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This City Could Become The Next Detroit

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Valerie Jean of Detroit addresses a panel during a United Nations Fact-Finding Detroit Town Hall Meeting, Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at Wayne County Community College in Detroit.  Jean, who says she lives on the north end of the city, talks about her recent experience with the city's attempts to turn her water services off.  (AP Photo/Detroit News, Jose Juarez)

Valerie Jean of Detroit addresses a panel during a United Nations Fact-Finding Detroit Town Hall Meeting, Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at Wayne County Community College in Detroit. Jean, who says she lives on the north end of the city, talks about her recent experience with the city’s attempts to turn her water services off. (AP Photo/Detroit News, Jose Juarez)

Carl Gibson, THINK PROGRESS

 

BALTIMORE, Md. (ThinkProgress.com)—Starting this week, 25,000 households in Baltimore will suddenly lose their access to water for owing bills of $250 or more, with very little notice given and no public hearings.

Rita, a renter in Southeast Baltimore who asked to remain anonymous for this story in order to protect her two children from being taken away, told ThinkProgress she was served with a shutoff notice last week. Maryland law states that a child that is “neglected” may be taken out of his or her home and put into foster care. One characteristic of “neglect” as defined by the Maryland Department of Human Resources is a child with “consistently poor hygiene” that is “un-bathed, [having] unwashed or matted hair, noticeable body odor.”

“I love my kids, and I’d do anything for them,” Rita told ThinkProgress. “But if I turn on the shower or the sink and there’s no water, how can I give them a bath?”

Food and Water Watch researcher Mary Grant explained that making water unavailable to residents is a major health risk, and that if Baltimore were to deprive 25,000 households of water, diseases would have a high chance of propagating throughout densely-populated neighborhoods.

 

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National

This City Could Become The Next Detroit

Avatar

Published

on

Valerie Jean of Detroit addresses a panel during a United Nations Fact-Finding Detroit Town Hall Meeting, Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at Wayne County Community College in Detroit.  Jean, who says she lives on the north end of the city, talks about her recent experience with the city's attempts to turn her water services off.  (AP Photo/Detroit News, Jose Juarez)

Valerie Jean of Detroit addresses a panel during a United Nations Fact-Finding Detroit Town Hall Meeting, Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at Wayne County Community College in Detroit. Jean, who says she lives on the north end of the city, talks about her recent experience with the city’s attempts to turn her water services off. (AP Photo/Detroit News, Jose Juarez)

Carl Gibson, THINK PROGRESS

 

BALTIMORE, Md. (ThinkProgress.com)—Starting this week, 25,000 households in Baltimore will suddenly lose their access to water for owing bills of $250 or more, with very little notice given and no public hearings.

Rita, a renter in Southeast Baltimore who asked to remain anonymous for this story in order to protect her two children from being taken away, told ThinkProgress she was served with a shutoff notice last week. Maryland law states that a child that is “neglected” may be taken out of his or her home and put into foster care. One characteristic of “neglect” as defined by the Maryland Department of Human Resources is a child with “consistently poor hygiene” that is “un-bathed, [having] unwashed or matted hair, noticeable body odor.”

“I love my kids, and I’d do anything for them,” Rita told ThinkProgress. “But if I turn on the shower or the sink and there’s no water, how can I give them a bath?”

Food and Water Watch researcher Mary Grant explained that making water unavailable to residents is a major health risk, and that if Baltimore were to deprive 25,000 households of water, diseases would have a high chance of propagating throughout densely-populated neighborhoods.

 

READ MORE

###

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East Oakland Organizer Needed

The East Oakland Stadium Alliance (EOSA) is seeking an Oakland-based grassroots organizer for a short-term engagement to help grow and mobilize our coalition! Comprised of local businesses, workers, labor organizations, and community members, we are deeply concerned about the Oakland A’s proposal to leave the Coliseum site in East Oakland and build a new stadium at the port. An ideal candidate has on-the-ground campaign field experience, a strong awareness of Oakland and Alameda County political figures, and deep ties to East and West Oakland communities. Being a local resident of Oakland is a plus.

Employment with EOSA is a part-time role and will last for a minimum of four months with an opportunity to extend longer. Transportation and cell phone use would be reimbursed and candidates of color are strongly encouraged to apply.

If interested, please send a cover letter and resume to Emily Penrod, emily.penrod@deweysquare.com. For more info about EOSA, visit our website and check us out on Twitter @AllianceOakland.

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