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Richest Fight Ever is Also a Gold Mine for Vegas Bookies

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Floyd Mayweather Jr. speaks with the media during a news conference Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Las Vegas. Mayweather will face Manny Pacquiao in a welterweight boxing match in Las Vegas on May 2. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Floyd Mayweather Jr. speaks with the media during a news conference Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Las Vegas. Mayweather will face Manny Pacquiao in a welterweight boxing match in Las Vegas on May 2. (AP Photo/John Locher)

TIM DAHLBERG, AP Boxing Writer

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Days before the fight, one Manny Pacquiao believer had already put $500,000 on his man in the MGM Grand sports book.

Now, book operator Jay Rood is working hard to balance the action.

“Hopefully by this evening we’ll have taken a million-dollar bet on Mayweather,” Rood said Thursday. “We’re trying to get that hooked up now.”

Big bets and big fights are nothing new in this gambling city. But the richest fight ever is also drawing more money at the betting window than any fight before it.

“The handle on the Strip will be astronomical,” Rood said. “It will easily become the biggest fight in Nevada books. I think it could fall somewhere between $60-80 million.”

Pacquiao fans have led the way, betting their fighter early and often in most of the city’s legal sports books. The influx of money on the underdog has caused odds to drop to less than 2-1 in most books, though some larger Mayweather bets have kept them from falling even more.

Bookies say they expect the betting to rival that of some Super Bowls, fueling a weekend at the sports books like no other as bettors line up to be the fight, the Kentucky Derby and the NBA and NHL playoffs.

“It’s amazing. I’ve never seen so much action so early on a fight,” said Johnny Avello, who runs the book at the Wynn resort. “Going back two and a half months this has generated business every day and we haven’t even gotten to fight day yet.”

Oddsmakers say the betting public is infatuated with Pacquiao, partly because they like the Filipino fighter and partly because he offers more value as a plus-170 underdog. At the William Hill chain in Las Vegas, four out of every five tickets have been on Pacquiao to win the fight, and the ratio is even more lopsided at some local casinos.

A lot of the bigger tickets, though, are on Mayweather, including the bettor who was negotiating for the $1 million bet at the MGM Grand, just down the hall from the fight arena.

A day earlier, Rood said the book took over $1 million in total bets on the fight, with 60 percent of them on Pacquiao.

“It’s great value for either fighter,” he said. “We haven’t seen two-way action like this in a long time on a big fight.”

At the South Point hotel off the Las Vegas Strip, oddsmaker Jimmy Vaccaro said he had never seen betting on a fight like this in a career that stretches over nearly four decades.

Vaccaro said Pacquiao bets outnumber Mayweather wagers 5-1 at his book, with the fight tracking to do Super Bowl numbers.

“Strip away the props (proposition bets) from the Super Bowl and Pacquiao versus Mayweather is going against Seattle and New England,” he said. “I think for the state it will be about $70 million just on this fight.”

Jay Kornegay of the Westgate LV Superbook said he will take more large wagers — both five and six figures — on the fight than he did on the Super Bowl.

“Most of the tickets are on Pacquiao but the bigger money will come in on Mayweather,” Kornegay said. “The line itself is very attractive not only to the average Joe but also for the deep pockets out there not afraid to lay two dollars on Mayweather because he’s not normally that short of a price.”

One of the more popular bets at most books has been on the fight ending up a draw, largely because conspiracy theorists believe it would lead to a lucrative rematch.

A draw for a typical fight might start at 30-1, but Rood said he put this fight out at 22-1 because he expected more money on a draw. But the volume of money has been so heavy on a draw that the line is now 6-1.

“The draw is the land mine for us right now,” Rood said. “It should be higher but our risk on it now is considerable.”

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Black History

Sheryl Swoopes, The Little Dribbler

Raised by her mother in Brownsville, Texas, young Sheryl Swoopes played basketball with her three older brothers. By age seven, she was competing in a local kid’s league, the Little Dribblers. It was her siblings, she said, that helped her hone her game. “At first, they didn’t like playing with me,” she told the Los Angeles Times. “Then when they did, they wouldn’t play hard. But eventually one brother, James, played ball at Murray State. He’s 6-4. He wouldn’t play hard until he saw how good I was getting, when I beat him a couple of times.”

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WNBA All-Star and AAU alum Sheryl Swoopes.
WNBA All-Star and AAU alum Sheryl Swoopes.

By Tamara Shiloh

In April 1996, women’s basketball announced: “We Got Next.”

The WNBA was approved by the NBA Board of Governors, and games would begin the following year. The inaugural season proved successful as more than 50 million viewers watched the games.

Six months after the announcement, the league signed its first player, Sheryl Denise Swoopes (b. 1971–). In 1997, she was recruited for the Houston Comets. The signing of the contract had been long anticipated, far from the days when a girl turning pro seemed an impossible dream.

Raised by her mother in Brownsville, Texas, young Sheryl played basketball with her three older brothers. By age seven, she was competing in a local kid’s league, the Little Dribblers. It was her siblings, she said, that helped her hone her game.

“At first, they didn’t like playing with me,” she told the Los Angeles Times. “Then when they did, they wouldn’t play hard. But eventually one brother, James, played ball at Murray State. He’s 6-4. He wouldn’t play hard until he saw how good I was getting, when I beat him a couple of times.”

Over time, competing with her brothers increased her confidence, making her eager to test her skills on the blacktop. Swoopes made the basketball team at Brownfield High School, where she developed into an All-State and All-American high school player.

“It helps to play with the guys,” she told the Washington Post. “They’re so much more physical than girls are. Once you go out and you play with guys, and you get in a situation with girls, you think, ‘Well, if I scored on that guy, I know I can score on her.’”

Six feet tall by high school graduation, Swoops stood among the most popular college recruits. Her choice: University of Texas at Austin. It was the only school she seriously considered, yet she’d never given the 400-mile distance much thought.

“It was a big national basketball power, and I thought they could take my game to another level. But once I got there … well, I just didn’t realize how far it was from home,” she said. Homesick, after four days she returned home, relinquishing her full scholarship.

Determined to take her game to another level, Swoops ignored the naysayers predicting her career was already over. She enrolled in South Plains Junior College in Levelland, Texas. There, after her second season, she was named National Junior College Player of the Year. Basketball, going forward, was an uphill climb.

In 1993, Swoopes won the NCAA women’s basketball championship with the Texas Tech Lady Raiders. She has won three Olympic gold medals, an NCAA Championship, and a WNBA title. She was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2016. In 2017, she was inducted into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame.

Share Swoopes’ story about the game with your young daughter. Read “Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women’s Basketball,” by Pamela Grundy and Susan Shackelford.

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Bay Area

Councilmember Carroll Fife: Let Voters Decide If They Want to Spend Public Money for New Ballpark and Real Estate Project

Councilmember Carroll Fife said that putting the Oakland A’s $12-billion real estate development project on the ballot would ensure that the public has a voice in the project and to discuss whether public funds should be used to pay for it. “What I find to be lacking in some of the decisions that are made by people who have a position of power is the lack of input from the community,” she said. At present, she said, “Nobody is talking to District 3 residents or businesses about what they want to see in the area.”

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Councilmember Carroll Fife
Councilmember Carroll Fife

By Ken Epstein

Councilmember Carroll Fife is considering a proposal to let Oakland voters decide in November whether to approve the Oakland A’s $12-billion real estate development on public land at the Port of Oakland, which would take the final decision on the project out of the hands of City Council members, who are under intense, behind-the-scenes pressure from the project’s powerful backers.

“I’m working on spelling out the details this week. The voters should decide,” Fife said in an interview with the Oakland Post. Fife, who first announced the proposal at a town hall meeting last weekend, represents District 3 where the new A’s stadium and real estate complex would be built.

According to observers, the City Council is under pressure from A’s owner, billionaire John Fisher, as well as powerful state Democratic politicians and the building trades unions to settle the deal in the next few months, even before all the evaluations of the site, potential costs and community benefits are discussed and approved.

The amount of public funds the A’s is seeking is estimated at more than $1 billion, including onsite infrastructure, offsite infrastructure, community benefits and other expenses.

Fife said that putting the project on the ballot would ensure that the public has a voice in the project and to discuss whether public funds should be used to pay for it. “What I find to be lacking in some of the decisions that are made by people who have a position of power is the lack of input from the community,” she said. At present, she said, “Nobody is talking to District 3 residents or businesses about what they want to see in the area.”

“This is about responding to what I’m hearing from my constituents. I have to do what I think is right,” she said. “It’s interesting to hear some people speaking in opposition to a democratic process.”

A measure could be placed on the November ballot either by a vote of the City Council or community members if they collect sufficient signatures.

Opposing the proposed ballot measure, Mayor Libby Schaaf quickly published a video statement Tuesday on Twitter, based on an interview she gave to ABC7.

An outspoken backer of the real estate deal, Schaaf said the ballot proposal came as a surprise to her.

“It is not a good idea,” she said. “It is the responsibility of the council members, who are paid to work full time, who have full-time expert staff, who have access to expert consultants, to make these very complicated, technical and long lasting decisions.”

Besides implying that the decision was too complicated for local voters to understand, she emphasized that a ballot measure would be too costly, though she is already putting together almost $500 million in public funds to build infrastructure to support the Port real estate project.

“To put this on the ballot would be a waste of taxpayer dollars. It costs more than $1 million to place any item on the ballot…to ask a question, (though) polling has already shown there is wide support for keeping the A’s in Oakland (and) for a waterfront ballpark…I don’t need to put that on a ballot measure.”

Though she says a vote is not necessary, the City of Oakland has a history of taking large, long-term funding measures to voters. Since 2010, Oakland voters have voted on more than a dozen ballot measures that direct hundreds of millions of dollars in public funds for a variety of projects.

In her statements, Schaaf also tends to minimize results of polls that show deep community concerns about the costs to the public and negative impacts of the development on the Port and the city. In addition, the mayor ignores the voices of the ILWU, the longshore union that fears the project would eliminate waterfront workers’ jobs, as well as Port of Oakland businesses that say the project would jeopardize global transportation.

Oakland A’s President Dave Kaval, who still holds a possible team move to Las Vegas over Oakland’s head, is against the November ballot measure.

“We were very surprised and, quite frankly, concerned,” to learn about the proposal, he said. “This is a project we want to do but we need decisions now,” Kaval said in an interview with KPIX5.

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“Race: Bubba Wallace” and the Future of NASCAR

CHICAGO DEFENDER — 300 Entertainment, the label home of Megan Thee Stallion launched a content and film division, 300 Studios. 300 Studios is headed by Kevin Liles, who is chairman and CEO of both 300 Entertainment and Elektra Music Group, with former Viacom executives Kelly Griffin as head of creative strategy and Nolan Baynes as GM.
The post “Race: Bubba Wallace” and the Future of NASCAR first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

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Danielle Sanders, Managing Editor, Chicago Defender

Race: Bubba Wallace is a six-episode docuseries following the life and career of Bubba Wallace, the only full-time black driver in the NASCAR cup series. “RACE” follows Wallace as he competes on Michael Jordan and Denny Hamlin’s racing team and uses his platform to speak out about racial injustice.

Race: Bubba Wallace Chicago Defender
NASCAR Driver, Bubba Wallace
Photo courtesy of Netflix

300 Entertainment, the label home of Megan Thee Stallion launched a content and film division, 300 Studios. 300 Studios is headed by Kevin Liles, who is chairman and CEO of both 300 Entertainment and Elektra Music Group, with former Viacom executives Kelly Griffin as head of creative strategy and Nolan Baynes as GM.

Race: Bubba Wallace is 300 Studios’ debut project. The studio currently has 30 projects in development including films, TV Series, and podcasts.

Race: Bubba Wallace Chicago Defender
Chicago native, Kelly “Kelly G” Griffin, Head of Creative Strategy (300 Studios) and one of the executive producers of “Race: Bubba Wallace”.

With over 15 years in Music Programming, Development, and Marketing for various companies including Clear Channel, Viacom, REVOLT TV and, now as head of creative strategy for 300 Studios, Kelly “Kelly G” Griffith has honed a unique talent of identifying up and coming superstars that ultimately prove to be profitable on various linear and digital platforms through an increase in streaming, record and ticket sales as well as overall brand recognition. From his days at WGCI to his work at BET, Kelly Griffith has also established himself as a premier programmer, talent booker, and producer.

The Chicago Defender spoke with Chicago native, Kelly “Kelly G” Griffin, head of creative strategy and one of the executive producers of the docuseries, Race: Bubba Wallace about the impact Bubba Wallace is having on the sport, the Netflix docuseries, and the future of 300 Studios.

Race: Bubba Wallace is currently streaming on Netflix.

The post “Race: Bubba Wallace” and the Future of NASCAR appeared first on Chicago Defender.

The post “Race: Bubba Wallace” and the Future of NASCAR first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

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