Connect with us

Arts and Culture

2013 SF Day of the Dead Exhibit Dedicated to Lives Impacted by Cancer

Published

on

By Sally Douglas Arce

Day of the Dead celebrations have their origin in this country in Mexican and Mexican American traditions. Here in the San Francisco Bay Area, African Americans and people of other ethnicities participate in the Day of the Dead.

 

They have found the holiday to be an important way to celebrate and be grateful to life and to honor the spirits of the dead.

Bay Area African American artists have participated in Day of the Dead exhibits for almost two decades.

The Day of the Dead 2013 exhibition at SOMArts Cultural Center includes traditional altars and multi-dimensional art installations by more than 80 Bay Area artists.

The “Imagining Time, Gathering Memory” exhibition is on view Saturday, Oct. 12 through Saturday, Nov. 9 at SOMArts Cultural Center, 934 Brannan St., San Francisco.

There is free admission during gallery hours Tuesday–Friday, 12 p.m. –7 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.–5 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. The exhibit is dedicated to those whose lives have been affected by cancer.

Rashida James-Saadiya, an African American artist who lives in Oakland, has created an installation in homage to Trayvon Martin and particularly his parents and family.

The installation includes child’s chair on which a photo of Trayvon when he graduated from kindergarten is placed. A handmade frame with beads and fabric from Ghana holds Trayvon’s photo. The ” Golden Stool” is a sacred symbol of the Ashanti nation, believed to possess the memory and spirit of its owner.

In front of the chair, she has placed a Ndebele doll, which in Africa is often used to teach and is for remembrance and ritual purposes. Dolls are handmade and traditionally handed down through generations.

“The doll represents Trayvon’s mother guarding his spirit, guarding his chair,” says James-Saadiya of her hand-made doll. “I want to address the fact that children are being removed from society far too soon. The impact on the family and the community was seldom addressed.”

She wants people seeing her piece to ask, “What are the conversations we need to have in the community so that senseless deaths don’t happen?”

Michael Ross and sculptural furniture artist William Rhodes have worked collaboratively with about 75 youth (ages 5-13) attending art classes at three San Francisco schools.

Rhodes is an art instructor employed by the “Dare to Dream” program at the Bayview Opera House. “I wanted to build an altar inspired by home and a sense of place that represents the memories over time of each student’s family and larger community,” Rhodes says.

Each student has created small houses of varying sizes, painting and decorating them, as well as placing personal items inside the mini-house. One girl, who is Chinese American and attends Portola School, has included her baby blanket, favorite toys, and family photos in her home.

Oakland based conceptual and installation artist Candi Farlice has created a large flower using beeswax, copper wire, paper and scent. “It represents a flower that has been picked and is beginning to deteriorate,” Farlice, who is African American, says.

“The flower represents the process of death. We are all alive, but at the same time, we are dying some each day. Each stage of that is beautiful in its own way.”

The “Imagining Time, Gathering Memory” exhibit includes special events. The opening reception takes place from 6 p.m.-9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 11 and features the all women’s band Las Bomberas de la Bahia and dancer Paloma McFly.

Gathering the Embers: A Día de los Muertos Tribute Show, from 7 p.m.–9:30 p.m., Friday, Oct. 25, features multi-disciplinary performers presenting an evening of story and performance.

The closing reception, which is from 6 p.m.-9 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 9, will include live music, a Day of the Dead artists’ market and an opportunity to interact with the exhibit for the last time.

When there is no special event, there is no charge for admission to the gallery. For more information, visit www.somarts.org or call (415) 863-1414.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat, A Troubled Soul

Basquiat often said that he “felt friendless and misunderstood.” After his parents separated, Gerard moved with his children to Brooklyn’s Boerum Hill neighborhood. When he was 7, Basquiat’s mother was diagnosed as mentally ill and was eventually institutionalized. This part of his life troubled him greatly.

Published

on

Untitled, 1981 by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Wikipedia photo.
Untitled, 1981 by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Wikipedia photo.

By Tamara Shiloh

It was the early summer of 1980. More than 100 artists converged on an abandoned four-story building at Seventh Avenue and 41st Street in New York City that had once served as a massage parlor. Among those in the group was Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988). His work on exhibit was believed to have been his first painting on canvas.

Although the exhibition, dubbed “The Times Square Show,” drew critical attention, it boosted 18-year-old Basquiat’s career as a painter. His contribution, a mural painted on a patch of wall, was described by Art in America as “a knockout combination of de Kooning and subway paint scribbles.”

The path to that shuttered massage parlor and his rise to success during the 1980s as part of the Neo-expressionism movement were not without difficulty.

Basquiat was born into a middle-class family in Brooklyn. His father, Gerard, a Haitian immigrant, was an accountant. His mother, Mathilde, was a homemaker. Despite her frequent hospital stays for depression, Mathilde spent countless hours in the Museum of Modern Art and the Brooklyn Museum with Jean-Michel, encouraging his interest in painting.

Gerard, physically abusive, wasn’t involved in his son’s career. Biographies and films have chronicled the strained relationship between the two, according to DNA Info.

Basquiat often said that he “felt friendless and misunderstood.” After his parents separated, Gerard moved with his children to Brooklyn’s Boerum Hill neighborhood. When he was 7, Basquiat’s mother was diagnosed as mentally ill and was eventually institutionalized. This part of his life troubled him greatly.

By age 17, Basquiat dropped out of high school. Gerard then threw him out of the house. He stayed with friends, slept in Washington Square Park, and lived-in run-down hotels.

It was then that he partnered with other graffiti artists and created the persona, SAMO, meaning “same old sh––.” For money, he panhandled and sold sweatshirts and postcards marked with his drawings. He got by on “cheap red wine and 15¢ bags of Cheetos.”

With no formal training, Basquiat created work that mixed graffiti and signs with the gestural and intuitive approach of Abstract Expressionist painting.

He expressed his personal angst in highly stylized self-portraits. In the early ’80s, race entered his work for the first time as a reflection of a “growing consciousness of his own position within the New York art world.”

His painting, “The Death of Michael Stewart” commemorates the killing of the young Black artist by New York City Transit Police. “Black people are never really portrayed realistically…. I mean, not even portrayed in modern art enough,” Basquiat had said.

Basquiat died of a drug overdose in 1988. Toward the end of his life, his works were selling around $25,000 to the Whitney Museum and the Museum of Modern Art.

Earlier though, both museums had rejected his work.

Be inspired by Basquiat’s paintings, read “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me” by Maya Angelou, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Sarah Jane Boyers.

Continue Reading

Arts and Culture

Deputy Library Director Bestowed National Honor

A respected national publication called Library Journal took notice and awarded Deputy MCFL Director Raemona Little Taylor in its 2022 Movers & Shakers class of community builders for her outstanding leadership and impact to the library industry as a change agent. Only 41 people were in the 2022 class, and just over 1,000 librarians nationwide have earned such status since the awards were first given in 2002.

Published

on

Deputy MCFL Director Raemona Little Taylor did not let the pandemic get in the way of her equity work to benefit library patrons. (Photo: Library Journal)
Deputy MCFL Director Raemona Little Taylor did not let the pandemic get in the way of her equity work to benefit library patrons. (Photo: Library Journal)

Raemona Little Taylor earns accolade as advocate and literacy partner

Courtesy of Marin County

Advancing equity, from talk to action, is a trademark for Raemona Little Taylor, Deputy Director of the Marin County Free Library (MCFL). And there’s no way the COVID-19 pandemic was going to get in her way.

A respected national publication called Library Journal took notice and awarded Little Taylor in its 2022 Movers & Shakers class of community builders for her outstanding leadership and impact to the library industry as a change agent. Only 41 people were in the 2022 class, and just over 1,000 librarians nationwide have earned such status since the awards were first given in 2002.

Library Journal has provided features and news reporting about American libraries since 1876 and is the top trade publication in that industry. Movers & Shakers profiles up-and-coming, innovative, creative individuals from around the world — both great leaders and behind-the-scenes contributors — who are providing inspiration and model programs for others, including programs developed this year in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Little Taylor is just the second MCFL employee to receive the national recognition; Diana Lopez, manager of the Marin City MCFL branch, was selected in 2016.

The publication noted that Little Taylor “worked tirelessly” to develop successful initiatives that are considered widely inclusive, stepping up to serve people in need and in marginalized populations. Her signature projects have included offering services to incarcerated youth, developing school partnerships, providing direct tutoring services, and overseeing the day-to-day operations of the Learning Bus, a “green” vehicle that brings literary and education outreach services to children and their families living in rural areas of West Marin. She also piloted a Reading Buddies program and implemented blueprints for safety around children working with adult volunteers.

Undeterred by the pandemic, Little Taylor moved the Reading Buddies program online, teamed with partners to create 500 new wireless hotspots for school-age children who were rushed into online learning for the first time, and led efforts to create a licensed day care center for children of health care and essential workers at an MCFL branch.

“The entire Marin County Free Library team stands with Raemona in our commitment to racial equity in Marin County,” said MCFL Director Lana Adlawan. “Raemona works tirelessly to ensure that community and staff voices are heard and that library programs are inclusive for all. She isn’t afraid to dream big and work hard to make new things happen. I am excited to see what she dreams up next!”

Little Taylor’s passion lies in offering services around literacy and education that are appropriate to the realities of disproportionately affected communities. The first step is acknowledging what she described as a long history of libraries as segregated spaces.

“Until libraries and librarians grapple with their history as gatekeepers for white-dominant culture, they will struggle to create welcoming and inclusive workplaces where diverse workers feel like they truly belong,” Little Taylor told the Library Journal. “It can be a real challenge to work within institutions as the one and only Black, Indigenous and people of color [BIPOC] staff member. We need to move beyond being tolerated to being celebrated.”

Little Taylor, an MCFL employee since 2017, is the public services administrator of the 10 MCFL branches and two mobile vehicles serving patrons in the field. Previously she was a teen and adult services librarian at the Fairfax branch and then senior librarian and education initiatives coordinator for four branches in West Marin. After earning her master’s degree from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, she began her professional career as a public records researcher and in several roles with the Nashville Public Library prior to joining MCFL.

Nominations for annual awards were vetted by the editors of Library Journal, giving weight to factors such as innovation, the impact of the person’s work, and the potential for programs to serve as models and inspiration for others in the field.

Continue Reading

Art

Marin Fair Competitive Exhibits Open for Entry

“We are thrilled to provide an array of online competitions for our community during our outdoor only 2022 Fair,” said Director of Cultural Services Gabriella Calicchio. “The Competitive Exhibits program is the heart and soul of the Fair and we’re excited to bring our talented community together again to participate.”

Published

on

Marin County Fair “So Happy Together!” returns June 30-July 4

Courtesy of Marin County

2022 Marin County Fair Poster depicting a variety of farm animals with the Marin County Civic Center and Marin Fairgrounds property in the background. San Rafael, California — With Marin County Fair’s June 30 opening day just around the corner, the Competitive Exhibits categories for the 2022 Fair are now available on the Fair’s website MarinFair.org.

The competitive exhibit program, which usually takes place indoors, will remain online for one more year and will include competitions such as fine art and photography, decorated cakes and cookies, wine and beer label design, clothing and textiles, cartoon art, exceptional art, poetry and creative writing, hobbies and crafts, and more. The Plein Air painting competition on the first day of the Fair will take place outdoors. The agriculture competitions will remain outdoors and will include poultry, rabbits, sheep dog trials, pocket pets, dog care and training, and small animal round robin showmanship, to name a few.

“We are thrilled to provide an array of online competitions for our community during our outdoor only 2022 Fair,” said Director of Cultural Services Gabriella Calicchio. “The Competitive Exhibits program is the heart and soul of the Fair and we’re excited to bring our talented community together again to participate.”

The full list of categories and entry guidelines is available online at MarinFair.org. Submissions will be accepted from May 6 to May 31 and winners will be announced online during Fair time.

The 2022 fair will also focus on outdoor entertainment including the headline concerts, performers roaming the grounds such as jugglers, unicyclists, and stilt walkers, and interactive art experiences for fans of all ages. Returning fair favorites will include traditional carnival rides, the Global Marketplace, the Barnyard, food and drinks, and fireworks every night over the Civic Center’s Lagoon Park.

Early bird tickets sold out within one day of release. Discounted Fair tickets are still available for adults and teens through June 29. The Fair is a one-price gate featuring 28 carnival rides, exciting exhibits, spectacular firework displays, first-rate concerts and exciting attractions are FREE with gate admission. Tickets are available online only at MarinFair.org.

Headline concerts will soon be announced, and reserved gold circle tickets will go on sale May 16. Reserved concert seating in a special section is $60 per person and includes Fair admission.

Special Admission Days:
Kids Day at the Fair – Thursday, June 30
Children 12 and under are FREE on Thursday, June 30.
Senior Day at the Fair – Thursday, June 30
Seniors 65+ are admitted FREE

Continue Reading

Subscribe to receive news and updates from the Oakland Post

* indicates required

CHECK OUT THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE OAKLAND POST

ADVERTISEMENT

WORK FROM HOME

Home-based business with potential monthly income of $10K+ per month. A proven training system and website provided to maximize business effectiveness. Perfect job to earn side and primary income. Contact Lynne for more details: Lynne4npusa@gmail.com 800-334-0540

Facebook

Trending