanctioned triathlons and marathons, Armstrong’s other favorite sports.

“If he had been given a harsher treatment, then one would have expected an appeal. There was no appeal,” Howman said. “Everybody would hope that he would sit down and explain the whole regime and what they did. He had that chance.

“He did not do it before the independent commission that was established by the UCI. He did not do it with USAD. He has not done it with us. It’s almost too late.”

Armstrong declined to comment.

Howman also agreed with UCI president Brian Cookson that Armstrong’s plans to ride part of the Tour de France route a day before the professional peloton this summer would be disrespectful.

Armstrong, who overcame testicular cancer, was approached to join the ride by former English soccer player Geoff Thomas, who is trying to raise $1.5 million for the fight against blood cancer.

“Mr. Cookson is the correct judge of that, and I think his statement reflected what was probably the position from their perspective, which is damaging,” Howman said. “I think there is probably going more attention on what he is doing than on the Tour, and that’s a little bit sad.”

Betsy Andreu, the wife of former Armstrong teammate Frankie Andreu who testified that he admitted to doctors treating him for cancer in 1996 that he had used performance-enhancing drugs, said Armstrong should act genuinely instead of trying to get his ban reduced out of personal interest.

“Not being able to compete for just two years is driving him nuts,” she told the AP. “So now he wants to give the impression that he is really, really sorry. Maybe he’ll do the right thing, but I don’t think he is remorseful. I think he is full of revenge. If he talks, it’s not because he wants to do good for the sport, but he wants to get back at everybody who let him take the heat himself.”

Betsy Andreu added that Armstrong’s planned return to France this summer was not a good idea.

“I think he’s so afraid of not being talked about. He is so afraid of becoming irrelevant,” she said. “So I look forward to the day when he says he is going to do something people just said: ‘OK, whatever.'”

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Bay Area

Planning Commission to Hold Public Hearing on Oakland A’s Real Estate Project

The Planning Commission will consider whether the Final EIR was completed in compliance with state law, represents the independent analysis of the city, and provides adequate information to decision-makers and the public on the potential adverse environmental effects of the proposed project, as well as ways in which those effects might be mitigated or avoided.

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By Post Staff

The Oakland Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) on the Oakland A’s Stadium and Real Estate Development. It will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m., according to a city media release.

“During the hearing, the Planning Commission will consider whether the Final EIR was completed in compliance with state law, represents the independent analysis of the city, and provides adequate information to decision-makers and the public on the potential adverse environmental effects of the proposed project, as well as ways in which those effects might be mitigated or avoided” according to the media release.

The 3,500-page report was released the week before Christmas 2021, leaving little time for community advocates to read and critique the report.

After the commission makes a recommendation, the Oakland City Council will consider certification of the Final EIR, likely in February. A “yes” vote by the council does not mean the project is approved but is a major first step toward approval.

Community advocates are asking the commission to postpone the meeting, so that the community has time to read and analyze the 3,500-page report in time to provide public comment. You can contact the commission at drarmstrong@oaklandca.gov or cpayne@oaklandca.gov.

The following are Planning Commission members:

• Clark Manus, Chair

• Jonathan Fearn, Vice-Chair

• Sahar Shiraz

• Tom Limon

• Vince Sugrue

• Jennifer Renk

• Leopold A Ray-Lynch

To read the Final EIR, go to:  https://bit.ly/32KZ3pT

 

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Black History

Oakland Natives’ We Ball Sports and HBCU’s League Pass to Deliver Negro League Apparel

With the mission of bridging HBCU baseball with its historic Negro Baseball League roots, We Ball Sports, headquartered in Atlanta, will design integrated apparel, and distribute via HBCU League Pass news, sports, shopping, and entertainment network based in Roanoke, Texas.

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Nehemiah Mitchell and Derrion Herring, co-founders of We Ball Sports.
Nehemiah Mitchell and Derrion Herring, co-founders of We Ball Sports.

By Carla Thomas

E-commerce company We Ball Sports, specializing in high-quality football gear and apparel, announced a new retail partnership with Urban Edge Networks, owner of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) League Pass.

With the mission of bridging HBCU baseball with its historic Negro Baseball League roots, We Ball Sports, headquartered in Atlanta, will design integrated apparel, and distribute via HBCU League Pass news, sports, shopping, and entertainment network based in Roanoke, Texas.

Just in time for baseball season, Nehemiah Mitchell, a co-founder of We Ball Sports, says the new partnership is the perfect blend of technology and fashion that invokes awareness and pride in African American culture.

“This is a significant partnership for us that has grown from the community we’ve built and the trust we’ve earned from athletes nationwide,” said Mitchell. “HBCU League Pass enables us to bring both of our communities together to further our reach and foster relationships between young athletes and the HBCU community.”

According to Mitchell, a native of Oakland, Weballsports.com, is the most visited, privately-owned e-commerce football equipment business globally, achieving 500,000 visitors by the end of July 2021. “This year we expect $1.5 million in sales by the end of December and 2022 should yield up to $5 million in sales,” said Mitchell.

“Nehemiah Mitchell, Brendan Royal, and Darreon Herring have their fingers on the pulse of Gen-Z and cultural trends,” said Hardy Pelt, chief financial officer at Urban Edge Networks which owns HBCU League Pass. “Their amazing growth over the past couple of years and genuine relationship with the youth sports community made them an easy selection and the perfect partner to support HBCU baseball.”

Urban Edge Networks, the owners of HBCU League Pass and entertainment network company in Las Vegas, vow to continue promoting the legacy of African Americans’ contributions to the sport of baseball through collaboration with the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, and with various HBCU baseball teams.

We Ball Sports co-founders Royal, DaHerring, and Mitchell, all former D1 football players under 30, are thrilled to partner with HBCU League Pass.

They hope to accelerate the brand’s growth by branching out into other sports and providing additional apparel and equipment in their catalog. The company also plans to partner with NFL athletes while increasing their philanthropic activities in the community.

“We plan to generate even more interest and investment into HBCU sports from professional athletes and entertainers similar to NBA point guard Stephen Curry’s agreement to fund Howard University’s golf program for six years,” said Mitchell. “Also, Deon Sanders and Percy ‘Master P’ Miller, both retired professional athletes, are also encouraging nationally ranked high school players to attend HBCUs and join their athletic programs.”

For more information visit: http://www.weballsports.com and http://www.hbculeaguepass.com.

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Bay Area

IN MEMORIAM: John Madden, Oakland Raiders Super Bowl Winning Coach, Dies at 85

“We all know him as the Hall of Fame coach of the Oakland Raiders and broadcaster who worked for every major network, but more than anything, he was a devoted husband, father and grandfather,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said.

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John Madden.
John Madden.

By Bay City News

John Madden, who won a Super Bowl with the Oakland Raiders and went on to be a television commentator and namesake of a popular football video game series, has died at the age of 85, the National Football League announced on Dec. 28, 2021.

No other information about a cause of death was immediately released.

Madden, who grew up in Daly City, led the Oakland Raiders to a Super Bowl victory in 1977, then went on to highly successful careers in TV and video games, and was recently the subject of a documentary titled “All Madden.”

“We all know him as the Hall of Fame coach of the Oakland Raiders and broadcaster who worked for every major network, but more than anything, he was a devoted husband, father and grandfather,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said.

Madden’s death prompted widespread reactions on social media from those who knew or admired him.

The Raiders, who have since moved to Las Vegas, wrote “A brilliant coach. A loyal and trusted friend. A Raider.”

Gov. Gavin Newsom wrote, “Tonight we mourn John Madden — he redefined the role of a sports broadcaster — his voice as recognizable as anyone who ever did the job. He hoisted a Super Bowl trophy with CA’s own Oakland Raiders. Our thoughts are with his family as we mourn this incredible man.”

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf wrote, “I join all in mourning + honoring SuperBowl-winning coach John Madden. He was a great personality who truly loved #Oakland. When his grandson played at O’Dowd, John was as enthusiastic about the Dragons as any NFL team. We will miss him!”

San Mateo County Board of Supervisors president David Canepa wrote, “RIP John Madden. A 1954 graduate of Jefferson High School in Daly City and Super Bowl winning coach for the Oakland Raiders. He did so much for Daly City!”

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