Connect with us

#NNPA BlackPress

Remembering Tina: The Legendary “Queen of Rock ‘n Roll” Passes Away at 83

Tributes are pouring in for legendary singer, songwriter and actress Tina Turner, who died last Wednesday. She was 83. “Tina Turner, the ‘Queen of Rock’n Roll’ has died peacefully today at the age of 83 after a long illness in her home in Küsnacht near Zurich, Switzerland,” her publicist said on last Wednesday. “There will […]
The post Remembering Tina: The Legendary “Queen of Rock ‘n Roll” Passes Away at 83 first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Published

on

Tributes are pouring in for legendary singer, songwriter and actress Tina Turner, who died last Wednesday. She was 83.

“Tina Turner, the ‘Queen of Rock’n Roll’ has died peacefully today at the age of 83 after a long illness in her home in Küsnacht near Zurich, Switzerland,” her publicist said on last Wednesday. “There will be a private funeral ceremony attended by close friends and family. Please respect the privacy of her family at this difficult time.”

1964: Tina Turner of the husband-and-wife R&B duo Ike & Tina Turner poses for a portrait in 1964. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

She was born Anna Mae Bullock on November 26, 1939, in Brownsville, Tennessee. She grew up in Nutbush, a tiny unincorporated community with a population of 259. Her parents, Floyd and Zelma Bullock were sharecroppers; Floyd supervised the harvests on the white-owned Poindexter farm. And the farm produced plenty. “Daddy’s garden must’ve covered an acre: Cabbages, onions, tomatoes and turnips, sweet potatoes, watermelons — we planted it all, and that garden fed us during the summer,” she wrote in her autobiography, I, Tina. “We had fresh eggs from our chickens and fresh milk from our cows.”

Anna Mae and her older sister Alline grew up in relative comfort. “Were we poor? I don’t remember being poor. My father was the top man on the farm; all the sharecroppers answered to him, and he answered to the owner. Daddy was in charge,” she later recalled. “We always had nice furniture in our house, and Alline and I always had our own separate bedroom.”

What they did not have was much in the way of closeness or affection. “I had no love from my mother or my father from the beginning, from birth,” she says in I, Tina. Her parents were often at odds and didn’t love each other: “Apparently, my mother had taken my father away from another girl — just out of spite […] they never really loved each other. They fought from the beginning,” she recalled. Those fights often turned physical.

When America entered World War II in 1941, Floyd and Zelma got jobs in the war effort. He worked as a laborer for a secret project; Zelma worked as a domestic in Knoxville, where the two stayed for over two years. The children stayed back home with grandparents. After the war, the Bullocks reunited with their children in Knoxville, then returned to Nutbush. Anna Mae attended Flagg Grove Elementary School from grades one through eight. That one-room schoolhouse is now the Tina Turner Museum.

CIRCA 1969: Tina Turner of the husband-and-wife R&B duo Ike & Tina Turner sings during a recording session in circa 1969. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

When Anna Mae was 11, her mother abruptly moved to St. Louis. Zelma had finally left Floyd — and her kids. Shortly afterward, her father remarried and moved to Detroit, leaving Anna Mae and Alline behind. Anna Mae started working as a housekeeper and babysitter for the Hendersons, a young white family.

She and Alline moved to stay with their maternal grandmother for a time before Anna Mae moved back to the family farm with her paternal grandmother (whom she called “Mama Georgie”). But when Mama Georgie died, Anna Mae moved to St. Louis with her mother and sister. It was in St. Louis where Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm came to play.

Ike (born Izear Luster Turner in 1931) had a band: saxophonists, a guitarist, a drummer, and his nephew on bass. Ike played piano and guitar. The band played at clubs in east St. Louis. At that time, 17-year-old Anna Mae and 20-year-old Alline had started going out to local clubs. One night they went to the Club Manhattan, where the band was playing.

Transfixed by Ike’s guitar playing, Anna Mae returned over the next several weeks. People would get up and sing with the band at times during their shows, and Anna Mae longed to do the same. One night, she got her chance. While Ike was playing on the organ between sets, Anna Mae started singing along as Ike played the B.B. King song “You Know I Love You.” Ike was so blown away by her voice that he jumped offstage and asked if she knew any more songs. Anna Mae started singing with the band.

Zelma Bullock found out — and hit the roof. “She hit me a backhand lick to the side of my face,” Tina wrote later, “and when I saw it had given me a nosebleed, I nearly hit her back.” Zelma did not want her daughter out with Ike Turner. But he charmed her when he visited the house, promising that he’d take care of Anna Mae. Zelma agreed. Anna Mae resumed performing.

Husband-and-wife R&B duo Ike & Tina Turner pose for a portrait with their back up dancers “The Ikettes”, 1968. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

“From then on, Ike and I were like brother and sister,” she wrote. He bought Anna Mae stage clothes and taught her about voice control and performance. They were strictly platonic at this point: Ike was living with a woman named Lorraine Taylor, and Anna Mae was falling for Ike’s saxophonist Raymond Hill. “I moved in with Raymond for a while,” she said years later. “We talked about marriage or whatever, but it didn’t happen. Soon he was gone.”

Soon she was pregnant. Anna Mae gave birth to their son Raymond Craig on Aug. 20, 1958. Zelma was displeased by her daughter being a teenage mother, so Anna Mae moved out into her own apartment and took a day job as a nurse’s assistant at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the largest hospital in Missouri. But she would still sing with the band on dates. She even recorded with them; on the 1958 song “Boxtop,” she earned her first recording credit (billed as “Little Ann”).

Shortly thereafter, her relationship with Ike changed. They had been close friends: sometimes Anna Mae would even sleep over at Ike and Lorraine’s place. But while Ike was broken up with Lorraine, one of the musicians threatened to come into Anna Mae’s room (there were no locks). Instead, she shared a bed with Ike — who had more than just sleeping on his mind.

As their personal relationship turned romantic, their working relationship also changed. In 1959, Ike wrote “A Fool in Love” for Art Lassiter, whom he’d chosen as the band’s lead singer. But Art never showed up for the recording session. So Ike had Anna Mae sing on the demo. The demo tape found its way to Juggy Murray, head of Sue Records. He told Ike the song worked better with a girl singer and signed Ike to a record contract. Ike changed Anna’s name (Tina rhymed with Sheena, Queen of the Jungle, one of his favorite TV shows) and the name of the band: to the Ike and Tina Turner Revue.

American singer, songwriter, and actress Tina Turner performs at the Brighton Centre, Brighton, UK, 11th March 1985. (Photo by John Rogers/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Anna Mae had reservations about the name change — and their relationship. “I didn’t want our relationship to go any farther,” she later wrote. I knew it could never work out between us.” She told Ike how she felt; he grabbed a shoe stretcher and beat her with it.

Tina felt trapped: “As horrible as he treated me, I still felt responsible for letting him down,” she told Rolling Stone in 1986. “And I was afraid to leave. I knew I had no place to hide, because he knew where my people were. My mother was actually living in Ike’s house in St. Louis. My sister was living in an apartment basically rented by Ike.”

So she stayed — and became Tina Turner.

“A Fool in Love”

By January 1960, Tina was pregnant — this time by Ike (who had gotten back together with Lorraine). Tina developed hepatitis and then jaundice; she spent six weeks in the hospital. Meanwhile, the record that would make her a star was gaining traction. Ike decided to go on tour. He snuck Tina out of the hospital and onto the road.

“A Fool in Love” was released in July 1960. In August, it hit No. 2 on the R&B charts, and in October it peaked at No. 27 on the pop charts — just as Ike and Tina were appearing on “American Bandstand.” Despite being eight months pregnant, Tina was doing shows in Vegas, dancing and singing with her background singers (whom Ike named the Ikettes). Only in Vegas did Ike realize Tina might need to visit a hospital.

They hightailed it to L.A., where Tina gave birth to their son Ronald Renelle on Oct. 27, 1960. A fed-up Lorraine left Ike for good. Once Tina was out of the hospital, she did a show in Oakland before taking two weeks to recover. But recovery was difficult. She was already unhappy by 1961, writing later that Ike was “totally unpredictable.” “Out of nowhere, he would leap up from a couch and walk right up to you and —pow! And you’d go, ‘What did I do? What’s wrong?’ Pow! again,” she wrote. “It was insane. It got to be that I always had a black eye and a busted lip — that was the standard beat-up.”

But she still accepted his proposal. One night, during a moment of tenderness, Ike asked Tina to marry him. She said yes “because if you said no to Ike, you were going to get beat up a few days later.” They rode to Tijuana, found a justice of the peace and married in 1962. Ike bought a house in L.A.; he and Tina brought their son Ronald, Tina’s son Raymond Craig, and Ike’s sons Michael and Ike, Jr. from St. Louis to live with them. But they were rarely home. Ike & Tina had several more hit singles, including “I Think It’s Gonna Work Out Fine” (No. 2 R&B, No. 14 pop) in 1961. But most of their income came from constant touring.

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND – MAY 14: Tina Turner smiles during the presentation of the music project ‘Beyond – Three Voices For Peace’ on May 14, 2009 in Zurich, Switzerland. The CD contains a spiritual message by Tina Turner. (Photo by Miguel Villagran/Getty Images)

“River Deep, Mountain High”

In 1966, record producer Phil Spector negotiated a contract with Ike to record with Tina. His song: “River Deep, Mountain High.” “I loved that song,” Tina said in her autobiography. “Because for the first time in my life, it wasn’t just R&B — it had structure, it had a melody.” The song failed in the United States but was a smash overseas, peaking at No. 3 on the UK charts. Within months, Ike and Tina were touring with the Rolling Stones. Band members Mick Jagger and Keith Richards became Tina’s lifelong friends.

But Tina’s depression deepened after she and Ike returned to America. Ike’s violence and philandering continued; he got Ann Thomas, one of the Ikettes, pregnant. “When I found out that Ann was pregnant by Ike, I lost all feeling for him as my husband,” she later wrote. That was it.” Worse yet, Ike started using cocaine, which made him even more violent and unpredictable: “Ike was beating me with phones, with shoes, with the hangers, choking me, punching me—it wasn’t just slapping anymore.”

In 1968, Tina attempted suicide by swallowing 50 Valium; she had to have her stomach pumped. But when she got out of the hospital, Ike made her go right back to work. And when Tina developed bronchitis a year later, he was unrelenting. Tina kept working, and it turned into tuberculosis. But after a couple weeks in the hospital, she was back on the road.

In 1970, at Tina’s encouragement, they shifted musically, from R&B to rock & roll. The move paid off with the 1970 albums Come Together and Workin’ Together. The first album featured a cover of Sly Stone’s “I Want to Take You Higher.” The second became their highest-charting album. It contained their cover of a song by rock band Credence Clearwater Revival: “Proud Mary.” Ike and Tina remade the song, with Tina’s famous “nice and easy” opening. Their version became their biggest hit ever, soaring to No. 4 on the Billboard charts and selling over a million copies. It won them a Grammy for Best R&B Performance.

Tina wrote the group’s last major hit, a song about her hometown: “Nutbush City Limits” (1973). But the hits soon dried up. Ike became more volatile as his cocaine addiction worsened, while Tina discovered Buddhism and used chanting as a form of solace. In 1974 she landed a role in Tommy (1975), playing the Acid Queen in the filmed version of the Who’s rock opera. “It was a small part,” she wrote later, “but it was my part. It gave me strength. I could feel myself growing.”

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – NOVEMBER 07: Tina Turner and Adrienne Warren speak during “Tina – The Tina Turner Musical” opening night at Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on November 07, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)

That growth annoyed Ike, who resented Tina succeeding without him. Things got worse: he once threw a pot of boiling hot coffee in her face, causing third-degree burns. As the boys neared adulthood and the abuse continued, Tina found fewer reasons to stay. Gradually, she started leaving: once for three days, then for two weeks. Upon returning, she told Ike: “I really cannot stay with you any longer.”

Ike didn’t listen. He lined up gigs around the time of America’s bicentennial; they’d play in Dallas during 4th of July weekend. On July 3, 1976, they flew to Dallas, where they were scheduled to perform at a Hilton hotel. On the way to the airport, signs of trouble were already brewing: Tina had on a white Yves St. Laurent suit, Ike had a box of chocolates that was melting in the Texas sun. He offered them to Tina; she said no. He backhanded her.

After their flight, they arrived at the DFW airport and rode to the hotel. Inside the limo, Ike backhanded Tina again. This time, she fought back. He kept hitting, and so did she. “By the time we got to the Hilton, the left side of my face was swollen out past my ear and blood was everywhere,” Tina wrote. They went up to their room, where Ike fell asleep. Tina grabbed her toiletry bag and left. She ran out of the back of the hotel, down an alley, and across a freeway. She arrived at the Ramada Inn with just 36 cents and a Mobil gas card, promising the owner that she’d pay him back. He agreed. When she woke up the next morning, it was July 4, 1976 — Independence Day.

Tina filed for divorce later that month; the divorce was finally settled in 1978. (She walked away with just her two Jaguars — and her name.) She started staying at friends’ houses, cleaning them as payment. Then she started working on a new act. When Roger Davies became her manager in 1979, Tina was performing cabaret at nightclubs; he steered her back towards rock. Tina opened for the Stones in 1981.

In 1982, Heaven 17, the British synth-pop band, recruited her to sing a remake of the Temptations’ “Ball of Confusion.” The song led to a new record deal for Turner with Capitol Records. Roger Davies then suggested that she and Heaven 17’s Martyn Ware cut a remake of Al Green’s “Let’s Stay Together.” Tina’s version hit the Top 30 in the U.S. With that, and the support of her friend David Bowie, Turner began recording her Capitol debut, Private Dancer.

Released in June 1984, Private Dancer was critically acclaimed and hit No. 3 on the Billboard album chart, where it stayed for three months. (Blocking it from number one were Purple Rain and Born in the USA.) The album went multiplatinum, selling over five million copies in the U.S. and over 10 million worldwide. The title track hit the Top 10 on both the R&B and pop charts; so did “Show Some Respect.”

The lead single, “What’s Love Got to Do with It?” hit No. 1 in September. It was Tina’s first (and only) number-one hit. At 45, she became the oldest female singer ever to top the Billboard singles chart. And at the 1985 Grammy Awards, “What’s Love” won for Best Female Pop Vocal performance, Song of the Year, and Record of the Year. (“Better Be Good to Me” won for Best Rock Performance.)

That year, Tina played the villain Aunty Entity in Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome. The film was a box-office hit, and Tina won an NAACP Image Award for best actress. She recorded two songs for the soundtrack: “We Don’t Need Another Hero” (which hit No. 2 on Billboard) and “One of the Living” (which won her another Grammy for Best Rock Performance).

In 1986, Turner released her next album, Break Every Rule. The lead single “Typical Male” also peaked at No. 2, and “Back Where You Started” earned Turner her third straight Grammy for Best Rock Performance. She also published her best-selling autobiography I, Tina. And she found love again, this time with German record executive Erwin Bach.

Bach was assigned to pick her up from the airport in 1985; sparks flew immediately. “It was love at first sight,” Turner told Oprah Winfrey in an interview. “He had the prettiest face. You could not miss it. It was like saying, ‘Where did he come from?’ He was really that good looking.” Despite the age difference (he was 30; she was 46), she and Bach connected. In her 2020 book Happiness Becomes You: A Guide to Changing Your Life for Good, she credited him with teaching her how “to love without giving up who I am.”

“We grant each other freedom and space to be individuals at the same time we are a couple,” Turner wrote. “Erwin, who is a force of nature in his own right, has never been the least bit intimidated by my career, my talents, or my fame. He shows me that true love doesn’t require the dimming of my light so that he can shine. On the contrary, we are the light of each other’s lives, and we want to shine as bright as we can, together.”

And shine she did. In 1987, Turner embarked on her “Break Every Rule” tour, one of the year’s highest-grossing. In Brazil in 1988, she fulfilled a long-held dream by selling out a massive stadium. 180,000 people came to see Tina Turner at the Maracana Stadium in Rio, setting a record for the largest paid concert by a female artist.

The next year, Turner released the album Foreign Affair, which produced one of her most timeless singles, “The Best.” The album title reflected its production in London and Paris. But it also described Tina’s personal life: when she turned 50 in 1989, Bach asked her to marry him. She refused, but the two continued to live together.

In 1993, Tina re-recorded some of her hits for the soundtrack of What’s Love Got To Do With It? (1993), based on her book. She also recorded a new single: “I Don’t Wanna Fight,” her last top 10 hit. Both Angela Bassett and Laurence Fishburne earned Oscar nominations for their portrayals of Ike and Tina Turner.

In 1995, Tina and Bach moved to Switzerland. She toured to support her albums Wildest Dreams (1996) and Twenty Four Seven (1999). Even when she wasn’t performing, she could still sell records: her 2004 greatest-hits album All the Best went platinum, becoming her highest-charting record. In 2008, she embarked on her final tour: a six-month farewell journey around the world. She officially retired in 2009.

In 2013, Turner and Bach finally married, cementing what she called “a long, beautiful relationship — and my one true marriage.” But according to Closer Weekly, Turner suffered a stroke just three months after marrying Erwin. She spent 10 days in the hospital and had to relearn how to walk. She was diagnosed with colon cancer in January 2016. A month later, she underwent surgery to remove the cancerous part of her intestine. But high blood pressure damaged her kidneys.

“By December 2016, my kidneys were at a new low of 20 percent and plunging rapidly. And I faced two choices: either regular dialysis or a kidney transplant,” she wrote in her 2018 memoirTina Turner, My Love Story. “Only the transplant would give me a very good chance of leading a near-normal life. But the chances of getting a donor kidney were remote.” Thankfully, Bach donated one of his. “I’m happy to say that, thanks to my beloved husband, Erwin, giving me one of his kidneys, the gift of life, I’m in good health and loving life every day,” she wrote in the book. “I’m also thankful that I’ve not only survived, but thrived, so that I can pass on to you this book containing precious gifts that were given to me — the greatest gifts I can offer.”

She had one last gift for her fans. Tina, a musical based on her life, premiered in London in 2018 and on Broadway the following year. Adrienne Warren, who played the title role, won a Tony in 2020 for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical. Upon learning of Turner’s passing, Warren paid tribute to the woman she played: “Today I lost a teacher and a mentor,” Warren captioned her post. “Rest, my friend. I love you, Anna Mae Bullock. Thank you.”

“My beloved queen, I love you endlessly,” Beyoncé wrote on her website. “I’m so grateful for your inspiration, and all the ways you have paved the way […] You are the epitome of power and passion. We are all so fortunate to have witnessed your kindness and beautiful spirit that will forever remain. Thank you for all you have done.”

Lizzo paid tribute to Turner with a performance of “Proud Mary” during her tour stop. “Today we lost an icon,” a visibly emotional Lizzo told the crowd at Footprint Center in Phoenix. “I haven’t allowed myself to be sad, I haven’t allowed myself to cry. I don’t want to right now, because I’d much rather celebrate.” She added: “As a Black girl with a rock band, I wouldn’t exist were it not for the queen of rock & roll.”

The post Remembering Tina: The Legendary “Queen of Rock ‘n Roll” Passes Away at 83 appeared first on Houston Forward Times.

The post Remembering Tina: The Legendary “Queen of Rock ‘n Roll” Passes Away at 83 first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Forward Times Staff

#NNPA BlackPress

PRESS ROOM: Revolutionizing Economic Equality: Our Money United to Launch the Black Wall Street Spending Ticker, Transforming Consumer Spending and Corporate Accountability

NNPA NEWSWIRE — Our Money United is a pledged-based grassroots campaign led by Friends of the Movement and the nation’s top civil and civic rights organizations to educate consumers on the power of their spending, giving, and investing. The campaign will highlight and reward Corporations that have become friends of the movement and measure their progress on eliminating barriers to economic inclusion. Visit www.ourmoneyunited.com for more information about Our Money United.
The post PRESS ROOM: Revolutionizing Economic Equality: Our Money United to Launch the Black Wall Street Spending Ticker, Transforming Consumer Spending and Corporate Accountability first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Published

on

By

Our Money United Will Unveil Revolutionary Technology to Reshape Consumer Spending and Foster Economic Equality

Atlanta, GA — On Tuesday, March 12, 2024, Our Money United will unveil the Black Wall Street Spending Ticker, a pioneering technology driving a consumer spending transformation with corporate accountability. The highly anticipated reveal of the Conscious Spending Platform is led by Friends of the Movement (FotM) Global, the Atlanta Black Chambers Foundation, the Russell Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship, and the Original Black Wall Street (Greenwood-Tulsa Chamber), in collaboration with civil rights and social justice organizations nationwide. The Russell Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship (RICE), the largest Black incubator in the nation, will house the Black Wall Street Ticker. Pioneering as the pilot launch city, Atlanta is a conscious city and supporter of FotM.

The Black Wall Street Spending Ticker is the first of the various conscious tickers representing ethnic groups visually showcasing the collective spending influence of conscious spending groups, casting a vigilant eye on global citizens while holding corporations accountable. Similar to the Nasdaq, The Black Wall Street Ticker, signifies a new era of transparency and responsibility, visually encapsulating the collective impact of consumers in the marketplace. The Black Wall Street Spending Ticker will meticulously monitor spending within the Black community and its allies, rewarding those actively contributing to closing the wealth gap.

“As we unveil the Black Wall Street Spending Ticker, we’re not just tracking dollars, we’re tracking the heartbeat of economic justice,” says Dr. Charles Champ Walker, Chief Economic Empowerment Officer of FotM Global. “This transformative initiative signals a shift where every conscious purchase becomes a vote for a more equitable and prosperous future. Together, through the power of our wallets, we are rewriting the narrative of economic empowerment and leaving an indelible mark on the path toward true equality.”

Powering the Black Wall Street Ticker is the Voter Wallet, a tool that empowers consumers to align spending with their values and exercise their economic voting power. The Voter Wallet connects consumers with a network of aligned conscious groups and merchants reporting aggregate spending data to the ticker. Seamlessly integrating spending, giving, and investments within each group, the Voter Wallet provides a real-time window into the tangible impact of contributions within one’s community. The Voter Wallet will support Black and ally businesses while helping to close the wealth gap.

The unveiling of the first Black Wall Street Ticker will be on Tuesday, March 12, 2024, at 11:30 a.m. at the Russell Innovation Center for Entrepreneurship (RICE). RICE is located in the heart of the Atlanta University Center at 504 Fair St SW, Atlanta, GA 30313. For more information on Friends of the Movement, Our Money United, the Black Wall Street Spending Ticker, or the Voter Wallet, visit http://www.ourmoneyunited.com or contact press@ourmoneyunited.com. Ready to become a Friend of the Movement? Visit www.FotMGlobal.com to take the pledge.

About Our Money United

Our Money United is a pledged-based grassroots campaign led by Friends of the Movement and the nation’s top civil and civic rights organizations to educate consumers on the power of their spending, giving, and investing. The campaign will highlight and reward Corporations that have become friends of the movement and measure their progress on eliminating barriers to economic inclusion. Visit http://www.ourmoneyunited.com for more information about Our Money United.

About Friends of the Movement (FotM) Global

Friends of the Movement Global (FotM), is a conscious spending platform where conscious spending converges with cutting-edge technology to usher in a social and economic change like never before. In an era where every dollar wields the potential to shape our collective future, FotM is at the forefront of revolutionizing how we spend, give, and invest. FotM’s mission is to empower individuals and groups to make a lasting impact by voting with their wallets at the cash register and endorsing policymakers aligned with their values through donation votes. FotM proudly introduces the World’s first Conscious Spending Platform – the Voter Wallet, a groundbreaking concept that sets us apart as pioneers in the field. FotM believes money should be a force for good, not just a transaction.

Step into a new era of conscious spending, where every purchase or donation becomes a potent instrument for positive transformation. FotM lives by the principle that what gets measured gets done. Tracking spending and giving, FotM will display it on the Black Wall Street Spending Tickers throughout the country fostering accountability for ourselves and corporations alike. FotM helps turn financial choices into a brighter future. Together, we redefine the possibilities of conscious consumerism, one transaction at a time. Visit http://www.fotmglobal.com for more information about Friends of the Movement Global.

The post PRESS ROOM: Revolutionizing Economic Equality: Our Money United to Launch the Black Wall Street Spending Ticker, Transforming Consumer Spending and Corporate Accountability first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

Federal Prosecutors Seek Death Penalty for White Man Who Fatally Shot 10 Black People in Buffalo Grocery Store

Gendron is already serving a life sentence without parole after pleading guilty to New York state murder charges in November 2022.
The post Federal Prosecutors Seek Death Penalty for White Man Who Fatally Shot 10 Black People in Buffalo Grocery Store first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Published

on

By Stacy M. Brown

NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Federal prosecutors announced on Friday, Jan. 12, their intention to pursue the death penalty for Payton Gendron, a 20-year-old white man responsible for a racist rampage that claimed the lives of 10 Black shoppers at a Buffalo grocery store in May 2022. Prosecutors revealed the decision in a court filing before a scheduled status conference hearing at the Robert H. Jackson Federal Courthouse in Buffalo.

Gendron is already serving a life sentence without parole after pleading guilty to New York state murder charges in November 2022. Defense attorneys have expressed Gendron’s willingness to plead guilty to federal hate crimes and weapons violations if prosecutors choose not to pursue the death penalty.

“Today’s decision by the Department of Justice provides a pathway to both relief and a measure of closure for the victims and their families,” said civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump. “They have been pleading for full justice for nearly two years, and today they are one step closer. We thank the DOJ for its diligence and for fighting for those whose lives were so tragically affected by this atrocity. We ask that you continue to keep the victims, their families, and the entire Buffalo community in your prayers as they continue to grieve and pursue full justice for those who were stolen from them.”

The announcement follows a nearly 20-month Justice Department case review, marking the first time Attorney General Merrick Garland has authorized a new capital prosecution. President Joe Biden, who campaigned against the death penalty, faced criticism from civil rights groups, arguing that the death penalty historically and disproportionately affects racial minorities and the poor. Garland issued a moratorium on federal executions in 2021, which remains in place but does not prevent prosecutors from seeking a death sentence.

In 2023, emotions ran high at a sentencing hearing as the sister of one of the victims confronted Gendron. Chaos erupted when an enraged man charged at the defendant, leading to authorities rushing Gendron out of the courtroom. After returning, Judge Susan Egan acknowledged the pain experienced by the victims’ families but emphasized the need for appropriate conduct.

Gendron, who had targeted a specific predominantly Black Buffalo zip code, admitted to the racially charged massacre. He said he regretted his actions, attributing them to online hate and the belief in the “replacement theory.” Gendron was sentenced to life in prison by Judge Egan, who condemned his ideologies as “ignorant, hateful, and evil.”

 

The post Federal Prosecutors Seek Death Penalty for White Man Who Fatally Shot 10 Black People in Buffalo Grocery Store first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Continue Reading

#NNPA BlackPress

The Unchecked Path: Trump’s Victory in Iowa Sparks Concerns Over Accountability

Just one day before his second sexual assault civil trial was to begin, Trump cruised to a landslide victory in the Iowa caucuses, solidifying his front-runner status for the Republican presidential nomination.
The post The Unchecked Path: Trump’s Victory in Iowa Sparks Concerns Over Accountability first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Published

on

By Stacy M. Brown

NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent

@StacyBrownMedia

A good parent usually chastises and punishes their child when they’ve egregiously misbehaved. Jaywalkers get tickets, and murderers have received the death penalty. Generally, no one goes unpunished for breaking the law. Not in the United States. Not unless you are of a particular social and financial status, and the crime, for the most part, isn’t much more than white collar.

But that’s not the case with Donald J. Trump. Undoubtedly, Trump is the kid who has never been chastised or punished. And, as a grown-up, and certainly since his false election claim in 2020 and his egging on a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol, the twice-impeached and four-times indicted former president hasn’t seen a scintilla of punishment. One could argue that America, or his parents, have rewarded his unprecedented bad behavior.

Just one day before his second sexual assault civil trial was to begin, Trump cruised to a landslide victory in the Iowa caucuses, solidifying his front-runner status for the Republican presidential nomination. As several outlets reported, losing one-term presidents rarely mount subsequent successful primary campaigns, much less pull off landslides that demonstrate utter dominance of their party.

Trump transformed the GOP in 2016. By claiming 50% of the vote in the biggest win in caucus history, putting him on course for his third consecutive nomination, Trump showed that the current GOP is now entirely his party.

President Joe Biden beat Trump in the 2020 general election, 81 million popular votes to 75 million. And while both numbers were stunning, Trump’s was more telling, as it demonstrated that 75 million could vote for a man who single-handedly destroyed American Democracy, who championed white supremacy, caged babies, mocked the disabled, and called cowards American troops whom the enemy captured. Not all Trump followers are racist, but there’s no doubt that you must be a racist to be a Trump follower.

Biden’s victory over Trump came in part because his slogan, his message, “saving the soul of America,” resonated. It was the first time since President Obama’s “Yes We Can” that Dems had a message folks could understand and get behind. Mainly a message that the ultimate swing voters, African Americans, could embrace. During the current campaign, when Biden says there’s a need to “save Democracy,” the message falls flat particularly to African Americans who have come to a reckoning that Democracy today, like the Confederacy of decades ago, doesn’t work for Black people.

So, what are they saving? A system that fosters outright racism from politicians, the emphatic truth that Black Lives really don’t matter, and more than 75 million, including a few who were born Black (Ben Carson, Clarence Thomas, Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, etc.) show the worst of African Americans with their allegiance to slavery and their slave master Trump.

It indeed says a whole lot that Trump is the clear front-runner to return to office, where he promises that “on day one,” he’ll be a dictator. He’ll have people – read Black people — shot by police on the spot if they are deemed to have participated in shoplifting or any minor crime. Trump will get rid of the Affordable Care Act, which provides otherwise uninsured Black and poor people with life-saving healthcare coverage. He’ll release the seditious, murderous January 6 inmates whom he calls hostages.

Having already banned just about any book with a Black author or one that reveals true American history, Trump will ensure that publishing houses that produce such work will be shut down. That could also mean the Black Press of America, founded in New York 197 years ago before slavery ended in America.

Trump once proudly proclaimed that he could shoot someone on New York’s Fifth Avenue and get away with it. He also exclaimed on national television that he and other celebrities are allowed to grab a woman, any woman, by their private parts without permission, and it’s okay. Subsequently, a jury found him civilly responsible for sexual assault, and he currently has 91 felony charges pending against him.

And with a favorable U.S. Supreme Court and three of the justices he put there, Trump is on his way to proving the accuracy of his declarations of committing crimes and getting away with them. America has been good lately about canceling sexual predators, even those who were only accused of sexual assault. America has been good of late with jailing some of the January 6 perpetrators. A judge ordered Trump to pay $5 million after being found guilty of sexual assault, another judge is on the verge of ordering Trump to pay more than $250 million for massive business fraud, and evidence recently emerged that Trump probably sold U.S. secrets to foreign entities while in office. Yet, he swept to victory in Iowa and may easily defeat Biden in November. To Trump, there’s no better parent, none more lenient, than America.

The post The Unchecked Path: Trump’s Victory in Iowa Sparks Concerns Over Accountability first appeared on BlackPressUSA.

Continue Reading

Subscribe to receive news and updates from the Oakland Post

* indicates required

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending

Copyright ©2021 Post News Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved.