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Karolyne Ashley: Fashion Designer, Kidney Donor and American Success Story

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “We are excited to share our love and creativity with every woman that wants to tap into their inner goddess. Love is truly the key,” said Ashley, whose company, The Karolyne Ashley Atelier, has created “fantasy” evening wear pieces she says exude the most dreamy types of elegance and glamour.

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By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent
@StacyBrownMedia

Karolyne Ashley/Courtesy KA

Karolyne Ashley/Courtesy KA

For clothing designer and entrepreneur Karolyne Ashley, it all begins and ends with love.

The Drexel University graduate, who has been featured in Fashion Week events in New York, the Bahamas and Nigeria, said she has a passion for people and believes that the ultimate quality of life is created by loving each other “as deeply as we love ourselves.”

That importance, she said, reigns supreme as a core company value and acts as a guide in the process of planning the pieces she creates.

“We are excited to share our love and creativity with every woman that wants to tap into their inner goddess. Love is truly the key,” said Ashley, whose company, The Karolyne Ashley Atelier, has created “fantasy” evening wear pieces she says exude the most dreamy types of elegance and glamour.

Ashley’s designs are known for exuberant color palettes and innovative silhouettes, all which serve to capture the hearts of women globally.

“We pride ourselves in creating timeless pieces that will stand out within any crowd and turn heads on every red carpet. At the Karolyne Ashley Atelier we create custom evening wear pieces made-to-measure for each of our beautiful clients,” she said.

The company works within a community of sustainable design entrepreneurs whose vision is to re-shape the impact that fashion has on the world from negative to positive, Ashley said.

With a strong focus on glamorous evening wear and millinery, Karolyne Ashley brings holistic values to the special occasion and evening wear markets. “We are committed to produce our garments through sustainable means by utilizing transparent supply chains, producing locally in small curated production houses, and ensuring fair wages throughout our entire production pipeline,” Ashley said.

“We believe that beauty shouldn’t compromise our value nor is overindulgence exclusively equal to luxury fashion. With that, all of our products are either made-to-measure in our Karolyne Ashley Atelier or sold pre-sale via our website and at exclusive events.

“This model allows us to eliminate excess waste while supplying consciously fabulous fashionistas globally.”

Born and raised in Nashville, Tenn., Ashley and her family later moved to Richmond, Va., where she spent her high school years before relocating to Philadelphia for college.

Eventually, she opened a shop in Brooklyn and then re-located to Houston after providing a kidney for her brother who needed a transplant – something Ashley called a simple act of obedience to God.

“It was my immediate reaction to offer my kidney and I felt strongly that it was something God wanted me to do,” she said.

“I knew that I was taking a drastic physical action but had no comprehension of the sacrifices that I would have to make with my business, personal life and mental health.”

The Jan. 2018 surgery proved successful and her brother is doing exceptionally well, Ashley said.

In Houston, Ashley has opened a studio where she creates some of the most stunning lines of evening wear, bridal, millinery and custom designs.

Last month, Ashley attended the NNPA Mid-Winter Training Conference in Orlando, Florida, where she wore a stunning black ensemble – one of her signature designs. “This dress is actually a two-piece garment made of a black satin wrap skirt with an exaggerated hi-low hem and a textured bodysuit,” she said.

The pieces can be worn separately or together with other items.

“The skirt is called Roxie and was inspired by the need of having evening wear pieces that can grow and transform with the women that wear them,” Ashley said

Both pieces are a part of her “Rebirth” Collection that she premiered at Arise fashion week last March. “The overall collection was inspired by my journey through my brother’s surgery and recovery,” Ashely said.

“The mixture of dark colors and static brights are the expression of my many stages of healing and finding wholeness.”

The outfit is available for purchase at “The Pop-Up Co-Op” boutique in Houston and will soon be available for custom orders on her website.

Recently, Ashley was appointed as the head of the Style Shop at Workshop Houston, a nonprofit that focuses on community building through the creative arts.

The Style Shop at Workshop Houston has fashion, music production, STEM, and tutoring programs. Students perform hands-on projects within each discipline.

“As the coordinator of the Style Shop, I am building fashion curriculum that teaches both industry techniques as well as goal centric frameworks to build the students’ social and emotional attributes,” Ashley said.

She also serves on the board of the AU Diaspora African Forum based in Accra, Ghana, where she’s developing programming and collaborations that ultimately will be formed into camps, schools, and training platforms with a primary focus on building up young ones through the creative arts, entrepreneurship, and economic development.

When asked where she gets her inspiration, Ashely said it comes from her parents.

“I would say that I am constantly driven and inspired by my family and mixed cultural heritage. My father is Bahamian and my mother grew up in Brooklyn, NY but has roots deep in the south,” she said.

“So, I am drawn to the color and nature of the islands, the charm of the south, and the bustling energy of the city.

“This shows up in the layered colors and textures of my work. I have also always maintained a strong spiritual connection which guides me through various life experiences.”

“This deep sense of connection allows me to move fluidly through life’s journey. In ways, fashion becomes my therapy and allows me to speak through situations of turmoil and bliss. This shows up in my mood boards and silhouettes. I try to keep my eyes and heart open while creating so that each collection tells as deeper story.”

Activism

Grocery Inflation Causes Food Banks to be the Default for Families in Oakland

Steve Morris, Director of Natural Resources and Environment at GAO, explained that while the pandemic certainly had an effect on food increases, there is not one single factor for a rise in food prices. He said events like the Ukraine-Russian war, the avian influenza epidemic that raised the price of eggs, and climate change are also key factors.

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Photo: iStock image.
Photo: iStock image.

By Magaly Muñoz

During the past three years, the US has seen the largest increase in food prices since the 1980s. In response to this crisis, community food banks have emerged to provide much-needed assistance to families in need.

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports that national food prices have increased 11% from 2021 to 2022, when the average yearly increase was previously 2%. The San Francisco Bay Area saw a 12% increase from 2021 to 2022.

Steve Morris, Director of Natural Resources and Environment at GAO, explained that while the pandemic certainly had an effect on food increases, there is not one single factor for a rise in food prices. He said events like the Ukraine-Russian war, the avian influenza epidemic that raised the price of eggs, and climate change are also key factors.

While still maintaining that elevated prices will persist for the foreseeable future, Morris anticipates a decrease of 8% in food price increases.

He also stated that while the average person may spend 10% of their income on groceries, a low-income family may spend 30%, making the inflation in food prices that much harsher.

“Higher food prices can put people in a position where they have to make some tough choices between ‘can they go to the grocery store and buy food’ or ‘do they have to spend it on other necessities like home or health care or other things,’” Morris said.

Michael Altfest is the Director of Community Engagement and Marketing for Alameda County (AC) Food Bank, the primary food distributor in the county with over 400 community partners that receive frequent donations.

Altfest shared that from 2019 to 2023, the number of pounds of food distributed to their community partners has doubled. In 2019, the food bank distributed 32.5 million pounds of food, while in 2021 during the height of the pandemic, they distributed 58.1 million pounds. This year they are on pace to distribute almost 60 million pounds of food.

“If we’re on pace this year to provide more than we did in the pandemic, I think that says a lot about what the state of hunger is right now,” Altfest said.

During the height of the pandemic, state and federal government relief programs helped families offset significant expenses like groceries. These programs included the child tax credit increase that put anywhere from $2,000 up to $3,600 back into qualifying families pockets when filing their yearly taxes.

Another program that directly targeted food insecurity, was the increase in funds for SNAP or CalFresh. These government programs provide food-purchasing assistance for low- and no-income people to help them maintain adequate nutrition and health. But earlier this spring, funding was cut from the state program CalFresh and families saw at least a $95 decrease in their assistance.

“Every single person talks about the cost of living in Alameda County, every single person. The cost of rent, the cost of food, those are things that come up every single time without fail,” Altfest shared.

One of AC Food Bank’s community partners is Homies Empowerment, a non-profit in Oakland that was established as a means to support youth and the community through a positive lens.

Selena Duarte, the FREEdom Store Coordinator, said the organization’s initiative to help families with food provision began in May of 2020 when their original store was filled only with books and students told them that while it was nice to have things to read, “they can’t eat books,” showing the team at Homies Empowerment that there were bigger needs in the community that they had to address.

Since then, the organization has expanded its services. They now provide groceries every Tuesday, have established the FREEdom Farm where they grow produce that gets distributed in their make-shift store, offer hot breakfast to 40 students and their families five days a week, and much more.

Duarte said that they serve almost 400 families a week and they are continuing to expand their food services due to the increasing number of people coming to them seeking help to reduce their spending on groceries. She recognized that although people say that the “pandemic is over”, she knows that the stress that families are experiencing is still very real.

“The next phase is really becoming a sustainable community food hub, where literally we can grow, share, cook, and store our food here in the community and for the community,” Duarte said.

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Bay Area

PG&E Increases Rates While Bay Area Households Are Struggling to Stay Afloat

Prior to the pandemic, less than 2% of callers were asking for utility assistance, but in the last year that percentage has grown to 8.2%, according to Eden I&R data. Oakland made up 40% of the calls to 211, with Black and Latino individuals and single parents making up the majority of the callers. Female callers made up over double that of male callers and most ranged from 25 to 64 years old.

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PG&E is increasing utility rates for Californians causing the cost of living to rise as millions of residents struggle to pay their bills. Photo: iStock image.
PG&E is increasing utility rates for Californians causing the cost of living to rise as millions of residents struggle to pay their bills. Photo: iStock image.

By Magaly Muñoz

The cost of living is growing as millions of California customers will soon start to see the effects of PG&E raising their rates after a case ruling that will hike up monthly utility bills and ultimately raise the cost of living for struggling residents.

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) agreed in November to a request by the electric company for $13.5 billion for wildfire system enhancement and undergrounding, vegetation management, and capacity upgrades.

Starting Jan. 1, residents will see a nearly $33 increase in their upcoming electric and natural gas bill.

Mark Toney, Executive Director of The Utility Reform Network (TURN), an advocacy group, said that low-income families would be most affected by the change.

“I like to say we want the most green for the least green, and the cost of ‘greening the grid’ should not be cutting off low-income families of color from the grid because the monthly bills are too doggone high,” Toney said.

Toney said he was worried that if the cost of utilities continues to increase, some families would be unable to make their payments and would therefore, lose power.

If families choose cost-saving alternatives like using candles, the potential for a fire rises if families with small children accidentally knock something over and don’t put it out in time. People also rely on medical devices for health-related reasons to be hooked up for long periods of time, which could contribute to high costs in electricity bills.

Some Bay Area residents are already struggling to pay their utility bills.

Longtime Oakland resident, Rev. Dr. Barbara Jim-George has found herself using odd, potentially dangerous, alternatives to using her central heat, such as leaving open a hot oven to warm her living room because her apartment is “like a walk-in freezer.”

The CDC has warned against using this method to heat up your home as it can disperse dangerous pollutants and gasses, like carbon monoxide, and worsen already existing lung diseases.

“I can leave something sitting out on my table at night and it’s just fine as it would be in the refrigerator,” Jim-George said.

She had retired from her job in 2014 and was living on a tight budget for a few years until she found herself back at work in 2018 because her social security checks weren’t enough to pay bills.

As the cold and rainy weeks persist, the reverend anticipates a higher utility bill in the mail soon.

Jim-George shared that she had a cousin who lost their home in the Camp Fire of 2018, the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history, and blamed PG&E for not learning from these tragedies to do what was best for customers.

“They [PG&E] should have buried lines long ago because we’re eating the cost for [their mistakes]. I think it’s negligent on their side to not have had the foresight to understand the issues beforehand,” Jim-George said.

While the reverend is one of many who will have to resort to budgets and taking on second jobs in order to keep up with high housing bills, organizations across the area have seen a large intake of housing and emergency needs for decades, increasing with the effects of the pandemic in the last four years.

The need for utility assistance has grown exponentially, with four times the amount of calls coming in about families who have been without energy or are months behind in bills and are at risk of losing power in their homes.

“Housing [and related needs] remains our top concern for callers calling 211,” Allison DeJung said.

DeJung is the Executive Director of Eden I&R, which operates the calls and messages from 211 Bay Area- a multilingual 24/7 information hotline that connects callers with resources in Alameda County.

She said that in the last fiscal year, her team received over 69,000 calls and they made about 113,000 referrals to programs and organizations in the county for issues related to housing, utilities, food assistance and more.

Prior to the pandemic, less than 2% of callers were asking for utility assistance, but in the last year that percentage has grown to 8.2%, according to Eden I&R data. Oakland made up 40% of the calls to 211, with Black and Latino individuals and single parents making up the majority of the callers. Female callers made up over double that of male callers and most ranged from 25 to 64 years old.

DeJung said most callers looking for help paying their utility services were connected to Spectrum Community Services.

Spectrum is a nonprofit organization that has financially assisted low-income families and individuals through utility, water, and food aid since 1971.

Last year they received nearly 10,000 applications for their Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), which helps households pay overdue energy bills. The organization was only able to help 5,000 of those applicants.

Black households, similar to data from Eden I&R, were the majority of applicants for utility assistance at Spectrum, along with the majority of assistance coming from Oakland residents.

Lara Calvert, Executive Director of Spectrum Community Services, said the lack of funding is the primary reason they have to turn away applicants.

Assistance can be granted once every 12 months, with a cap of $3000 in overdue bills. Calvert said the large cap is what also contributes to helping less people every year because if multiple people apply for large quantities of assistance, funding runs out quicker.

Spectrum prioritizes households that have people who are over 60, anybody who’s disabled in the home, people who have children five years or younger, as well as people with a higher overall energy burden for their home.

A high energy burden is when a family’s energy or utility bills take up the majority of a household’s monthly income, making it difficult to maintain a sustainable quality of life.

Calvert shared that although the beginning of the pandemic brought more attention to the organization, 2023 was the largest year for residents asking for assistance from the program and it doesn’t look like it’s going to slow down soon.

“We are anticipating continuing to have a large number of people seeking assistance this year that will far outstrip our amount of money that we have to give out,” Calvert said.

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Activism

Oakland Post: Week of July 10 – 16, 2024

The printed Weekly Edition of the Oakland Post: Week of July 10 – 16, 2024

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