Connect with us

Government

Julia Means Appointed to the City of Milwaukee’s Board of Health

MILWAUKEE COURIER — Mayor Tom Barrett appointed Julia Means, Registered Nurse, to the City of Milwaukee’s newly created Board of Health last month on June 27. The nine-member commission will advise the Health Department on policy and advocate for public health practices that improve health outcomes for all Milwaukeeans. The citizen oversight board was created by legislation adopted by the Milwaukee Common Council and signed by the Mayor in February of 2019.

Published

on

By The Milwaukee Courier

Mayor Tom Barrett appointed Julia Means, Registered Nurse, to the City of Milwaukee’s newly created Board of Health last month on June 27. The nine-member commission will advise the Health Department on policy and advocate for public health practices that improve health outcomes for all Milwaukeeans. The citizen oversight board was created by legislation adopted by the Milwaukee Common Council and signed by the Mayor in February of 2019.

Means, a Community Health Ministry Nurse with Ascension Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital, part of Ascension Wisconsin, touches countless lives everyday through her faith-based work promoting education around chronic disease management, food security, infant mortality in our community and health navigation. Through Mean’s tireless work and dedication, she has made an incredible impact on many in the community.

“I don’t know Julia Means personally, but when I hear her name, the first word that comes to my mind is mentor,” said Kymm Robinson, Sherman Park neighborhood.

The importance of maternal and infant health cannot be overemphasized because it determines the health of the next generation and can help predict future public health challenges for families and our community.

“My cousin was a participant in the Blanket of Love Program and my auntie isn’t around to help her, so the program was important,” said neighbor Justin Patterson. “Julia Means is a teacher, a protector, a rescuer and a second mother. She’s a guardian angel. Without her, I don’t know where my baby cousin would be right now.”

Means is an instrumental mentor to young women and men because she had powerful mentors in her own life.

“I would never be where I am today without someone pushing me,” Means said. “I can help others because I had help.

By combining her nursing skills and her faith, Means has made an impact on Ascension Columbia St. Mary’s and across Ascension Wisconsin. She created an innovative collaboration with church congregations, city officials, homeless shelters, neighborhood centers, community partners and programs to create the “Blanket of Love” program in 2004. The program connects participants to resources that can help lower stress, support wellness and eliminate the two most preventable causes of infant death in Milwaukee: premature births and unsafe sleeping environments.

In 1996, Means became the first Parish Nurse at Ebenezer Church of God Christ. As a Parish Nurse, Means connected the church with the community.

“I’m blessed to work for an organization that fosters and encourages people to have faith in God. Ascension Wisconsin not only allows but encourages me to do my work and not hide my faith,” said Means. “If you take care of God’s business, He’ll take care of your business.” Means truly believes this is due to the countless examples of how God continues to work in her life and the lives of her participants.

“I see myself as the bridge between the community and the hospital. I’m an advocate for people in the community that feel they have no voice,” she added.

While Means is out and about, people always approach her and tell her how she’s impacted their lives. Children even run to her and call her grandma. “I have a new grandchild every day,” Means said.

Means is honored and thankful to wake up every day and do this work. Although people give Means recognition for the work she does daily, Means credits God.

“It’s not my work, It’s God’s work. I am grateful He chose me,” said Means.

Ascension St. Joseph Hospital is holding their 22nd Annual Concerts in the Park Series, Celebrating 140 years of service to the community. All concerts run from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Ballpark food will be on sale at all concerts, with proceeds benefiting a different neighborhood school each concert. There will also be free blood pressure and diabetes screening, fresh farmer’s market, courtesy of Mount Cavalry, and fun activities for children.

July 24 Eddie Butts Band August 7 Christopher’s Project
August 21 Joe Richter Band

This article originally appeared in the Milwaukee Courier

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Black History

Ambassador Ruth A. Davis Pioneered Diversity in Foreign Service

UC Berkeley Grad Continues to Bring International Economic Empowerment for Women

Published

on

Ambassador Ruth A. Davis (left) is meeting with Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton.

Ambassador Ruth A. Davis was recently named as a distinguished alumna by the School of Social Welfare at the University of California, Berkeley. 

She also has been honored by the U.S. State Department when a conference room at the Foreign Service Institute in Virginia was named in honor of her service as director of the Institute. She was the first African American to serve in that position.

Davis, a graduate of Spelman College received a master’s degree from UC Berkeley in 1968.

Congresswoman Barbara Lee, also a graduate of the School of Social Welfare, now chairs the House Appropriations Committee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. She praised Ambassador Davis as “a trailblazing leader and one of the great American diplomats of our time. Over her 40-year career, she had so many ‘firsts’ on her resume: the first Black director of the Foreign Service Institute, the first Black woman Director General of the Foreign Service, and the first Black woman to be named a Career Ambassador, to name just a few.

“She served all over the world, from Kinshasa to Tokyo to Barcelona, where she was consul general, and to Benin, where she served as ambassador,” Lee continued. “ I am so proud of her many accomplishments. She has represented the best of America around the world, and our world is a better place because of her service.”

During Davis’ 40-year career in the Foreign Service, she also served as chief of staff in the Africa Bureau, and as distinguished advisor for international affairs at Howard University. She retired in 2009 as a Career Ambassador, the highest-level rank in Foreign Service.

Since her retirement, Ambassador Davis has served as the chair (and a founding member) of the International Women’s Entrepreneurial Challenge (IWEC), an organization devoted to promoting women’s economic empowerment by creating an international network of businesswomen.

She also chairs the selection committee for the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Fellowship at Howard University’s Ralph Bunche International Affairs Center, where she helps to oversee the annual selection process. Finally, as vice president of the Association of Black American Ambassadors, she participates in activities involving the recruitment, preparation, hiring, retention, mentoring and promotion of minority Foreign Service employees.

Gay Plair Cobb, former Regional Administrator of the Women’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor in the Atlanta, and San Francisco offices, was Ambassador Davis’ roommate at UC Berkeley. Cobb said, “Ruth always exhibited outstanding leadership and a determined commitment to fairness, equal opportunity and activism, which we engaged in on a regular basis.”

Davis has received the Department of State’s Superior Honor Award, Arnold L. Raphel Memorial Award and Equal Employment Opportunity Award; the Secretary of State’s Achievement Award (including from Gen. Colin Powell); the Director General’s Foreign Service Cup; two Presidential Distinguished Service Awards; and Honorary Doctor of Laws from Middlebury and Spelman Colleges.

A native of Atlanta, Davis was recently named to the Economist’s 2015 Global Diversity List as one of the Top 50 Diversity Figures in Public Life and is the recipient of the American Foreign Service Association’s Lifetime Contributions to American Diplomacy Award.

 

The Oakland Post’s coverage of local news in Alameda County is supported by the Ethnic Media Sustainability Initiative, a program created by California Black Media and Ethnic Media Services to support community newspapers across California.

Continue Reading

Business

Development Group Proposes Black Panther Film Studios at Coliseum

Elaine Brown, former Black Panther Party leader and CEO of Oakland & the World Enterprises (OAW), has teamed up with master developer McCormack Baron Salazar (MBS), to create The Coliseum Dream development project.

Published

on

Elaine Brown via Twitter

Elaine Brown, former Black Panther Party leader and CEO of Oakland & the World Enterprises (OAW), has teamed up with master developer McCormack Baron Salazar (MBS), to create The Coliseum Dream development project.

Highlights of the Dream project are: readiness to purchase the city’s 50% interest; positive discussions with the Oakland A’s; installation of Black Panther Studios as development anchor, which will be the first Black-owned film studio on the West Coast; ability to finance the entire development, estimated at $5 billion; building of hundreds of affordable housing units; development of a luxury hotel and department store; creating and supporting youth tech, arts and business training centers; construction of a supermarket in a food desert; making Oakland a tourist destination.

Vince Bennett, president and CEO of MBS, a multi-billion-dollar housing developer based in St. Louis, said: “MBS is ready to immediately enter into a purchase and sale agreement with the City of Oakland and become the master developer of the entire site.”

The Coliseum Dream Development Group (CDDG) recognizes the impossibility of developing the Coliseum site solely by purchasing the city’s 50% interest. Partnership with the other 50% interest owner, the Oakland A’s, is necessary.  

Brown says she has discussed the site with Dave Kaval, A’s president, over the last few years, and said, “Dave has stated he loves the idea of Black Panther Studios as the anchor of CDDG’s development vision.”

The problem CDDG faces is not readiness on its part but the City Council’s unwillingness to entertain proposals other than those two they hand-picked in a recent closed session.

In a closed session scheduled for Thursday, October 7, the Council considered the merits of its two preferred proposals, based on reports from the City Administrator.  This closed session meeting arose from a vote of the Council’s Rules Committee on Thursday, September 30.  

In lieu of allowing Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan’s request to push through a resolution at the Council’s October 19 meeting to enter into an agreement with the group she is promoting, the Council decided to consider the two proposals.  

It’s unclear what happens next.

Brown said, “There is no process regarding the sale of the city’s interest in the Coliseum, certainly not one that is transparent.”

In a statement to the Oakland Post, Brown submitted the following questions and answers:

Q:  Everybody talks about jobs and housing.  Will your group be able to deliver on the promise in your Coliseum Dream proposal to create jobs and build affordable housing for the community?

A (Elaine Brown): “Oakland & the World Enterprises (OAW), of which I am CEO, is presently co-developing a $72 Million, 79-unit, 100% affordable housing project in West Oakland with master housing developer McCormack Baron Salazar (MBS), headed by CEO and President Vince Bennett. 

“This reflects my ongoing commitment to the ideal of the Black Panther Party, of which I was a leading member, of Black self-determination.  The track record of MBS for building affordable housing is without parallel.  Not only has MBS built thousands of affordable housing units throughout the U.S., as well as, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, MBS is currently building a $1 billion development in Dayton, Ohio, the Dayton Arcade, which includes hundreds of affordable housing units and is bringing residents, jobs, and visitors back to downtown Dayton.  

“Our Coliseum Dream anchor project, Black Panther Studios, alone, will create thousands of new, high-tech jobs, and we will build an affiliated tech training center to create a new generation of Black, tech-savvy “digital carpenters” to make films and enter the tech economy at a high end.

Q:  Even if you are willing and able to purchase the City’s 50% interest in the Coliseum site, how can you develop the site without either purchasing the A’s 50% or partnering with the A’s?

A, (Elaine Brown): “Our team is prepared to purchase the City’s 50% interest outright, today.  We have not discussed purchasing the A’s 50% interest with the A’s, but, if that were an option, we would take it.  We have been in discussions with Dave Kaval, A’s president, over the last two years about our Coliseum Dream, and Dave has unequivocally stated that if we were to acquire the City’s 50%, he would work with us.  And, we have told Dave, we are willing to partner with the A’s.”

The Dream Proposal is available here: https://bit.ly/thecoliseumdream

The Oakland Post’s coverage of local news in Alameda County is supported by the Ethnic Media Sustainability Initiative, a program created by California Black Media and Ethnic Media Services to support community newspapers across California.

Continue Reading

Government

The Lookout: Gov. Newsom Signs Bills Written to Fix Injustices 

One such restorative measure is Senate Bill 796 introduced by State Sen. Steven Bradford (D – Gardena) that allows Bruce’s Beach, an oceanside plot of land in Los Angeles County, to be returned to the descendants of its original owners.

Published

on

Gavin Newsom/iStock

Watching your tax dollars, elected officials and legislation that affects you.

Last week, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a number of bills lawmakers introduced to address injustices. 

One such restorative measure is Senate Bill 796 introduced by State Sen. Steven Bradford (D – Gardena) that allows Bruce’s Beach, an oceanside plot of land in Los Angeles County, to be returned to the descendants of its original owners.

“We’re making history by righting historic wrongs. With new legislation that will allow the transfer of Bruce’s Beach back to its rightful owners, we’re taking a step closer to making the CA Dream a reality for all. Thank you to all who have kept the legacy of this place alive,” Newsom tweeted.

Almost a century ago, the Black couple who owned the property now called Bruce’s Beach set it up as a residential enclave and resort for other Black families. They lost their property when the city of Manhattan Beach used eminent domain laws to forcefully and illegally seize their land following white neighbors’ complaints. 

Last week, Newsom also signed two criminal justice bills, Assembly Bill (AB) 518 and Senate Bill (SB) 586.

AB 518 will allow a judge to choose someone’s sentence based on their own discretion instead of being required to choose the longest possible sentence.

Assemblymember Buffy Wicks (D-Oakland), who authored AB 518, took to Twitter to celebrate the bill becoming law.

“For too long, our laws sought to impose the strictest sentence possible, in every situation — regardless of the circumstance. AB 518 gives judges more discretion when sentencing. A step towards a fairer criminal justice system,” Wicks tweeted.

SB 586, also known as the Kenneth Ross Jr. Decertification Act of 2021 will bar police officers from serving in other California precincts if they were fired for misconduct.

Sen. Bradford named the bill he introduced after Kenneth Ross Jr., an unarmed Black man who was killed by an officer who had been involved in another “questionable” shooting.

Newsom, standing side-by-side with Bradford and other lawmakers, spoke about SB 586 and other criminal justice bills at a press conference he held in a school gym in Oakland last on September 30. 

“We have a lot to be proud of but there are areas where we have nothing to brag about,” Newsom said. “California has asserted itself in certain areas but it is remarkable that we still struggle in other areas.”

Newsom went on to express his frustration about California being behind 46 other states when it comes to decertification legislation.

“Why is it so hard to do the right thing,” he asked.

Fouzia Almarou, Kenneth Ross Jr.’s mother, also spoke at the press conference.

“This bill means a lot because it’s going to stop police from attacking, targeting and being racist toward Black and Brown people. I’m tired of it,” she said. 

Continue Reading

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending